2

In Java, a String has methods:

length()/charAt(), codePointCount()/codePointAt()

C++11 has std::string a = u8"很烫烫的一锅汤";

but a.size() is the length of char array, cannot index the unicode char.

Is there any solutions for unicode in C++ string ?

  • 1
    Have you checked this answer?: stackoverflow.com/a/31475700/58129 – Anthony Kong Apr 9 '17 at 2:06
  • I usually convert utf-8 to UTF-32/UCS-2 std::wstring so that each code point is one character. There is code to convert in this answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/42791433/… else use a library – Galik Apr 9 '17 at 2:24
  • UCS-2 does not have room for all Chinese characters. – Rick James Apr 9 '17 at 3:52
  • @RickJames: Galik likely meant UTF-16 instead – Remy Lebeau Apr 10 '17 at 20:42
  • UTF-16 does not have room for all Chinese characters in a single 'character'. So a.size() will (I think) be incorrect. – Rick James Apr 11 '17 at 5:22
3

I generally convert the UTF-8 string to a wide UTF-32/UCS-2 string before doing character operations. C++ does actually give us functions to do that but they are not very user friendly so I have written some nicer conversion functions here:

// This should convert to whatever the system wide character encoding 
// is for the platform (UTF-32/Linux - UCS-2/Windows)
std::string ws_to_utf8(std::wstring const& s)
{
    std::wstring_convert<std::codecvt_utf8<wchar_t>, wchar_t> cnv;
    std::string utf8 = cnv.to_bytes(s);
    if(cnv.converted() < s.size())
        throw std::runtime_error("incomplete conversion");
    return utf8;
}

std::wstring utf8_to_ws(std::string const& utf8)
{
    std::wstring_convert<std::codecvt_utf8<wchar_t>, wchar_t> cnv;
    std::wstring s = cnv.from_bytes(utf8);
    if(cnv.converted() < utf8.size())
        throw std::runtime_error("incomplete conversion");
    return s;
}

int main()
{
    std::string s = u8"很烫烫的一锅汤";

    auto w = utf8_to_ws(s); // convert to wide (UTF-32/UCS-2)

    // now we can use code-point indexes on the wide string

    std::cout << s << " is " << w.size() << " characters long" << '\n';
}

Output:

很烫烫的一锅汤 is 7 characters long

If you want to convert to and from UTF-32 regardless of platform then you can use the following (not so well tested) conversion routines:

std::string utf32_to_utf8(std::u32string const& utf32)
{
    std::wstring_convert<std::codecvt_utf8<char32_t>, char32_t> cnv;
    std::string utf8 = cnv.to_bytes(utf32);
    if(cnv.converted() < utf32.size())
        throw std::runtime_error("incomplete conversion");
    return utf8;
}

std::u32string utf8_to_utf32(std::string const& utf8)
{
    std::wstring_convert<std::codecvt_utf8<char32_t>, char32_t> cnv;
    std::u32string utf32 = cnv.from_bytes(utf8);
    if(cnv.converted() < utf8.size())
        throw std::runtime_error("incomplete conversion");
    return utf32;
}

NOTE: As of C++17 std::wstring_convert is deprecated.

However I still prefer to use it over a third party library because it is portable, it avoids external dependencies, it won't be removed until a replacement is provided and in all cases it will be easy to replace the implementations of these functions without having to change all the code that uses them.

| improve this answer | |
  • cool, but I have see some discussions, which says, in different platform, wchar_t can be uint16_t, not uint32_t. It can raise error when indexing char in unicode strings. – linrongbin Apr 9 '17 at 2:43
  • @zhaochenyou This should convert correctly for each platform. On Windows it will create 2-byte wchar_t characters encoded in UCS-2 and on Linux it will create 4-byte wchar_t characters encoded with UTF-32. – Galik Apr 9 '17 at 2:45
  • This will work well until someone goes and gives you a string with a '💩' character in it. Then you'll get different lengths on different platforms. – Miles Budnek Apr 9 '17 at 2:53
  • @MilesBudnek I have added code to convert to UTF-32 regardless of platform which, I assume, should fix any problems 2 char encoding may have (your character works fine on Linux I can't test on Windows unfortunately) – Galik Apr 9 '17 at 2:59
  • Yes, all currently existing Unicode code points will fit into a single UTF-32 unit. – Miles Budnek Apr 9 '17 at 3:03

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