58

In a mercurial repo I can run hg up {revision} to change the revision of my working directory, but what command can I run to discover what revision I'm looking at?

70

This command:

hg parent
  • 2
    Yes, you are right! Where was I. – pyfunc Dec 2 '10 at 0:46
  • @pyfunc: i've wasted about minute with terrible captchas, otherwise I could be first :-) – zerkms Dec 2 '10 at 0:47
  • 1
    The hg man page says hg parents is DEPRECATED, although perhaps that might not have been the case when you wrote this answer. If there is an uncommitted merge, there are two parent revisions. – Shelby Moore III Nov 26 '15 at 16:12
  • 1
    Why is this command called "parent"? It shows information about the current commit, not the current commit's parent. – Jamie Jul 19 '16 at 17:10
  • 2
    @Jamie naming is hard :-D – zerkms Jul 19 '16 at 20:59
23

In addition to hg parents, you can use hg summary to get the most important summary information about your current state. It looks like this:

% hg summary
parent: 13051:120eccaaa522 tip
 encoding: fix typo in variable name
branch: default
commit: 2 unknown (clean)
update: (current)
mq:     20 unapplied

and tells me at a glance that I'm at revision 13051, that I'm on the default branch with a clean working copy (though there are 2 untracked files). This is the tip revision in my repository, so an update wont do anything. Finally, I have 20 unapplied MQ patches.

  • 20 unapplied patches?! Time for qqueue? – Geoffrey Zheng Dec 3 '10 at 17:53
  • Nah, I lose the overview with qqueue. Instead I just group the patches in small batches: 4 patches for feature X, 5 patches for feature Y, etc. If I want to work on feature X, then I move the relevant patches up front in the queue using the TortoiseHg log viewer. – Martin Geisler Dec 9 '10 at 11:46
  • But it is not the most specific answer to the question, because since hg summary lacks --template there is no way to extract just the revision and nothing else. – Shelby Moore III Nov 26 '15 at 13:34
15

hg identify (or hg id for short) will print the (shortened 12-character identifier of) the parent hashes, and a + if there are any uncommitted modifications in your working copy.

To get the full hashes, you can use hg identify --debug instead.

  • 1
    Just as a note, by default, hg parent shows more info than hg id. – gbmhunter Apr 16 '14 at 23:54
  • But it is not the most specific answer to the question, because afaik hg id -i prints only the short (12 characters) form of the global hash id and since hg identify lacks --template afaics there is no way to extract just the revision and nothing else since the man page says it prints a summary. Also don't you need hg id -n and/or hg id -i? – Shelby Moore III Nov 26 '15 at 14:14
  • 2
    @ShelbyMooreIII 12 hex characters is 6 bytes, or 48 bits, so there are 2^48 possible short identifiers. According to the birthday paradox, about 1.2 * sqrt(2^48) = roughly 2 million commits are then needed to get a 50% probability of a collision. The short identifier will almost always be fine. – Wim Coenen Nov 26 '15 at 19:04
  • 1
    Correct math says roughly 15 million for 50% collision probability. But who would use a system with a 50% probability of failure. Take a more reasonable safety margin of 1-in-million chance of failure, then the number of commits drops to less than 25,000. The acceptable level of probability will depend on the application. For example, is that 12 digit hexadecimal being recorded in changeset comments. Note in DVCS it is not just our local commits that matter but potentially everyone's experiments. Avoid “wtf” surprise. – Shelby Moore III Nov 26 '15 at 20:02
  • @ShelbyMooreIII fine, I've amended my answer with a way to get the full hashes from hg identify. – Wim Coenen Nov 27 '15 at 13:33
4

Another option is to enable the graphlog extension, then run hg glog. You'll see output like this (bear in mind I use a template to change the output):

o    changeset:   200:c8c281cf0a6d
|\   branch:      craig-aspinall
| |  tag:         tip
| |  parent:      199:1a692f3b9134
| |  parent:      187:2d0e0ed9d31c
| |  user:        Craig Aspinall
| |  date:        Tue Nov 23 21:36:30 2010 +1000
| |  summary:     Merged latest changes
| |
| o  changeset:   199:1a692f3b9134
| |  branch:      craig-aspinall
| |  parent:      123:1dc90c9b7ede
| |  user:        Craig Aspinall
| |  date:        Tue Nov 23 21:35:22 2010 +1000
| |  summary:     Final solutions to L04
| |
| | @    changeset:   198:78b488c2607d       <==== This is where I am currently.
| | |\   branch:      OJ
| | | |  parent:      119:70ec3d9e4d3a
| | | |  parent:      197:44bac809d37d
| | | |  user:        OJ Reeves
| | | |  date:        Tue Nov 23 20:19:07 2010 +1000
| | | |  summary:     Merged with the mainline
| | | |
| | | o  changeset:   197:44bac809d37d
| | | |  user:        Tony Morris
| | | |  date:        Tue Nov 23 18:40:03 2010 +1000
| | | |  summary:     Started parallel anagrams
| | | |
| | | o  changeset:   196:92241b51970b
| | | |  user:        Tony Morris
| | | |  date:        Tue Nov 23 17:52:32 2010 +1000
| | | |  summary:     Started parallel anagrams
| | | |

The node/revision with the @ symbol is where you are.

1

The most specific non-DEPRECATED command which due to the presence of --template can print only revision information if that conciseness is required (as implied by the question):

hg log -l 1 -b . -T '{rev}:{node|short}\n'

Or:

hg log -l 1 -b . -T '{rev}\n'

Or:

hg log -l 1 -r . -T '{rev}\n'

Or for unique long form of hash:

hg log -l 1 -r . -T '{node}\n'

The -b . or branch(.) (dot for branch name) means the current working directory branch and -r . means the current working directory revision, which is documented in hg help revsets and hg help revisions.

Note if there is an uncommitted merge, the . (dot) only displays the first parent of two parents of the working group.

1

This will also helpful,

hg log -v -r `hg id -i`

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