28

Is there a simple solution/idea/strategy to create a setTimeout equivalent function in a WinForms app. I'm primarily a web developer but am not sure how I'd go about this in a WinForms App. Basically, I have a textbox, and after each keystroke I want to run a task to populate a list (like an auto-complete type thingy) but want to be able to cancel (e.g. clearTimeout) if the user keeps entering characters...

My only guess is to perhaps use a BackGroundWorker and make it sleep initially, and while it is sleeping, it could be cancelled, if the user stops entering keys and the sleep period ends, it then goes and runs the task etc

(i don't care if an example is C# or Vb.Net)

1

11 Answers 11

58

I know this is an old question but an alternative solution would be to use Task.Delay(delay).ContinueWith((task) => { /* Code */ });.

Thread.Sleep vs Task.Delay?

or there is await Task.Delay(delay);

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/vstudio/en-US/345f0402-3af0-4f96-a501-073674883ba3/building-an-async-settimeout-function?forum=csharpgeneral

1
  • 2
    Things have come a long way since then...thanks for posting the answer! Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 23:31
17

You can use a System.Timers.Timer: set AutoReset to false and use Start/Stop methods and create a handler for the Elapsed event.

Here's an example implementation in vb.net:

  Public Sub SetTimeout(act As Action, timeout as Integer)
    Dim aTimer As System.Timers.Timer
    aTimer = New System.Timers.Timer(1)
    ' Hook up the Elapsed event for the timer. 
    AddHandler aTimer.Elapsed, Sub () act
    aTimer.AutoReset = False
    aTimer.Enabled = True
  End Sub 
13

Timer Implementation:

public void SetTimeout(Action action, int timeout)
{
    var timer = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer();
    timer.Interval = timeout;
    timer.Tick += delegate (object sender, EventArgs args)
    {
        action();
        timer.Stop();
    };
    timer.Start();
}
1
  • This doesn't include cancelling
    – Sahin
    Commented Aug 29, 2022 at 17:57
11
    public void setTimeout(Action TheAction, int Timeout)
    {
        Thread t = new Thread(
            () =>
            {
                Thread.Sleep(Timeout);
                TheAction.Invoke();
            }
        );
        t.Start();
    }
2
  • 11
    I wouldn't recommend using this method. Creating a whole thread just for a single operation? Overkill. Use the Timer class provided in the other method for something more production-worthy. According to this answer, 1 MB of memory is allocated for each new thread. stackoverflow.com/a/2744464/881111 -- Remember, the OP said that he was going to run this after each keystroke... so consider 1 MB of memory AND a new thread for each keystroke. Bad idea.
    – marknuzz
    Commented May 29, 2014 at 5:09
  • Not only a bad idea. This probably has concurrency issues Commented Feb 5, 2017 at 23:18
7

I can propose following

internal class Timeout : System.Timers.Timer
{
    public Timeout (Action action, double delay)
    {
        this.AutoReset = false;
        this.Interval = delay;
        this.Elapsed += (sender, args) => action();
        this.Start();
    }
}
// Example
var timeout = new Timeout(() => {
    Console.WriteLine("init 1");
}, 500);
timeout.Stop();
3

when using Task.Delay() and your action to edit/set winforms control. you have to add TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() or will get error Cross thread operation

void SetTimeout(Action action, int ms)
{
    Task.Delay(ms).ContinueWith((task) =>
    {
        action();
    }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
}           

SetTimeout(() => {
    myButton.Enabled = true;
}, 3000);  
2

This is my way, use C# 7.0 syntax feature. Some differ with js, when timeout action execute then will can't be clear.

internal static class JsStyleTimeout
{
    private static readonly ConcurrentDictionary<int, Thread> InnerDic;

    private static int _handle;

    static JsStyleTimeout()
    {
        InnerDic = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, Thread>();
    }

    public static int Set(Action action, int delayMs)
    {
        var handle = Interlocked.Increment(ref _handle);

        var thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate
        {
            Thread.Sleep(delayMs);
            InnerDic.TryRemove(handle, out var _);
            Task.Factory.StartNew(action);
        }));
        InnerDic.TryAdd(handle, thread);

        thread.Start();
        return handle;
    }

    public static void Clear(int handle)
    {
        if (InnerDic.TryRemove(handle, out var thread))
            thread.Abort();
    }
}
0
2

You can use also:

Delay.Do(3000 /*in ms*/, () => { /* Do somthing */ });

Where Delay.Do is:

using System;
using System.Timers;

public class Delay
{
    public static void Do(int after, Action action)
    {
        if (after <= 0 || action == null) return;

        var timer = new Timer { Interval = after, Enabled = false };

        timer.Elapsed += (sender, e) =>
        {
            timer.Stop();
            action.Invoke();
            timer.Dispose();
            GC.SuppressFinalize(timer);
        };

        timer.Start();
    }
}

Note: When updating a control in the UI thread use Control.Invoke:

Delay.Do(2000, () => { lblOk.Invoke((MethodInvoker)(() => { lblOk.Visible = false; })); });
1

It's a good idea to start with a static class that will handle our time events. We can name it Timeman. Then create a package for each action that starts with a delay. We can name it TimemanEvent. Here is an example of use and source code:

    // Register an timed event
    var id = Timeman.SetTimeout(() => {
       Console.log("Code was executed");
    }, 3000);  
    // OR
    var id = Timeman.SetTimeout(MyMethod, 3000);
    // Destroy the event
    Timeman.ClearTimeout(id);



public class Timeman {

    private static readonly ConcurrentDictionary<int, TimemanEvent> InnerDic;

    static Timeman() {
        InnerDic = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, TimemanEvent>();
    }

    /// <summary> Generate Unique Dictionary Id </summary>
    private static int GetUniqueId() {
        // If dict is empty take zero
        if (InnerDic.Keys.Count == 0) return 0;
        // If there is only one, take next
        if (InnerDic.Keys.Count == 1) return InnerDic.Keys.First() + 1;
        // Get all id numbers
        var allKeys = InnerDic.Keys.ToList();
        // Check the missing numbers in order.
        allKeys.Sort();
        var firstNumber = allKeys.First();
        var lastNumber = allKeys.Last();
        var missingNumbers = Enumerable.Range(firstNumber, lastNumber).Except(allKeys);
        // If missing numbers are found, take the first one
        if (missingNumbers.Count() > 0) return missingNumbers.First();
        // Take next
        return lastNumber + 1;
    }

    /// <summary> 
    /// Runs the method after a time(ms) has elapsed.
    /// <code>
    /// var id = Timeman.SetTimeout(() => {
    ///     Console.log("Code was executed");
    /// }, 3000);  
    /// OR
    /// var id = Timeman.SetTimeout(MyMethod, 3000);
    /// </code>
    /// </summary>
    public static int SetTimeout(Action action, int delayMs) {

        var uniqueId = GetUniqueId();
        var te = new TimemanEvent(uniqueId, action, delayMs);
        InnerDic.TryAdd(uniqueId, te);
        te.Start();
        return uniqueId;
    }

    /// <summary> 
    /// Removes the timeout before completion.
    /// <code>
    /// Timeman.ClearTimeout(id);
    /// </code>
    /// </summary>
    public static void ClearTimeout(int id) {
        if (InnerDic.TryRemove(id, out var tEvent))
            tEvent?.Dispose();
    }
}
internal class TimemanEvent {

    private readonly Action action;
    private readonly Timer timer;
    private readonly int id;

    public TimemanEvent(int id, Action action, int delayMs) {
        
        this.id = id;
        this.action = action;
        this.timer = new Timer
        {
            Interval = delayMs
        };
        timer.Tick += OnTimerTick;
    }

    private void OnTimerTick(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        
        action();
        Timeman.ClearTimeout(id);
    }

    /// <summary> Stop timer and unregister events </summary>
    internal void Dispose() {

        timer.Tick -= OnTimerTick;
        Stop();
    }

    internal void Start() => timer.Start();

    internal void Stop() => timer.Stop();
}
0
    public void setTimeout(Action act, int timeout)
    {
        Action action = () =>
        {
            Thread.Sleep(Timeout);
            act();
        };

        new Thread(() => Invoke(action)).Start();
    }
0
0

I'd recommend using reactive programming for this. See https://github.com/Reactive-Extensions/Rx.NET for the Reactive Extensions for .NET and http://reactivex.io/ for the general information about Reactive programming.

I'm afraid I'm only familiar with the JavaScript reactive library, so I can't give you a C-Sharp example, but in JavaScript it'd work something like this:

Rx.Observable.fromEvent(..eventdetails..)
    .debounceTime(300)
    .distinctUntilChanged()
    .subscribe(eventHandler);

Using a setup like this you can chain operators to map and merge all kinds of events from a source to a subscriber. The simple example above reacts to an event, a keyUp for instance, and waits until there is no new keyUp for 300 ms and then calls the eventHandler, but only if the new value (after 300ms) is different from the last emitted value.

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