-1

Here is my code:

public void BroadcastTheConnection()
      {
        try
        {
            //............avoid unnecessary codes 
            while (ServerRunning)
            {
                s = myList.AcceptSocket();// blocking the content until client request accomplished 



                displayText.AppendText("\nConnected");
                Thread tcpHandlerThread = new Thread(tcpHandler);
                tcpHandlerThread.Name = "tcpHandler";
                tcpHandlerThread.Start();

             }

         }catch (Exception ex)
            {
                displayText.AppendText("Error----" + Environment.NewLine + ex.StackTrace);
            }
        }

This code works perfectly when I try to connect multiple clients. When I try to move my form after I broadcast the connection it doesn't work. I know this is threading problem, but how can I avoid this trouble?

And here is my button:

private void bBroadcast_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            BroadcastTheConnection();          
        }

Do I need to use lock statements? or delegates? any ideas? then how?

  • You should think about creating dedicated Thread only for the network communication purpose. Then if you want to transfer data from communication thread into the UI thread you should use some synchronization context. – Mateusz Apr 10 '17 at 11:27
  • You need to put the broadcasttheconnection into a thread – BugFinder Apr 10 '17 at 11:28
  • @BugFinder - if you don't mind, could you please give me an example... – Hamun Sunga Apr 10 '17 at 11:32
  • You can use BackgroundWorker for solving to easy way – Erdem Köşk Apr 10 '17 at 11:40
  • So its homework?? Im pretty sure you should have marked your question as such but also he will have covered these concepts with you – BugFinder Apr 10 '17 at 11:49
1

The problem is that BroadcastTheConnection() is being called from the UI thread itself. Since it has a while (ServerRunning) {} construct, the UI thread will be spinning on your code until ServerRunning is false.

There are several ways to implement the same fix: get the server code off of the UI thread. Each of these has their tradeoffs.

  • Use BroadcastTheConnection() as a long running task (not recommended)
  • Stand up a thread where BroadcastTheConnection() is the main method.
  • Use asynchronous socket calls. (too complicated for a quick answer)

Long Running Task

Task.Factory.StartNew(BroadcastTheConnection,
                      TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);

This is quick and easy, but you don't want too many long running tasks as they can take up threads in the task threadpool for a long time.

Dedicated Thread

Thread connectionThread = new Thread(BroadcastTheConnection)
{
    Name = "BroadcaseTheConnection Thread",
    IsBackground = true
};
connectionThread.Start();

This doesn't use any threads from the task threadpool, gives you a named thread that can help with debugging, and prevents the thread from keeping your application running if you forget to end it.

Working with the UI from the socket code

Any time you need to interact with the UI in any way, you need to put your call into the UI thread again. WinForms and WPF have slightly different ways of doing the same thing.

WinForms

myControl.BeginInvoke(myControl.Method); // nonblocking

myControl.Invoke(myControl.Method); // blocking

WPF

myControl.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(myControl.Method); // nonblocking

myControl.Dispatcher.Invoke(myControl.Method); // blocking

Be warned, too many calls to BeginInvoke in a row can overload the UI thread. It's better to batch them than to fire off a lot of requests in a row.

  • Why don't you use async and await? It is much easier. Check my answer. – Kfir Guy Apr 10 '17 at 11:49
  • In Dedicated Thread use, Anonymous methods right? – Hamun Sunga Apr 10 '17 at 11:49
  • @KfirGuy, it has to do with the BroadcastTheConnection() code being long running. Also, it's easier to identify when you have more than one of these happening at the same time. That's why I would advocate a dedicated thread to this. – Berin Loritsch Apr 10 '17 at 11:51
  • @HamunSunga, If your logic is complex enough, you might just want to extend Thread and overload the Thread.Start() method. However, you can use anonymous methods just fine. – Berin Loritsch Apr 10 '17 at 11:53
  • async and await also work well with long running tasks. It does not block the UI. – Kfir Guy Apr 10 '17 at 11:53
1

make below changes using Async and Await

private async void bBroadcast_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) //-- Async
{
    ipAdrsNew = ipBox.Text;
    portNo = Convert.ToInt32(portBox.Text);
    await BroadcastTheConnection();           //-- await
}

public Task BroadcastTheConnection()
{
   return Task.Run(() =>
   {
       //---- code for BroadcastTheConnection 
   });
}
  • Why would you manage the tasks directly? Just use async and await. – Kfir Guy Apr 10 '17 at 11:39
  • So the assignment is wrong. In C#, the correct way to do asynchronous programming is with async and await. Check my answer to see how much it is easier than using Threads or Tasks. – Kfir Guy Apr 10 '17 at 11:50
1

You can use async and await to achieve asynchronous networking in C#.

Try this (I have also refactored your code):

public async Task BroadcastConnectionAsync(IPAddress address, int port)
{
    try
    {
        var listener = new TcpListener(address, port);

        ServerRunning = true;
        // Start Listeneting at the specified port

        listener.Start();
        displayText.AppendText("The server is running at port 8001...\n");

        while (ServerRunning)
        {
            using (var socket = await listener.AcceptSocketAsync())
            {
                listOFClientsSocks.Add(socket);
                listBox1.DataSource = listOFClientsSocks;

                displayText.AppendText("\nConnected");
                new Thread(tcpHandler)
                {
                    Name = "tcpHandler"
                }.Start();
            }
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        displayText.AppendText("Error----" + Environment.NewLine + ex.StackTrace);
    }
}

And your click event handler:

private async void bBroadcast_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var address = IPAddress.Parse(ipBox.Text);
    int port = Convert.ToInt32(portBox.Text);
    await BroadcastConnectionAsync(address, port);
}
  • Thanks , I will try this also...:) – Hamun Sunga Apr 10 '17 at 12:03
  • Async-Await is the best and suggested option, though there's an issue, as event is void return type, the Async method shall also be void return not Task. Also starting another thread, updating Ui control inside Async method are not good operations – Mrinal Kamboj Apr 10 '17 at 12:35
1

Simplest example using Thread to listen and communicate with remote end :

public class ListenerThread
{
    // clients list/queue
    Queue<ClientConnection> m_Clients;
    // thread used to listen for new connections
    Thread m_Thread;
    Socket m_Socket;
    IPEndPoint m_LocalEndPoint;

    volatile bool m_IsListening;

    public ListenerThread(int port)
    {
        // get this machine hostname
        IPHostEntry ipHostInfo = Dns.Resolve(Dns.GetHostName());  
        // resolve ip address from hostname
        IPAddress ipAddress = ipHostInfo.AddressList[0];  
        // create local end point object 
        m_LocalEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(ipAddress, port);  
    }

    void Listen()
    {
        // reset clients list
        m_Clients = new Queue<ClientConnection>();
        // initialize socket
        m_Socket = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp ); 
        // bind this socket to listen for incomming connections to specified end point
        m_Socekt.Bind(localEndPoint);
        // start listening with backlog of 1337 connections
        m_Socket.Listen(1337);  
        // dont forget to dispose after socket was used to "unbind" it
        using ( m_Socket )
        {
            while ( m_IsListening )
            {
                // while listening just accept connections and start them at another thread
                Socket client = m_Socket.Accept();
                if ( client != null )
                {
                    m_Clients.Enqueue(new ClientConnection(client));
                }
            }
        }
    }

    // method used to start the listening server
    public void Start()
    {
        if ( m_Thread == null )
        {
            m_Thread = new Thread(Listen);
        }

        m_IsListening = true;
        m_Thread.Start();
    }

    // method used to stop listening server
    public void Stop()
    {
        m_Listening = false;
        m_Thread.Join();
        while ( m_Clients.Count != 0 )
        {
            m_Clients.Dequeue().Kill();
        }
    }
}

// class used to communicate with the client
public class ClientConnection
{
    Socket m_Socket; // client socket
    Thread m_Thread; // communication thread

    volatile bool m_IsCommunicating;

    // this should start immediately because of the incomming connection priority
    internal ClientConnection(Socket socket)
    {
        m_Socket = socket;
        m_Thread = new Thread(Communicate);
        m_Thread.Start();
    }

    // loop in which you should send/receive data
    void Communicate()
    {
        while ( m_IsCommunicating )
        {
            // .. do your communication stuff
        }
    }

    // should be only used by ListenerThread to end communication.
    internal void Kill()
    {
        m_IsCommunicating = false;
        try
        {
            m_Thread.Join(5 * 1000);
            m_Thread.Abort();
        }
        catch(Exception ex) { /*...*/ }
    }
}

This is really simplest example possible, so you should modify this for your needs.
To use this with your example just start the ListenerThread :

ListenerThread listener = new ListenerThread(8001);
listener.Start();
displayText.AppendText("The server is running at port 8001...\n");

Last thing is if you want to make calls to the UI, I would suggest using SynchronizationContext. To make it clearer in ListenerThread constructor call this :

m_Sync = SynchronizationContext.Current;

And make another field :

SynchronizationContext m_Sync;

Then just pass this context into ClientConnection constructor as new ClientConnection(m_Sync, client);.

Now you can use SynchronizationContext.Post method eg. :

m_Sync.Post( state => { someUITextElement.AppendText((string)state); }, "hello world");
1

There is an asynchronous variant of AcceptSocket called BeginAcceptSocket, which waits for a connection asynchronously and starts a new thread for a new socket connected. You still have to wait for the operation to be completed, because you are in a while loop, but you can use this time for a call to Application.DoEvents, that will allow the UI to update.

while (ServerRunning)
{
    AsyncHandler handler = delegate(asyncResult)
    {
        //Get the new socket
        Socket socket = myList.EndAcceptSocket(asyncResult);

        //Marshal UI specific code back to the UI thread
        MethodInvoker invoker = delegate()
        {
            listOFClientsSocks.Add(socket);
            listBox1.DataSource = listOFClientsSocks;
            displayText.AppendText("\nConnected");
        };
        listBox1.Invoke(invoker);

        //Call the handler
        tcpHandler();
    }
    IAsyncResult waitResult = myList.BeginAcceptSocket(handler, null);

    //Wait until the async result's wait handle receives a signal
    //Use a timeout to referesh the application every 100 milliseconds
    while (!waitResult.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(100))
    {
        Application.DoEvents();
        if (!ServerRunning)
        {
            break;
        }
    }
}

The solution makes your UI responsive with relatively changes to your code structure. I would however recommend to rethink your entire strategy of using the TcpListener. Listening to TCP connections in your UI thread is generally not a good idea. Create a dedicated class that does the listening for you in a separate thread and access it from your UI code.

You should also be aware, that in the code above your catch block won't handle anything inside the anonymous delegate used by BeginAcceptSocket. I have also added code to stop listening when the server is not running anymore. This is probably not necessary, since in this case BeginAcceptSocket will throw an exception. It serves though as an additional safeguard.

0

You can use Background worker also. Below is a small example of the same.

private void MainMethod()
        {
            BackgroundWorker bg = new BackgroundWorker();
            bg.DoWork += Bg_DoWork;
            bg.RunWorkerCompleted += Bg_RunWorkerCompleted;

        }

        private void Bg_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            //here do your UI related work like changing the color of label or filling up data in grid etc
        }

        private void Bg_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            //Here do your time consuming work without blocking ui thread
        }

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