26

For example, I have 1D vector with dimension (5). I would like to reshape it into 2D matrix (1,5).

Here is how I do it with numpy

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5])
>>> a.shape
(5,)
>>> a = np.reshape(a, (1,5))
>>> a.shape
(1, 5)
>>> a
array([[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]])
>>> 

But how can I do that with Pytorch Tensor (and Variable). I don't want to switch back to numpy and switch to Torch variable again, because it will loss backpropagation information.

Here is what I have in Pytorch

>>> import torch
>>> from torch.autograd import Variable
>>> a = torch.Tensor([1,2,3,4,5])
>>> a

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
[torch.FloatTensor of size 5]

>>> a.size()
(5L,)
>>> a_var = variable(a)
>>> a_var = Variable(a)
>>> a_var.size()
(5L,)
.....do some calculation in forward function
>>> a_var.size()
(5L,)

Now I want it size to be (1, 5). How can I resize or reshape the dimension of pytorch tensor in Variable without loss grad information. (because I will feed into another model before backward)

21

Use torch.unsqueeze(input, dim, out=None)

>>> import torch
>>> a = torch.Tensor([1,2,3,4,5])
>>> a

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
[torch.FloatTensor of size 5]

>>> a = a.unsqueeze(0)
>>> a

 1  2  3  4  5
[torch.FloatTensor of size 1x5]
14

you might use

a.view(1,5)
Out: 

 1  2  3  4  5
[torch.FloatTensor of size 1x5]
  • 2
    Note that this does not modify the original tensor a. It just creates a view. – kmario23 Dec 6 '17 at 5:37
7

For in-place modification of the tensor, you should definitely use tensor.resize_():

In [23]: a = torch.Tensor([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])

In [24]: a.shape
Out[24]: torch.Size([5])


# tensor.resize_((`new_shape`))    
In [25]: a.resize_((1,5))
Out[25]: 

 1  2  3  4  5
[torch.FloatTensor of size 1x5]

In [26]: a.shape
Out[26]: torch.Size([1, 5])

In PyTorch, if there's an underscore at the end of an operation (like tensor.resize_()) then that operation does in-place modification to the original tensor.


Also, you can simply use np.newaxis in a torch Tensor to increase the dimension. Here is an example:

In [34]: list_ = range(5)
In [35]: a = torch.Tensor(list_)
In [36]: a.shape
Out[36]: torch.Size([5])

In [37]: new_a = a[np.newaxis, :]
In [38]: new_a.shape
Out[38]: torch.Size([1, 5])
4

or you can use this, the '-1' means you don't have to specify the number of the elements.

In [3]: a.view(1,-1)
Out[3]:

 1  2  3  4  5
[torch.FloatTensor of size 1x5]
4

This question has been thoroughly answered already, but I want to add for the less experienced python developers that you might find the * operator helpful in conjunction with view().

For example if you have a particular tensor size that you want a different tensor of data to conform to, you might try:

img = Variable(tensor.randn(20,30,3)) # tensor with goal shape
flat_size = 20*30*3
X = Variable(tensor.randn(50, flat_size)) # data tensor

X = X.view(-1, *img.size()) # sweet maneuver
print(X.size()) # size is (50, 20, 30, 3)

This works with numpy shape too:

img = np.random.randn(20,30,3)
flat_size = 20*30*3
X = Variable(tensor.randn(50, flat_size))
X = X.view(-1, *img.shape)
print(X.size()) # size is (50, 20, 30, 3)
1
import torch
>>>a = torch.Tensor([1,2,3,4,5])
>>>a.size()
torch.Size([5])
#use view to reshape

>>>b = a.view(1,a.shape[0])
>>>b
tensor([[1., 2., 3., 4., 5.]])
>>>b.size()
torch.Size([1, 5])
>>>b.type()
'torch.FloatTensor'
0

Assume the following code:

import torch
import numpy as np
a = torch.tensor([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])

The following three calls have the exact same effect:

res_1 = a.unsqueeze(0)
res_2 = a.view(1, 5)
res_3 = a[np.newaxis,:]
res_1.shape == res_2.shape == res_3.shape == (1,5)  # Returns true

Notice that for any of the resulting tensors, if you modify the data in them, you are also modifying the data in a, because they don't have a copy of the data, but reference the original data in a.

res_1[0,0] = 2
a[0] == res_1[0,0] == 2  # Returns true

The other way of doing it would be using the resize_ in place operation:

a.shape == res_1.shape  # Returns false
a.reshape_((1, 5))
a.shape == res_1.shape # Returns true

Be careful of using resize_ or other in-place operation with autograd. See the following discussion: https://pytorch.org/docs/stable/notes/autograd.html#in-place-operations-with-autograd

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