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I have read and tried to inject vulnerable sql queries to my application. It is not safe enough. I am simply using the Statement Connection for database validations and other insertion operations.

Is the preparedStatements safe? and moreover will there be any problem with this statement too?

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    Prepared statements are the way to go. AFAIK a prepared statement would only be parsed once so there's no chance of SQL injection at a later date. Of course, you'll still need to sanitse input to protect against XSS attacks, etc.
    – CurtainDog
    Dec 2, 2010 at 8:25

4 Answers 4

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Using string concatenation for constructing your query from arbitrary input will not make PreparedStatement safe. Take a look at this example:

preparedStatement = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE name = '" + userName + "';";

If somebody puts

' or '1'='1

as userName, your PreparedStatement will be vulnerable to SQL injection, since that query will be executed on database as

SELECT * FROM users WHERE name = '' OR '1'='1';

So, if you use

preparedStatement = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE name = ?";
preparedStatement.setString(1, userName);

you will be safe.

Some of this code taken from this Wikipedia article.

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    Does the setString make any difference? what it actually does? Even thats going to substitute the string inplace. What different it makes? Dec 2, 2010 at 9:21
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    @Mohamed: it makes a difference. The query "SELECT * FROM users WHERE name = ?" will be sent to the database where it's compiled and then userName from setString will be substituted. If the database sees an illegal value, it will throw an error. So, ' or '1'='1 will be treated as a whole string, and not as a statement involving operators or and =. The database will see it as a string with value "' or '1'='1".
    – darioo
    Dec 2, 2010 at 9:24
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The prepared statement, if used properly, does protect against SQL injection. But please post a code example to your question, so we can see if you are using it properly.

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Well simply using PreparedStatement doesn't make you safe. You have to use parameters in your SQL query which is possible with PreparedStatement. Look here for more information.

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The PreparedStatement alone does not help you if you are still concatenating Strings.

For instance, one rogue attacker can still do the following:

  • call a sleep function so that all your database connections will be busy, therefore making your application unavailable
  • extracting sensitive data from the DB
  • bypassing the user authentication

And it's not just SQL that can b affected. Even JPQL can be compromised if you are not using bind parameters.

Bottom line, you should never use string concatenation when building SQL statements. Use a dedicated API for that purpose:

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