288

My code works fine for normal devices but creates blurry images on retina devices.

Does anybody know a solution for my issue?

+ (UIImage *) imageWithView:(UIView *)view
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(view.bounds.size);
    [view.layer renderInContext:UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()];

    UIImage * img = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();

    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return img;
}
  • Ugly, in what way? – Marcelo Cantos Dec 2 '10 at 11:05
  • blurry. It seems to me the right scale got lost... – Daniel Dec 2 '10 at 12:12
  • me too. met the same issue. – RainCast Jul 20 '16 at 23:45
  • Where are you displaying the result image? As others have explained, I believe you are rendering the view onto an image with scale 1, while your device has scale 2 or 3. So you are downscaling to a lower resolution. This is a loss of quality but should not blur. But when you are looking at this image again (on the same screen?) on a device with scale 2 it will convert from the low resolution to higher, using 2 pixels per pixel in the screenshot. This upscaling uses interpolation most likely (default on iOS), averaging color values for the extra pixels. – Hans Terje Bakke Jan 9 at 15:24

16 Answers 16

648

Switch from use of UIGraphicsBeginImageContext to UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions (as documented on this page). Pass 0.0 for scale (the third argument) and you'll get a context with a scale factor equal to that of the screen.

UIGraphicsBeginImageContext uses a fixed scale factor of 1.0, so you're actually getting exactly the same image on an iPhone 4 as on the other iPhones. I'll bet either the iPhone 4 is applying a filter when you implicitly scale it up or just your brain is picking up on it being less sharp than everything around it.

So, I guess:

#import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h>

+ (UIImage *)imageWithView:(UIView *)view
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(view.bounds.size, view.opaque, 0.0);
    [view.layer renderInContext:UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()];

    UIImage * img = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();

    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return img;
}

And in Swift 4:

func image(with view: UIView) -> UIImage? {
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(view.bounds.size, view.isOpaque, 0.0)
    defer { UIGraphicsEndImageContext() }
    if let context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext() {
        view.layer.render(in: context)
        let image = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
        return image
    }
    return nil
}
  • 3
    This works great for me! Thanks. – Daniel Dec 2 '10 at 13:19
  • 6
    Tommy answer is fine , but you still need to import #import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h> to remove renderInContext: warning . – gwdp May 10 '11 at 3:29
  • 6
    Instead of using the 0.0f for the scale parameter, is it more acceptable to use [[UIScreen mainScreen] scale], it works too. – Adam Carter Aug 14 '12 at 17:06
  • 18
    @Adam Carter scale: The scale factor to apply to the bitmap. If you specify a value of 0.0, the scale factor is set to the scale factor of the device’s main screen. It's explicitly documented, so 0.0f is simpler and better in my opinion. – cprcrack Oct 24 '13 at 11:36
  • 5
    This answer is out of date for iOS 7. See my answer for the new "best" method to do this. – Dima Mar 19 '14 at 2:18
210

The currently accepted answer is now out of date, at least if you are supporting iOS 7.

Here is what you should be using if you are only supporting iOS7+:

+ (UIImage *) imageWithView:(UIView *)view
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(view.bounds.size, view.opaque, 0.0f);
    [view drawViewHierarchyInRect:view.bounds afterScreenUpdates:NO];
    UIImage * snapshotImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return snapshotImage;
}

Swift 4:

func imageWithView(view: UIView) -> UIImage? {
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(view.bounds.size, view.isOpaque, 0.0)
    defer { UIGraphicsEndImageContext() }
    view.drawHierarchy(in: view.bounds, afterScreenUpdates: true)
    return UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
}

As per this article, you can see that the new iOS7 method drawViewHierarchyInRect:afterScreenUpdates: is many times faster than renderInContext:. benchmark

  • 5
    There is no doubt, that drawViewHierarchyInRect:afterScreenUpdates: is a lot faster. I just ran a Time profiler in Instruments. My image generation went from 138ms to 27ms. – Thomas Clemensen Jul 21 '14 at 7:09
  • 9
    For some reason this didn't work for me when I was trying to create custom icons for Google Maps markers; all I got was black rectangles :( – JakeP Sep 10 '14 at 8:44
  • 6
    @CarlosP have you tried setting afterScreenUpdates: to YES? – Dima Dec 11 '14 at 20:31
  • 7
    set afterScreenUpdates to YES fixed the black rectangle issue for me – hyouuu Jan 6 '15 at 10:40
  • 4
    I was also receiving black images. It turned out that if I call the code in viewDidLoad or viewWillAppear: the images are black; I had to do it in viewDidAppear:. So I also finally reverted to renderInContext:. – manicaesar Nov 16 '15 at 10:22
32

I have created a Swift extension based on @Dima solution:

extension UIImage {
    class func imageWithView(view: UIView) -> UIImage {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(view.bounds.size, view.opaque, 0.0)
        view.drawViewHierarchyInRect(view.bounds, afterScreenUpdates: true)
        let img = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
        UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
        return img
    }
}

EDIT: Swift 4 improved version

extension UIImage {
    class func imageWithView(_ view: UIView) -> UIImage {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(view.bounds.size, view.isOpaque, 0)
        defer { UIGraphicsEndImageContext() }
        view.drawHierarchy(in: view.bounds, afterScreenUpdates: true)
        return UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext() ?? UIImage()
    }
}

Usage:

let view = UIView(frame: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: 100, height: 100))  
let image = UIImage.imageWithView(view)
  • 2
    Thanks for the idea! Just as an aside, you can also defer { UIGraphicsEndImageContext() } immediately after beginning the context and avoid having to introduce the local variable img ;) – Dennis L Jan 17 '16 at 1:03
  • Thanks so much for the well-detailed explanation and usage! – Zeus Sep 21 '18 at 3:03
24

To improve answers by @Tommy and @Dima, use the following category to render UIView into UIImage with transparent background and without loss of quality. Working on iOS7. (Or just reuse that method in implementation, replacing self reference with your image)

UIView+RenderViewToImage.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface UIView (RenderToImage)

- (UIImage *)imageByRenderingView;

@end

UIView+RenderViewToImage.m

#import "UIView+RenderViewToImage.h"

@implementation UIView (RenderViewToImage)

- (UIImage *)imageByRenderingView
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.bounds.size, NO, 0.0);
    [self drawViewHierarchyInRect:self.bounds afterScreenUpdates:YES];
    UIImage * snapshotImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return snapshotImage;
}

@end
  • 1
    If I use drawViewHierarchyInRect with afterScreenUpdates:YES my image aspect ratio has changed and the image get distorted. – confile Apr 21 '15 at 9:54
  • Does this happen when your uiview content is changed? If yes then try to re-generate this UIImage again. Sorry can't test this myself because I'm on phone – Glogo Apr 21 '15 at 12:15
  • I have the same problem and seems like no one has noticed this, did you find any solution to this problem? @confile ? – Reza.Ab Jun 5 '17 at 15:38
  • This is just what I need but it didn't work. I tried making @interface and @implementation both (RenderViewToImage) and adding #import "UIView+RenderViewToImage.h" to the header in ViewController.h so is this the correct usage ? e.g. UIImageView *test = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:[self imageByRenderingView]]; [self addSubview:test]; ? – Greg Feb 24 '18 at 5:05
  • and this method in ViewController.m was the view I tried to render - (UIView *)testView { UIView *v1 = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(50, 50, 50, 50)]; v1.backgroundColor = [UIColor redColor]; UIView *v2 = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(50, 50, 150, 150)]; v2.backgroundColor = [UIColor blueColor]; [v2 addSubview:v1]; return v2; } – Greg Feb 24 '18 at 5:13
21

iOS Swift

Using modern UIGraphicsImageRenderer

public extension UIView {
    @available(iOS 10.0, *)
    public func renderToImage(afterScreenUpdates: Bool = false) -> UIImage {
        let rendererFormat = UIGraphicsImageRendererFormat.default()
        rendererFormat.opaque = isOpaque
        let renderer = UIGraphicsImageRenderer(size: bounds.size, format: rendererFormat)

        let snapshotImage = renderer.image { _ in
            drawHierarchy(in: bounds, afterScreenUpdates: afterScreenUpdates)
        }
        return snapshotImage
    }
}
  • thanks! works... although i dont see any difference – masaldana2 Jun 15 '18 at 9:15
  • @masaldana2 maybe not yet, but as soon as they start deprecating stuff or adding hardware accelerated rendering or improvements you better be on giants shoulders (AKA using last Apple APIs) – Juan Boero Apr 9 at 20:45
15

Swift 3

The Swift 3 solution (based on Dima's answer) with UIView extension should be like this:

extension UIView {
    public func getSnapshotImage() -> UIImage {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.bounds.size, self.isOpaque, 0)
        self.drawHierarchy(in: self.bounds, afterScreenUpdates: false)
        let snapshotImage: UIImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()!
        UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
        return snapshotImage
    }
}
6

Drop-in Swift 3.0 extension that supports the new iOS 10.0 API & the previous method.

Note:

  • iOS version check
  • Note the use of defer to simplify the context cleanup.
  • Will also apply the opacity & current scale of the view.
  • Nothing is just unwrapped using ! which could cause a crash.

extension UIView
{
    public func renderToImage(afterScreenUpdates: Bool = false) -> UIImage?
    {
        if #available(iOS 10.0, *)
        {
            let rendererFormat = UIGraphicsImageRendererFormat.default()
            rendererFormat.scale = self.layer.contentsScale
            rendererFormat.opaque = self.isOpaque
            let renderer = UIGraphicsImageRenderer(size: self.bounds.size, format: rendererFormat)

            return
                renderer.image
                {
                    _ in

                    self.drawHierarchy(in: self.bounds, afterScreenUpdates: afterScreenUpdates)
                }
        }
        else
        {
            UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.bounds.size, self.isOpaque, self.layer.contentsScale)
            defer
            {
                UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
            }

            self.drawHierarchy(in: self.bounds, afterScreenUpdates: afterScreenUpdates)

            return UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
        }
    }
}
5

Swift 2.0:

Using extension method:

extension UIImage{

   class func renderUIViewToImage(viewToBeRendered:UIView?) -> UIImage
   {
       UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions((viewToBeRendered?.bounds.size)!, false, 0.0)
       viewToBeRendered!.drawViewHierarchyInRect(viewToBeRendered!.bounds, afterScreenUpdates: true)
       viewToBeRendered!.layer.renderInContext(UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()!)

       let finalImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
       UIGraphicsEndImageContext()

       return finalImage
   }

}

Usage:

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    //Sample View To Self.view
    let sampleView = UIView(frame: CGRectMake(100,100,200,200))
    sampleView.backgroundColor =  UIColor(patternImage: UIImage(named: "ic_120x120")!)
    self.view.addSubview(sampleView)    

    //ImageView With Image
    let sampleImageView = UIImageView(frame: CGRectMake(100,400,200,200))

    //sampleView is rendered to sampleImage
    var sampleImage = UIImage.renderUIViewToImage(sampleView)

    sampleImageView.image = sampleImage
    self.view.addSubview(sampleImageView)

 }
3

Swift 3.0 implementation

extension UIView {
    func getSnapshotImage() -> UIImage {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(bounds.size, isOpaque, 0)
        drawHierarchy(in: bounds, afterScreenUpdates: false)
        let snapshotImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()!
        UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
        return snapshotImage
    }
}
3

All Swift 3 answers did not worked for me so I have translated the most accepted answer:

extension UIImage {
    class func imageWithView(view: UIView) -> UIImage {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(view.bounds.size, view.isOpaque, 0.0)
        view.layer.render(in: UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()!)
        let img: UIImage? = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
        UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
        return img!
    }
}
1

Here's a Swift 4 UIView extension based on the answer from @Dima.

extension UIView {

   func image () -> UIImage?
   {
       UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(bounds.size, isOpaque, 0)

       drawHierarchy(in: bounds, afterScreenUpdates: false)

       let image = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()

       UIGraphicsEndImageContext()

       return image
   }
}
0

Some times drawRect Method makes problem so I got these answers more appropriate. You too may have a look on it Capture UIImage of UIView stuck in DrawRect method

0
- (UIImage*)screenshotForView:(UIView *)view
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(view.bounds.size);
    [view.layer renderInContext:UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()];
    UIImage *image = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    // hack, helps w/ our colors when blurring
    NSData *imageData = UIImageJPEGRepresentation(image, 1); // convert to jpeg
    image = [UIImage imageWithData:imageData];

    return image;
}
0

UIGraphicsImageRenderer is a relatively new API, introduced in iOS 10. You construct a UIGraphicsImageRenderer by specifying a point size. The image method takes a closure argument and returns a bitmap that results from executing the passed closure. In this case, the result is the original image scaled down to draw within the specified bounds.

https://nshipster.com/image-resizing/

So be sure the size you are passing into UIGraphicsImageRenderer is points, not pixels.

If your images are larger than you are expecting, you need to divide your size by the scale factor.

-2

In this method just pass a view object and it will returns a UIImage object.

-(UIImage*)getUIImageFromView:(UIView*)yourView
{
 UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(yourView.bounds.size);
 [yourView.layer renderInContext:UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()];
 UIImage *image = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
 UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
 return image;
}
-7

Add this to method to UIView Category

- (UIImage*) capture {
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(self.bounds.size);
    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
    [self.layer renderInContext:context];
    UIImage *img = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return img;
}
  • 2
    Hiya there, while this may well answer the question, please be aware that other users might not be as knowledgeable as you. Why don't you add a little explanation as to why this code works? Thanks! – Vogel612 Apr 21 '15 at 10:54

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