103

As the title, is there any way to call a function after delay (1 second for example) in Kotlin?

86

You can use Schedule

inline fun Timer.schedule(
    delay: Long, 
    crossinline action: TimerTask.() -> Unit
): TimerTask (source)

example (thanks @Nguyen Minh Binh - found it here: http://jamie.mccrindle.org/2013/02/exploring-kotlin-standard-library-part-3.html)

import java.util.Timer
import kotlin.concurrent.schedule

Timer("SettingUp", false).schedule(500) { 
   doSomething()
}
  • 13
    Thanks! Super easy. Found an example here jamie.mccrindle.org/2013/02/… Timer("SettingUp", false).schedule(500) { doSomething() } – Nguyen Minh Binh Apr 11 '17 at 14:35
  • 7
    It does compile, if you add these two imports: import java.util.Timer and import kotlin.concurrent.schedule – Customizer Dec 31 '17 at 0:29
  • 3
    @Matias Elorriaga, for me, putting this on a new brand file doesn't compile, even adding the imports Customizer said – Sulfkain Jan 16 '18 at 9:09
  • 3
    you don't need to put it on a file, that method is part of stdlib, follow the link in the first line of the answer, – Matias Elorriaga Jan 16 '18 at 13:38
  • 2
    for those that would like to have it run at an interval: timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(0, inactivityHeartbeat) { //.... do stuff} – Bart Burg Sep 20 '18 at 11:00
133

There is also an option to use Handler -> postDelayed

 Handler().postDelayed({
                    //doSomethingHere()
                }, 1000)
  • 10
    Please add that it is only available on android, since the question asks for a general kotlin method (although it does have the Android tag) – Yoav Sternberg Apr 20 '17 at 13:43
  • 4
    It's not constructive from your side. As a result when users will search android tag might think that this is wrong answer. – Bogdan Ustyak Apr 20 '17 at 20:27
  • 8
    For Android, it's better to use Handler than Timer : stackoverflow.com/questions/20330355/timertask-or-handler – woprandi Apr 20 '18 at 13:54
  • I think, you should add a code for removing handlers after activity/fragment finish. – CoolMind Jan 30 at 7:37
  • This will not run on the UI thread if you intended on doing that. – AndroidDev Aug 24 at 6:37
43

Many Ways

1. Using Handler class

Handler().postDelayed({
    TODO("Do something")
    }, 2000)

2. Using Timer class

Timer().schedule(object : TimerTask() {
    override fun run() {
        TODO("Do something")
    }
}, 2000)

Shorter

Timer().schedule(timerTask {
    TODO("Do something")
}, 2000)

Shortest

Timer().schedule(2000) {
    TODO("Do something")
}

3. Using Executors class

Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor().schedule({
    TODO("Do something")
}, 2, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
30

You have to import the following two libraries:

import java.util.*
import kotlin.concurrent.schedule

and after that use it in this way:

Timer().schedule(10000){
    //do something
}
16
val timer = Timer()
timer.schedule(timerTask { nextScreen() }, 3000)
  • 1
    Can you please explain me why I there's need to write "timerTask" instead of just braces? – Hugo Passos Dec 22 '17 at 7:49
  • 2
    @HugoCastelani: You don't need to.. – Andrew Odendaal Feb 6 '18 at 15:16
  • 2
    I think you do. Timer.schedule() expects a TimerTask as it's first argument. kotlin.concurrent.timerTask() wraps the given lambda in a TimerTask instance. See here: kotlinlang.org/api/latest/jvm/stdlib/kotlin.concurrent/… – Blieque Mar 27 '18 at 17:18
  • Also, the given example can be condensed to one line if the Timer object isn't going to be used more than once, e.g., Timer().schedule(timerTask { ... }, 3000). A more Kotlin-friendly option is available too; see jonguer's answer. – Blieque Mar 27 '18 at 17:20
16

You could launch a coroutine, delay it and then call the function:

 /*GlobalScope.*/launch {
   delay(1000)
   yourFn()
 }

If you are outside of a class or object prepend GlobalScope to let the coroutine run there, otherwise it is recommended to implement the CoroutineScope in the surrounding class, which allows to cancel all coroutines associated to that scope if necessary.

  • Thanks! Strange, that coroutines were mentioned only in 2018. – CoolMind Jan 30 at 7:29
  • @coolMind they are stable since a few months, so they are quite new ... – Jonas Wilms Jan 30 at 9:52
  • Yes, from October-November, but existed before. – CoolMind Jan 30 at 9:54
8

A simple example to show a toast after 3 seconds :

fun onBtnClick() {
    val handler = Handler()
    handler.postDelayed({ showToast() }, 3000)
}

fun showToast(){
    Toast.makeText(context, "Its toast!", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show()
}
6

If you are looking for generic usage, here is my suggestion:

Create a class named as Run:

class Run {
    companion object {
        fun after(delay: Long, process: () -> Unit) {
            Handler().postDelayed({
                process()
            }, delay)
        }
    }
}

And use like this:

Run.after(1000, {
    // print something useful etc.
})
  • 1
    this work fine here, thanks man! – Armando Marques Sobrinho Oct 31 at 0:24
  • You can simplify this as extension fucntion – Vlad Nov 10 at 10:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.