I'm currently working on making Rust-lang parsable with Rascal. The originally used syntax is made for Bison and so I'm translating it to be usable. The stumbling blocks that I have reached are the expressions. Rust has four types of expressions in its Bison file and those are nonblock_expr, expr, nonparen_expr and expr_nostruct. My existing translations are full of ambiguities but even after reading the Rascal documentation about the topic and the available syntax for Rascal and Java, I'm not sure how to solve this problem. I would like to fix the ambiguities and better understand how this problem could be fixed further.

Here is an example of my translation:

syntax Expression
    = Literal
    > Path_expression
    | "self"
    | Macro_expression
    | Path_expression "{" Structure_expression_fields "}"
    | Expression "." Path_generic_args_with_colons
    //> left Expression "." Literal_integer
    | Expression "[" Expression? "]"
    | Expression "(" (Expressions ","?)? ")"
    | "(" (Expressions ","?)? ")"
    | "[" Vector_expression "]"
    | "continue"
    | "continue" Identifier
    | "return"
    | "return" Expression
    | "break"
    | "break" Identifier
    > left  ( Expression "*" Expression
            | Expression "/" Expression
            | Expression "%" Expression
            )
    > left  ( Expression "+" Expression
            | Expression "-" Expression
            > Expression "\<\<" Expression
            | Expression "\>\>" Expression
            > Expression "&" Expression
            > Expression "^" Expression
            > Expression "|" Expression
            > Expression "\<" Expression
            | Expression "\>" Expression
            | Expression "\<=" Expression
            | Expression "\>=" Expression
            > Expression "==" Expression
            | Expression "!=" Expression
            > Expression "||" Expression
            > Expression "&&" Expression
            )
    > right Expression "\<-" Expression
    > right ( Expression "=" Expression
            | Expression "\<\<=" Expression
            | Expression "\>\>=" Expression
            | Expression "-=" Expression
            | Expression "&=" Expression
            | Expression "|=" Expression
            | Expression "+=" Expression
            | Expression "*=" Expression
            | Expression "/=" Expression
            | Expression "^=" Expression
            | Expression "%=" Expression
            )
    | Expression ".."
    | Expression ".." Expression
    | ".." Expression
    | ".."
    | Expression "as" Type
    | "box" Nonparen_expression
    > "box" "(" Expression? ")" Expression
    | Expression_qualified_path
    | Block_expression
    | Block
    | Nonblock_prefix_expression
    ;

Sources:

Rust Bison file: Github Rust

Oxidize Rascal file: Github Oxidize

Added ambiguity example This is an example of an input file (just the ambiguous part of a file being in the parameters of parse).

fn main() {
    let mut config = Config::parse(&flags.build, flags.config.clone());
}

The output parse tree as seen bellow seems to be confused about the construction of the prefixed expression (&). This ambiguity can't decide between the Nonblock_prefix_expression and Expression "." Path_generic_args_with_colons. I expect it to parse through the Nonblock_prefix_expression. enter image description here

  • Hi Adrian, the question is very broad in a way. I'll give a very specific answer to make the next step, but we should also exchange thoughts on the general ideas behind disambiguation. See meta-environment.org/doc/books/syntax/sdf-disambiguation/… for an step-by-step overview with explanations. – jurgenv Apr 12 '17 at 9:59
  • I see some ambiguity in this grammar, when keywords would not be reserved from identifiers, like box and self. – jurgenv Apr 12 '17 at 10:06
  • @jurgenv I'll read-up on the disambiguation. What do you mean with "not reserved"? The Rust keywords have been excluded from the identifier scope (Identifier \ Rust_keywords). This is not present in this example but I could update it. – Adrian Z. Apr 12 '17 at 11:00
  • Perhaps it would be nice to give an example of a small expression that is ambiguous? And how you would expect that to be parsed? – Davy Landman Apr 12 '17 at 11:02
  • I updated the question with an example. – Adrian Z. Apr 12 '17 at 11:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • Have a look at http://www.meta-environment.org/doc/books/syntax/sdf-disambiguation/sdf-disambiguation.pdf for the general concept of disambiguation and how to approach resolving ambiguity in a step-by-step fashion. This manual was written for SDF2, which has many commonalities with Rascal. Watch out for the differences though, {prefer} and {avoid} are not present in Rascal, but can be simulated with a library (not advised).
  • The DrAmbiguity tool can help automating diagnostics for ambiguity: import analysis::grammars::Ambiguity; and diagnose(yourAmbiguousTree), it explains in a pretty raw form what the differences and commonalities are between different alternative parse trees for the same sub-string. The differences are the cause of the ambiguity: rules and orders of rule application which are used in the one alternative but not in the other. The cause can be removed by applying disambiguation filters which remove only one of the two alternatives (so they focus on the differences)
  • If you have concrete ambiguities with example input sentence and output trees (as small as possible), we can help on stackoverflow.com
  • I have been using DrAmbiguity but the output of it is not always clear to me. I'll try to use it again with a few examples. I'll add a ambiguity example in a few minutes. – Adrian Z. Apr 12 '17 at 11:03
  • 2
    You can simplify this to the following ambiguous example: &flags.build. The grammar is highly stratified which makes it a bit confusing to follow. The immediate issue is that it is unclear whether to parse this as (&(flags.build)) or (&flags).build, since both are allowed by the grammar and both have the same precedence. – Mark Hills Apr 13 '17 at 1:25
  • 1
    This has been solved by making better use of Rascal functionality, combining all the mentioned expressions and lookahead on single operators which could have a double operator version (example of & and &&). github.com/zborowa/oxidize/blob/master/src/lang/rust/syntax/… – Adrian Z. Jun 19 '17 at 11:30

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