432

Hibernate throws this exception during SessionFactory creation:

org.hibernate.loader.MultipleBagFetchException: cannot simultaneously fetch multiple bags

This is my test case:

Parent.java

@Entity
public Parent {

 @Id
 @GeneratedValue(strategy=GenerationType.IDENTITY)
 private Long id;

 @OneToMany(mappedBy="parent", fetch=FetchType.EAGER)
 // @IndexColumn(name="INDEX_COL") if I had this the problem solve but I retrieve more children than I have, one child is null.
 private List<Child> children;

}

Child.java

@Entity
public Child {

 @Id
 @GeneratedValue(strategy=GenerationType.IDENTITY)
 private Long id;

 @ManyToOne
 private Parent parent;

}

How about this problem? What can I do?


EDIT

OK, the problem I have is that another "parent" entity is inside my parent, my real behavior is this:

Parent.java

@Entity
public Parent {

 @Id
 @GeneratedValue(strategy=GenerationType.IDENTITY)
 private Long id;

 @ManyToOne
 private AntoherParent anotherParent;

 @OneToMany(mappedBy="parent", fetch=FetchType.EAGER)
 private List<Child> children;

}

AnotherParent.java

@Entity
public AntoherParent {

 @Id
 @GeneratedValue(strategy=GenerationType.IDENTITY)
 private Long id;

 @OneToMany(mappedBy="parent", fetch=FetchType.EAGER)
 private List<AnotherChild> anotherChildren;

}

Hibernate doesn't like two collections with FetchType.EAGER, but this seems to be a bug, I'm not doing unusual things...

Removing FetchType.EAGER from Parent or AnotherParent solves the problem, but I need it, so real solution is to use @LazyCollection(LazyCollectionOption.FALSE) instead of FetchType (thanks to Bozho for the solution).

  • I would ask, what SQL query are you hoping to generate that will retrieve two separate collections simultaneously? The kinds of SQL that would be able to achieve these would either require a cartesian join (potentially highly inefficient) or a UNION of disjoint columns (also ugly). Presumably the inability to achieve this in SQL in a clean & efficient manner influenced the API design. – Thomas W Jan 16 '18 at 0:47
  • @ThomasW These are the sql queries it should generate: select * from master; select * from child1 where master_id = :master_id; select * from child2 where master_id = :master_id – nurettin Oct 14 '18 at 12:28

12 Answers 12

516

I think a newer version of hibernate (supporting JPA 2.0) should handle this. But otherwise you can work it around by annotating the collection fields with:

@LazyCollection(LazyCollectionOption.FALSE)

Remember to remove the fetchType attribute from the @*ToMany annotation.

But note that in most cases a Set<Child> is more appropriate than List<Child>, so unless you really need a List - go for Set

  • 4
    odd, it has worked for me. Did you remove the fetchType from the @*ToMany ? – Bozho Dec 2 '10 at 17:51
  • 94
    the problem is that the JPA annotations are parsed not to allow more than 2 eagerly loaded collection. But the hibernate-specific annnotations allow it. – Bozho Dec 2 '10 at 23:27
  • 14
    The need for more than 1 EAGER seems totally realistic. Is this limitation just a JPA oversight? What are the concerns I should look for when having muliple EAGERs? – AR3Y35 Jun 17 '12 at 11:18
  • 6
    the thing is, hibernate can't fetch the two collections with one query. So when you query for the parent entity, it will need 2 extra queries per result, which is normally something you don't want. – Bozho Jun 18 '12 at 11:19
  • 7
    It'd be great to have an explanation as to why this resolves the issue. – Webnet Sep 24 '13 at 13:29
281

Simply change from List type to Set type.

  • 41
    A List and a Set are not the same thing: a set does not preserve order – Matteo Mar 15 '12 at 15:36
  • 17
    LinkedHashSet preserves order – egallardo May 16 '12 at 0:12
  • 15
    This is an important distinction and, when you think about it, entirely correct. The typical many-to-one implemented by a foreign key in the DB is really not a List, it's a Set because order is not preserved. So Set is really more appropriate. I think that makes the difference in hibernate, though I don't know why. – fool4jesus Dec 6 '12 at 19:38
  • 3
    I was having the same cannot simultaneously fetch multiple bags but not because of annotations. In my case, I was doing left joins and disjunctions with the two *ToMany. Changing the type to Set solved my problem too. Excellent and neat solution. This should be the official answer. – L. Holanda Oct 15 '14 at 20:22
  • 17
    I liked the answer, but the million dollar question is: Why? Why with Set don't show exceptions? Thanks – Hinotori Jan 31 '17 at 16:56
125

Add a Hibernate-specific @Fetch annotation to your code:

@OneToMany(mappedBy="parent", fetch=FetchType.EAGER)
@Fetch(value = FetchMode.SUBSELECT)
private List<Child> childs;

This should fix the issue, related to Hibernate bug HHH-1718

  • 5
    @DaveRlz why subSelect solves this problem. I tried your solution and its working, but dont know how the problem was solved by using this ? – HakunaMatata Aug 10 '13 at 13:34
  • This is the best answer unless a Set really makes sense. Having a single OneToMany relationship using a Set results in 1+<# relationships> queries, where as using FetchMode.SUBSELECT results in 1+1 queries. Also, using the annotation in the accepted answer (LazyCollectionOption.FALSE) causes even more queries to be executed. – mstrthealias Apr 21 '15 at 22:35
  • 1
    FetchType.EAGER is not a proper solution for this. Need to proceed with Hibernate Fetch Profiles and need to solve it – Milinda Bandara Jul 26 '17 at 15:31
  • 2
    The two other top answers did not solve my problem. This one did. Thank you! – Blindworks Feb 22 '18 at 11:48
  • 3
    Does anyone know why does SUBSELECT fix it, but JOIN does not? – Innokenty Jan 4 at 16:23
28

After trying with every single option describe in this posts and others, I came to the conclusion that the the fix is a follows.

In every XToMany place @XXXToMany(mappedBy="parent", fetch=FetchType.EAGER) and intermediately after

@Fetch(value = FetchMode.SUBSELECT)

This worked for me

  • 4
    adding @Fetch(value = FetchMode.SUBSELECT) was enough – user2601995 Feb 25 '15 at 20:44
  • 1
    This is a Hibernate only solution. What if you are using a shared JPA library? – Michel May 30 '17 at 9:34
  • 2
    I'm sure you didnt mean to, but DaveRlz already wrote the same thing 3 years earlier – phil294 Apr 29 '18 at 9:10
20

To fix it simply take Set in place of List for your nested object.

@OneToMany
Set<Your_object> objectList;

and don't forget to use fetch=FetchType.EAGER

it will work.

There is one more concept CollectionId in Hibernate if you want to stick with list only.

11

I found a good Blog post about the behaviour of Hibernate in this kind of object mappings: http://blog.eyallupu.com/2010/06/hibernate-exception-simultaneously.html

10

This question has been a recurring theme on both StackOverflow or the Hibernate forum, so I decided to turn the answer into an article as well.

Considering we have the following entities:

enter image description here

And, you want to fetch some parent Post entities along with all the comments and tags collections.

If you are using more than one JOIN FETCH directives:

List<Post> posts = entityManager
.createQuery(
    "select p " +
    "from Post p " +
    "left join fetch p.comments " +
    "left join fetch p.tags " +
    "where p.id between :minId and :maxId", Post.class)
.setParameter("minId", 1L)
.setParameter("maxId", 50L)
.getResultList();

Hibernate will throw the infamous:

org.hibernate.loader.MultipleBagFetchException: cannot simultaneously fetch multiple bags [
  com.vladmihalcea.book.hpjp.hibernate.fetching.Post.comments,
  com.vladmihalcea.book.hpjp.hibernate.fetching.Post.tags
]

Hibernate doesn't allow fetching more than one bag because that would generate a Cartesian product.

The worst "solution"

Now, you will find lots of answers, blog posts, videos, or other resources telling you to use a Set instead of a List for your collections.

That's terrible advice. Don't do that!

Using Sets instead of Lists will make the MultipleBagFetchException go away, but the Cartesian Product will still be there, which is actually even worse, as you'll find out the performance issue long after you applied this "fix".

The proper solution

You can do the following trick:

List<Post> posts = entityManager
.createQuery(
    "select distinct p " +
    "from Post p " +
    "left join fetch p.comments " +
    "where p.id between :minId and :maxId ", Post.class)
.setParameter("minId", 1L)
.setParameter("maxId", 50L)
.setHint(QueryHints.PASS_DISTINCT_THROUGH, false)
.getResultList();

posts = entityManager
.createQuery(
    "select distinct p " +
    "from Post p " +
    "left join fetch p.tags t " +
    "where p in :posts ", Post.class)
.setParameter("posts", posts)
.setHint(QueryHints.PASS_DISTINCT_THROUGH, false)
.getResultList();

In the first JPQL query, distinct DOES NOT go to the SQL statement. That's why we set the PASS_DISTINCT_THROUGH JPA query hint to false.

DISTINCT has two meanings in JPQL, and here, we need it to deduplicate the Java object references returned by getResultList on the Java side, not the SQL side. Check out this article for more details.

As long as you fetch at most one collection using JOIN FETCH, you will be fine.

By using multiple queries, you will avoid the Cartesian Product since any other collection but the first one is fetched using a secondary query.

There's more you could do

If you're using the FetchType.EAGER strategy at mapping time for @OneToMany or @ManyToMany associations, then you could easily end up with a MultipleBagFetchException.

You are better off switching from FetchType.EAGER to Fetchype.LAZY since eager fetching is a terrible idea that can lead to critical application performance issues.

Conclusion

Avoid FetchTYpe.EAGER and don't switch from List to Set just because doing so will make Hibernate hide the MultipleBagFetchException under the carpet. Fetch just one collection at a time, and you'll be fine.

As long as you do it with the same number of queries as you have collections to initialize, you are fine. Just don't initialize the collections in a loop, as that will trigger N+1 query issues, which are also bad for performance.

  • Thanks for the shared knowledge. However, DISTINCT is performance killer in this solution. Is there a way to get rid of distinct? (tried to return Set<...> instead, didn't help much) – Leonid Dashko Nov 18 at 11:31
  • 1
    DISTINCT does not go to the SQL statement. That's why PASS_DISTINCT_THROUGH is set to false. DISTINCT has 2 meanings in JPQL, and here , we need it to deduplicate on the Java side, not the SQL side. Check out this article for more details. – Vlad Mihalcea Nov 18 at 12:04
  • Vlad, thanks for the help I find it really usuful. However, the issue was related to hibernate.jdbc.fetch_size (eventually I set it to 350). By the chance, do you know how to optimize nested relations? E.g. entity1 -> entity2 -> entity3.1, entity 3.2 (where entity3.1 / 3.2 are @OneToMany relations) – Leonid Dashko Nov 21 at 12:54
  • 1
    @LeonidDashko Check out the Fetching chapter in my High-Performance Java Persistence book for many tips related to fetching data. – Vlad Mihalcea Nov 21 at 13:34
6

you can keep booth EAGER lists in JPA and add to at least one of them the JPA annotation @OrderColumn (with obviously the name of a field to be ordered). No need of specific hibernate annotations. But keep in mind it could create empty elements in the list if the chosen field does not have values starting from 0

 [...]
 @OneToMany(mappedBy="parent", fetch=FetchType.EAGER)
 @OrderColumn(name="orderIndex")
 private List<Child> children;
 [...]

in Children then you should add the orderIndex field

1

When you have too complex objects with saveral collection could not be good idea to have all of them with EAGER fetchType, better use LAZY and when you really need to load the collections use: Hibernate.initialize(parent.child) to fetch the data.

1

We tried Set instead of List and it is a nightmare: when you add two new objects, equals() and hashCode() fail to distinguish both of them ! Because they don't have any id.

typical tools like Eclipse generate that kind of code from Database tables:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    final int prime = 31;
    int result = 1;
    result = prime * result + ((id == null) ? 0 : id.hashCode());
    return result;
}

You may also read this article that explains properly how messed up JPA/Hibernate is. After reading this, I think this is the last time I use any ORM in my life.

I've also encounter Domain Driven Design guys that basically say ORM are a terrible thing.

0

For me, the problem was having nested EAGER fetches.

One solution is to set the nested fields to LAZY and use Hibernate.initialize() to load the nested field(s):

x = session.get(ClassName.class, id);
Hibernate.initialize(x.getNestedField());
-4

You could use a new annotation to solve this:

@XXXToXXX(targetEntity = XXXX.class, fetch = FetchType.LAZY)

In fact, fetch's default value is FetchType.LAZY too.

  • 4
    JPA3.0 does not exist. – holmis83 Aug 17 '17 at 12:57

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