7

I wonder if there's a better approach to load async data into a property. now I create an async function and raise a Task in the Get part of the property like this:

private ObservableCollection<CProyecto> prope;

public ObservableCollection<CProyecto> Prope
{
    get 
    {
        if (prope == null)
        {
            Task.Run(()=> LoadData()).Wait();
        }

        return proyectos;
    }
    set 
    { 
        prope = value; 
        RaisePropertyChanged(); 
    }
}

async private Task LoadData() 
{
    Prope = await clsStaticClassDataLoader.GetDataFromWebService();
}

This approach works, but I don't like the use of .Wait, because that can freeze the screen if the service doesn´t respond fast.

Can you please guide me on this matter?

thanks in advance

5
  • 1
    What's the point of starting a new task if you call the Wait() method to block the calling thread anyway....?
    – mm8
    Apr 12 '17 at 12:01
  • Regarding async properties you should read this: blog.stephencleary.com/2013/01/async-oop-3-properties.html
    – mm8
    Apr 12 '17 at 12:02
  • Use a loaded event to fetch data from external source. Make the event async and bind to your collection.
    – Eldho
    Apr 12 '17 at 12:14
  • 1
    Worst. Property. Ever.
    – user1228
    Apr 12 '17 at 14:05
  • Eldho, loaded_event? from the xaml page ? . thanks
    – KillemAll
    Apr 12 '17 at 19:59
11

I suggest you read my MSDN article on async MVVM data-binding. I have a library (github link) that provides a NotifyTask<T> type, which can be used as such:

public class MyClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
  public NotifyTask<ObservableCollection<CProyecto>> Prope { get; private set; }

  public MyClass()
  {
    // Synchronously *start* the operation.
    Prope = NotifyTask.Create(LoadDataAsync());
  }

  async private Task<ObservableCollection<CProyecto>> LoadDataAsync()
  {
    return await clsStaticClassDataLoader.GetDataFromWebService();
  }
}

Then your databinding would operate on Prope.Result.

The advantage of this approach is that you can also use databinding to hide/show busy indicators (Prope.IsNotCompleted), show controls when the data is available (Prope.IsSuccessfullyCompleted), and error notifications (Prope.IsFaulted / Prope.ErrorMessage).

Also, you can specify a non-null default value, if you wish:

Prope = NotifyTask.Create(LoadDataAsync(), new ObservableCollection<CProyecto>());
1
8

The way I handled this was to start the process of loading the property when the object was constructed, but I did not await the result. Since the property notifies when it is populated, the bindings worked just fine. Essentially it works like this:

public class MyClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private ObservableCollection<CProyecto> prope;

    public ObservableCollection<CProyecto> Prope
    {
        get { return prope; }
        set { prope = value; RaisePropertyChanged(nameof(Prope)); }
    }

    public MyClass()
    {
        // Don't wait or await.  When it's ready
        // the UI will get notified.
        LoadData();
    }

    async private Task LoadData() 
    {
        Prope = await clsStaticClassDataLoader.GetDataFromWebService();
    }
}

This works very well, and does not cause any delays or stuttering in the UI. If you want the collection to never be null (a good practice IMO), you can pre-initialize the prope field with an empty collection.

8
  • 4
    This is a good first step, but will silently swallow errors thrown by LoadData. A more comprehensive approach would have a top-level try/catch in LoadData and update your UI with an error notification. Apr 12 '17 at 13:46
  • 2
    Agreed. I am describing the approach I took. However, you have the correct location to do the error handling. Apr 12 '17 at 13:48
  • but you can not call async methods from a constructor, is the same problem with the property. You got this warning msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh873131.aspx
    – KillemAll
    Apr 12 '17 at 20:05
  • @KillemAll, you get the warning because you can't await the response. The goal here is not to await, but to start the process of loading the data. We get notified in another way that the work is done. Apr 12 '17 at 20:12
  • I did just like you said and the only way I got not warning is doing LoadData().wait(); or what I am missing?
    – KillemAll
    Apr 13 '17 at 13:30
0

Your current implementation of the Prope property doesn't make much sense. It is pointless to execute the LoadData method on a background thread since you block the main thread anyway when you call Wait(). You might as well call Wait() directly on the task returned by the LoadData() method:

//BAD IMPLEMENTATION!
private ObservableCollection<CProyecto> prope;
public ObservableCollection<CProyecto> Prope
{
    get
    {
        if (prope == null)
            LoadData().Wait();
        return proyectos;
    }
    set { prope = value; RaisePropertyChanged(); }
}

The above implementation is still a bad one. The getter of a property is not supposed to perform an asynchronous operation. You should read @Stephen Cleary's blog post on the subject: https://blog.stephencleary.com/2013/01/async-oop-3-properties.html

...and look into his NotifyTaskCompletion type in his AsyncEx library: https://github.com/StephenCleary/AsyncEx

1
  • Well It looks like don´t have sense but actually it have sense, if I don't do that the system hangs when I call my webservice,. I guess that is because the way I call the service var Response = client.GetAsync(url).Result;
    – KillemAll
    Apr 13 '17 at 1:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.