1

I'd like to achieve some type safety in the following situation.

Basically, I have different types of requests that are stored in a database, their type being identified with some string code. For business reasons, this code does not match the class names.

Each type of request include some sort of payload, the type of the payload directly depends on the type of request.

Here is a simplified version of what I have achieved so far:

trait Request[Payload] {
  def metadata: String // Not relevant
  def payload: Payload
}

case class RequestWithString(override val metadata: String, override val payload: String) extends Request[String]

case class AnotherTypeOfRequestWithString(override val metadata: String, override val payload: String) extends Request[String]

case class RequestWithInt(override val metadata: String, override val payload: Int) extends Request[Int]

object Request {
  def apply(code: String)(metadata: String, payload: Any): Request[_] = code match {
    case "S" => RequestWithString(metadata, payload.asInstanceOf[String])
    case "S2" => AnotherTypeOfRequestWithString(metadata, payload.asInstanceOf[String])
    case "I" => RequestWithInt(metadata, payload.asInstanceOf[Int])
  }
}

This is not satisfying as I would like Scala to infer the type of the payload to avoid casting, and the (parametered) type of the returned value.

What I am looking for is something like that:

object Request {
  def apply[P, R <: Request[P]](code: String)(metadata: String, payload: P): R = code match {
    case "S" => RequestWithString(metadata, payload)
    case "S2" => AnotherTypeOfRequestWithString(metadata, payload)
    case "I" => RequestWithInt(metadata, payload)
  }
}

But this does not seem to work, I can't get rid of some type mismatch errors:

 found   : P
 required: String
               case "S" => RequestWithString(metadata, payload)
                                                       ^

Shouldn't Scala infer that P is String in this case? What am I missing?

  • What further processing are you doing on each type of request? – Yuval Itzchakov Apr 12 '17 at 14:15
  • @YuvalItzchakov: MongoDB storage with ReactiveMongo, then composing a human-readable text from the payload and remote data, for sending the text to a remote system. I need to read/write to MongoDB, the main purpose of the Request.apply function is to be called in a BSONReader[Request]. – K. C. Apr 12 '17 at 14:57
  • Current answers are helping a lot. However, I edited to make it clearer that the type of Request does not only depend on the type of payload. There might be several Request subclasses with the same type of Payload. – K. C. Apr 13 '17 at 7:50
3

Move the matching decision logic to a typeclass:

// this typeclass holds the logic for creating a `Request` for
// a particular payload
sealed abstract class RequestPayloadType[T](val create: (String, T) => Request[T])
object RequestPayloadType {
  implicit object StringPayloadType extends RequestPayloadType[String] (RequestWithString.apply)
  implicit object IntPayloadType extends RequestPayloadType[Int] (RequestWithInt.apply)
}

object Request {
  def apply[P:RequestPayloadType](metadata: String, payload: P): Request[P] = 
    implicitly[RequestPayloadType[P]].create(metadata, payload)
}

Common pattern in scala: Move the code that requires knowledge of certain types, to a compilation unit that has that knowledge.

Keep in mind, it might be cleaner to not have individual request classes, and just have a single parameterized one:

case class Request [P:RequestPayloadType](metadata: String, payload: P) {
  // delegate any code that needs to know the type to `implicitly[RequestPayloadType[T]]...`
}

sealed trait RequestPayloadType[T] {
  // specify here code that needs to know the actual type, i.e: 
  // def encode (value: T): String  // abstract 
  // def decode (value: String): T  // abstract
} 
object RequestPayloadType {
  implicit object StringPayloadType extends RequestPayloadType[String] {
    // implement here any `String` specific code, .i.e:
    // def encode (s: String) = s
    // ...
  }
  implicit object IntPayloadType extends RequestPayloadType[Int] {
    // implement here any `Int` specific code, .i.e:
    // def encode (i: Int) = i.toString
    // ...
  }
}
2

I can see a few major improvements. Let's start from the beginning, first of all we never use val inside a trait for abstract members, look here.

trait Request[Payload] {
  def metadata: String // Not relevant
  def payload: Payload
}

Now let's look here:

object Request {
  def apply[P, R <: Request[P]](code: String)(metadata: String, payload: P): R = code match {
    case "S" => RequestWithString(metadata, payload)
    case "I" => RequestWithInt(metadata, payload)
  }
}

You are misunderstanding the meaning of P <: Request[P], this is an f-bounded type polymorphic param, which is used for what's known as type refinement, e.g return the most specific wrapper type after invoking a method defined on the upper type bound, e.g have methods on Request return RequestWithInt instead of just simply Request. In your case I don't think you are picking the right approach anyhow.

You would use it for a method that takes in both RequestWithString and RequestWithInt instances as params or something like that.

Now in your case what you should do is to use an ADT for your request type. Something like RequestEncoder.

trait RequestEncoder[T] {
  def encode(obj: T): String
  def decode(obj: String): T
}

object RequestEncoder {
  implicit val intEncoder = new RequestEncoder[Int] {
    def encode(obj: Int): String = obj.toString
    def decode(source: String): Int = source.toInt
  }
}

trait Request[Payload : RequestEncoder] {
  def metadata: String // Not relevant
  def payload(source: Payload): String = implicitly[RequestEncoder[Payload]].encode(source)
}
  • I edited the trait to avoid using vals, as this is not relevant to the real problem. Thanks. I don't understand the purpose of the encoder, why would I want to encode/decode the Payload to/from a String? – K. C. Apr 12 '17 at 15:34
  • @K.C. I was simply showing you an approach, read about typeclasses and how to use them. The point is you should define whatever methods you want generically on Request and implement them per type using the typeclass approach. – flavian Apr 12 '17 at 15:43

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