25

I'm trying to figure out how I can automatically annotate the maximum value in a figure window. I know you can do this by manually entering in x,y coordinates to annotate whatever point you want using the .annotate() method, but I want the annotation to be automatic, or to find the maximum point by itself.

Here's my code so far:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
from pandas import Series, DataFrame

df = pd.read_csv('macrodata.csv') #Read csv file into dataframe
years = df['year'] #Get years column
infl = df['infl'] #Get inflation rate column

fig10 = plt.figure()
win = fig10.add_subplot(1,1,1)
fig10 = plt.plot(years, infl, lw = 2)

fig10 = plt.xlabel("Years")
fig10 = plt.ylabel("Inflation")
fig10 = plt.title("Inflation with Annotations")

Here's the figure that it generates

5 Answers 5

50

If x and y are the arrays to plot, you get the coordinates of the maximum via

xmax = x[numpy.argmax(y)]
ymax = y.max()

This can be incorporated into a function that you may simply call with your data.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

x = np.linspace(-2,8, num=301)
y = np.sinc((x-2.21)*3)


fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.plot(x,y)

def annot_max(x,y, ax=None):
    xmax = x[np.argmax(y)]
    ymax = y.max()
    text= "x={:.3f}, y={:.3f}".format(xmax, ymax)
    if not ax:
        ax=plt.gca()
    bbox_props = dict(boxstyle="square,pad=0.3", fc="w", ec="k", lw=0.72)
    arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle="->",connectionstyle="angle,angleA=0,angleB=60")
    kw = dict(xycoords='data',textcoords="axes fraction",
              arrowprops=arrowprops, bbox=bbox_props, ha="right", va="top")
    ax.annotate(text, xy=(xmax, ymax), xytext=(0.94,0.96), **kw)

annot_max(x,y)


ax.set_ylim(-0.3,1.5)
plt.show()

enter image description here

2
  • 2
    Just beautiful :) Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 17:23
  • Because there was some confusion about which method might work with which kind of input: The method presented in this answer works well with the input data being numpy arrays as well as pandas Series. Pure python lists will not work - in this case refer to @Anil_M's answer to this question. Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 17:55
27

I don't have data of macrodata.csv to go with. However, generically, assuming you have x and y axis data as an list, you can use following method to get auto positioning of max.

Working Code:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

x=[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
y=[1,1,1,2,10,2,1,1,1,1]
line, = ax.plot(x, y)

ymax = max(y)
xpos = y.index(ymax)
xmax = x[xpos]

ax.annotate('local max', xy=(xmax, ymax), xytext=(xmax, ymax+5),
            arrowprops=dict(facecolor='black', shrink=0.05),
            )

ax.set_ylim(0,20)
plt.show()

Plot :
enter image description here

9
  • I get this error message when running it: TypeError: 'RangeIndex' object is not callable - I have my axis data inside DataFrame's, not array's. Is this why I get the error message? Because just from looking at your code I know it should work.
    – shadewolf
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 17:23
  • Line 12: ( xpos = y.index(ymax) )
    – shadewolf
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 17:26
  • Tried in both python 2.7 and 3.6 , did not throw any error and was able to plot the graph. Not sure whats going on at your end.
    – Anil_M
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 17:38
  • Here, y is a python list. Lists have an .index method. However, pandas Series do not have this method; it therefore fails. Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 17:38
  • @ ImportanceOfBeingErnest: Yes, Thats why I stated that x and y are assumed to be list.
    – Anil_M
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 17:38
7

The method proposed by @ImportanceOfBeingErnest in his response is really neat, but it doesn't work if the data is within a panda data-frame whose index isn't a zero based uniform index ([0,1,2,..,N]), and it is desired to plot against the index -whose values are the x's-.

I took the liberty to adapt the aforementioned solution and use it with pandas plot function. I also wrote the symmetric min function.

def annot_max(x,y, ax=None):
    maxIxVal = np.argmax(y);
    zeroBasedIx = np.argwhere(y.index==maxIxVal).flatten()[0];
    xmax = x[zeroBasedIx];
    ymax = y.max()
    text= "k={:d}, measure={:.3f}".format(xmax, ymax)
    if not ax:
        ax=plt.gca()
    bbox_props = dict(boxstyle="round,pad=0.3", fc="w", ec="k", lw=0.72)
    arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle="-",connectionstyle="arc3,rad=0.1")
    kw = dict(xycoords='data',textcoords="axes fraction",
              arrowprops=arrowprops, bbox=bbox_props, ha="right", va="top")
    ax.annotate(text, xy=(xmax, ymax), xytext=(0.94,0.90), **kw)

def annot_min(x,y, ax=None):
    minIxVal = np.argmin(y);
    zeroBasedIx = np.argwhere(y.index==minIxVal).flatten()[0];
    xmin = x[zeroBasedIx];
    ymin = y.min()
    text= "k={:d}, measure={:.3f}".format(xmin, ymin)
    if not ax:
        ax=plt.gca()
    bbox_props = dict(boxstyle="round,pad=0.3", fc="w", ec="k", lw=0.72)
    arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle="-",connectionstyle="arc3,rad=0.1")
    kw = dict(xycoords='data',textcoords="axes fraction",
              arrowprops=arrowprops, bbox=bbox_props, ha="right", va="top")
    ax.annotate(text, xy=(xmin, ymin), xytext=(0.94,0.90), **kw)

Usage is straightforward, for example:

ax = df[Series[0]].plot(grid=True, use_index=True, \
                  title=None);
annot_max(df[Series[0]].index,df[Series[0]],ax);
plt.show();

I hope this would be of any help to anyone.

1

For a single Maxima:

Set the peak_distances arg to a large number.

annot_peaks(x,y, ax, peak_distances=10000, y_position_modifier=14)

enter image description here

More than 1 Maxima / Annotate Peaks:

Set the peak_distances arg to a smaller number.

annot_peaks(x,y, ax, peak_distances=30, y_position_modifier=14)

enter image description here

Function for Automatic Annotation of Peaks:

For more than one maxima the we can use very similar code to @ImportanceOfBeingErnest's annot_max(x,y) function; with a couple of important differences and a for-loop for each peak's annotation:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
from scipy.signal import find_peaks
from sklearn.preprocessing import minmax_scale


def annot_peaks(x:np.array,y:np.array, ax=None, peak_distance=30, y_position_modifier=1):
    yindices, _ = find_peaks(y, distance=peak_distance)
    xmax = x[yindices]
    ymax = y[yindices]
    ymodifier = {k:v for k,v in zip(y, y_position_modifier-minmax_scale(y, feature_range=(0,y_position_modifier)))}
    if not ax:
        ax=plt.gca()
    bbox_props = dict(boxstyle="square,pad=0.3", fc="w", ec="k", lw=0.72)
    arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle="->", color="k",
                                connectionstyle="arc3,rad=0")
    kw = dict(xycoords='data',textcoords="data",
              arrowprops=arrowprops, bbox=bbox_props, ha="right", va="top")
    for xmx, ymx in zip(xmax,ymax):
        text= "x={:.1f},\ny={:.1f}".format(xmx, ymx)
        ax.annotate(text, xy=(xmx, ymx), xytext=(xmx*1.1, ymx*(1.5+ymodifier[ymx])), **kw)


x = np.linspace(-2,8, num=301)
y = np.sinc((x-2.21)*3)
fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.plot(x,y)

annot_peaks(x,y, ax, peak_distance=30, y_position_modifier=14)

ax.set_ylim(-0.3,1.5)
plt.show()

Find peaks:

Above uses the scipy.signal.find_peaks() function with a distance arg to determine the horizontal distance between each peak (i.e. smaller value gives more peaks):

from scipy.signal import find_peaks
yindices, _ = find_peaks(y, distance=10)
xmax = x[yindices]
ymax = y[yindices]

Annotation positioning:

Many peaks means careful annotation positioning. To specify an annotation's y-position, a minmax scaled value of y is inverted using a q argument. (This is later used as a text position modifier, i.e. ypos=ymx+(1.1*modifier)). The output is stored in a dictionary-lookup for convenient lookup.

from sklearn.preprocessing import minmax_scale
q = 1
ymodifier = {k:v for k,v in zip(y, q-minmax_scale(y, feature_range=(0,q)))}
ymodifier[ y[0] ]
  • To manage different data magnitudes (e.g. y=range(0,2) or y=range(0,1000)), we can modify an arg q. For the data above q=14, or the nicer nomenclature: y_position_modifier=14.
0

Something like this would work:

infl_max_index = np.where(infl == max(infl)) #get the index of the maximum inflation
infl_max = infl[infl_max_index] # get the inflation corresponding to this index
year_max = year[infl_max_index] # get the year corresponding to this index

plt.annotate('max inflation', xy=(year_max, infl_max))
2
  • FYI, argmax is a built-in method to get the index of the maximum.
    – zephyr
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 16:44
  • @Alex I get this: ValueError: Can only tuple-ndex with MultiIndex
    – shadewolf
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 16:46

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