5

I understand that

def a(&block)
  block.call(self)
end

and

def a()
  yield self
end

lead to the same result, if I assume that there is such a block a {}. My question is - since I stumbled over some code like that, whether it makes any difference or if there is any advantage of having (if I do not use the variable/reference block otherwise):

def a(&block)
  yield self
end

This is a concrete case where i do not understand the use of &block:

def rule(code, name, &block)
  @rules = [] if @rules.nil?
  @rules << Rule.new(code, name)
  yield self
end
  • The documentation for Block Argument shows different use cases. – Stefan Apr 13 '17 at 11:44
  • @Stefan I added a specific case where i do not understand the use of &block, maybe I miss something, so you may have a look? In addition to it I read the documentation and it corresponds to my understanding. – Big X Apr 13 '17 at 11:54
  • If you're not going to explicitly use it, don't add it to the list. It makes invocations slower and it's confusing. – ndnenkov Apr 13 '17 at 11:55
  • 1
    @ndn "it's confusing" - Especially for a beginner. I think this lead to this question. ;) – Big X Apr 13 '17 at 12:00
8

The only advantage I can think of is for introspection:

def foo;       end
def bar(&blk); end

method(:foo).parameters  #=> []
method(:bar).parameters  #=> [[:block, :blk]]

IDEs and documentation generators could take advantage of this. However, it does not affect Ruby's argument passing. When calling a method, you can pass or omit a block, regardless of whether it is declared or invoked.

  • 1
    At least for me, it's not only about introspection. I find it much easier to look at the method signature and see if the last argument has a leading & compared to looking at the whole method and trying to find yield somewhere. – Eric Duminil Apr 13 '17 at 14:38
1

The main difference between

def pass_block
  yield
end
pass_block { 'hi' } #=> 'hi'

and

def pass_proc(&blk)
  blk.call
end
pass_proc  { 'hi' } #=> 'hi'

is that, blk, an instance of Proc, is an object and therefore can be passed to other methods. By contrast, blocks are not objects and therefore cannot be passed around.

def pass_proc(&blk)
  puts "blk.is_a?(Proc)=#{blk.is_a?(Proc)}"
  receive_proc(blk)
end

def receive_proc(proc)
  proc.call
end

pass_proc { 'ho' }
blk.is_a?(Proc)=true
  #=> "ho" 

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