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I am learning variadic templates by doing some exercises and I am stuck when it comes to parameter pack expansion in lambda

So, my idea is to write a timer class whose payload will be callable, But I get a compilation error when I try to expand the parameter pack inside a lambda function..

gcc version 4.8.4 (Ubuntu 4.8.4-2ubuntu1~14.04.3)

   template<typename F, typename... Args>
   struct timer
   {   
      timer(const std::chrono::milliseconds milliseconds, F call, Args&&... args)
      {   
         m_timer = std::make_shared<boost::asio::steady_timer>(
               timer_manager::instance().get_io_service(),
               std::chrono::steady_clock::now() + milliseconds
         );  

         //m_timer->async_wait(call, std::forward<Args>(args)...);
         m_timer->async_wait([=](const boost::system::error_code& ec){
             call(std::forward<Args>(args)...); //Error here
         }); 
      }   

      std::shared_ptr<boost::asio::steady_timer> m_timer;
   };


   // Helper to create the timer
   template<typename F, typename... Args>
   timer<F,Args...> create_timer(const std::chrono::milliseconds milliseconds,F callable, Args&& ...args)
   {   
      return timer<F,Args...>(milliseconds, std::forward<F>(callable), std::forward<Args>(args)...);
   }   

Main program to use it:

auto timer = timer::create_timer(std::chrono::milliseconds(5000), []()                                                                                                                  
{
   std::cout << "timer fired in main" << std::endl;
   payload::execute(10);           
 });

Error:

home/samdaniel/timer/src/timer.hpp: In lambda function:
/home/samdaniel/timer/src/timer.hpp:36:43: error: parameter packs not expanded with ‘...’:
                   call(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
                                           ^
/home/samdaniel/timer/src/timer.hpp:36:43: note:         ‘args’
/home/samdaniel/timer/src/timer.hpp: In instantiation of ‘struct timer::timer<F, Args>::timer(std::chrono::milliseconds, F, Args&& ...) [with F = main()::__lambda1; Args = {}; std::chrono::milliseconds = std::chrono::duration<long int, std::ratio<1l, 1000l> >]::__lambda0’:
/home/samdaniel/timer/src/timer.hpp:35:10:   required from ‘timer::timer<F, Args>::timer(std::chrono::milliseconds, F, Args&& ...) [with F = main()::__lambda1; Args = {}; std::chrono::milliseconds = std::chrono::duration<long int, std::ratio<1l, 1000l> >]’
/home/samdaniel/timer/src/timer.hpp:50:99:   required from ‘timer::timer<F, Args ...> timer::create_timer(std::chrono::milliseconds, F, Args&& ...) [with F = main()::__lambda1; Args = {}; std::chrono::milliseconds = std::chrono::duration<long int, std::ratio<1l, 1000l> >]’
/home/samdaniel/src/main.cpp:21:11:   required from here
/home/samdaniel/timer/src/timer.hpp:36:43: error: using invalid field ‘timer::timer<F, Args>::timer(std::chrono::milliseconds, F, Args&& ...)::__lambda0::__args’
make[2]: *** [src/CMakeFiles/coding_with_me.dir/main.cpp.o] Error 1
make[1]: *** [src/CMakeFiles/coding_with_me.dir/all] Error 2
make: *** [all] Error 2

New example:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

namespace test
{
   template<typename F, typename... Args>
   void callback_dispatcher(F call, Args&& ...args )
   {   
      std::cout << "callback_dispatcher>" << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << "enter <<< " << std::endl;                                                                                                 
      auto invoke_me = [=](){
         call(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
      };  
      invoke_me();
   }   
}

int main()
{
   std::cout << "Main entered..." << std::endl;


   test::callback_dispatcher([](int a)
         {
         std::cout << "void(int) lambda dispatched with a = " << a << std::endl;
         },5);

   std::cout << "Main exited..." << std::endl;
}

Error:

src/generic_callback.cc: In lambda function:
src/generic_callback.cc:11:34: error: parameter packs not expanded with ‘...’:
          call(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
                                  ^
src/generic_callback.cc:11:34: note:         ‘args’
src/generic_callback.cc: In instantiation of ‘struct test::callback_dispatcher(F, Args&& ...) [with F = std::_Bind<std::_Mem_fn<void (plo_callback_tester::*)()>(std::_Placeholder<1>)>; Args = {plo_callback_tester* const}]::__lambda0’:
src/generic_callback.cc:12:7:   required from ‘void test::callback_dispatcher(F, Args&& ...) [with F = std::_Bind<std::_Mem_fn<void (plo_callback_tester::*)()>(std::_Placeholder<1>)>; Args = {plo_callback_tester* const}]’
src/generic_callback.cc:25:101:   required from here
src/generic_callback.cc:11:34: error: using invalid field ‘test::callback_dispatcher(F, Args&& ...)::__lambda0::__args’
src/generic_callback.cc: In instantiation of ‘struct test::callback_dispatcher(F, Args&& ...) [with F = main()::__lambda1; Args = {int}]::__lambda0’:
src/generic_callback.cc:12:7:   required from ‘void test::callback_dispatcher(F, Args&& ...) [with F = main()::__lambda1; Args = {int}]’
src/generic_callback.cc:41:13:   required from here
src/generic_callback.cc:11:34: error: using invalid field ‘test::callback_dispatcher(F, Args&& ...)::__lambda0::__args’
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  • I'm not sure (which is why this is a comment instead of an answer), but I think you want to do std::forward<Args...>(args...); that is, move the ... inside the parentheses and template parameter list. I think the template parameters are also unnecessary here, but again I’m not sure. – Daniel H Apr 13 '17 at 15:23
  • 2
    @DanielH: no, std::forward<Args>(args)... would be correct if Args&&... was a forwarding reference pack. In the constructor std::move(args)... would suffice. – Vittorio Romeo Apr 13 '17 at 15:29
  • 1
    coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/b291d1dff8829497 -- after eliminating stuff that shouldn't change the error, there is no error in either of these compilers. Please provide an actual minimal reproducible example that both reproduces the problem, and eliminates all of those extra unimportant dependencies. Unless you think timer_manager and all the asio stuff actually causes the parameter pack does not expand error, which I don't believe. Admittedly these are later versions of the compiler, but I will leave it to you to generate a minimal reproducible example in your compiler rather than trying to read your mind. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Apr 13 '17 at 15:31
  • @Yakk, add a parameter to the lambda that is being used as a callback and things break - coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/15c0bf4fc22316e6 , but I'm not sure what happens with the types of the parameter pack during the capture in side the lambda and why it breaks:( – Rudolfs Bundulis Apr 13 '17 at 15:35
  • But yeah, removing the std::forward which seems unneeded inside the lambda solves the problems with arguments. Ignore my previous comment. – Rudolfs Bundulis Apr 13 '17 at 15:38
2
#include <iostream>

namespace test
{
  template<typename F, typename... Args>
  void callback_dispatcher(F call, Args&& ...args )
  {   
    std::cout << "callback_dispatcher>" << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << "enter <<< " << std::endl;                                                 
    auto invoke_me = [=]()mutable{
      call(std::move(args)...);
    };  
    invoke_me();
  }   
}

int main()
{
  std::cout << "Main entered..." << std::endl;


  test::callback_dispatcher(
    [](int a)
    {
      std::cout << "void(int) lambda dispatched with a = " << a << std::endl;
    },
    5
  );

  std::cout << "Main exited..." << std::endl;
}

The above slight change compiles in gcc 4.9 and up, but not in gcc 4.8.5.

It also compiles in modern versions of clang.

Update your compiler, or don't use c++11 features that your compiler doesn't support.

You may be able to pack your args into a tuple, then unpack them in the body of the function.

  template<typename F, typename... Args>
  void callback_dispatcher(F call, Args&& ...args )
  {   
    std::cout << "callback_dispatcher>" << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << "enter <<< " << std::endl;                                                 
    auto invoke_me = [tup = std::make_tuple(std::forward<Args>(args)...), call=std::move(call)]()mutable{
      std::apply( call, std::move(tup) );
    };  
    invoke_me();
  }   

where you now have to implement std::apply, which is a C++17 feature, in the limited subset of C++11 you have. (Don't call it std::apply). This approach will probably work in g++ 4.8.

namespace notstd {
  template<std::size_t...Is> struct index_sequence {using type=index_sequence;};
  template<std::size_t N, std::size_t...Is> struct make_index_sequence:make_index_sequence<N-1, N-1, Is...>{};
  template<std::size_t...Is> struct make_index_sequence<0,Is...>:index_sequence<Is...>{};
  namespace details {
    template<class F, class Tuple, std::size_t...Is>
    auto apply( ::notstd::index_sequence<Is...>, F&& f, Tuple&& tuple )
    -> decltype( std::declval<F>()( std::get<Is>(std::declval<Tuple>())... ) )
    {
      return std::forward<F>(f)( std::get<Is>(std::forward<Tuple>(tuple))... );
    }
  }
  template<class F, class Tuple>
  auto apply( F&& f, Tuple&& tuple )
  -> decltype(::notstd::details::apply( make_index_sequence<std::tuple_size<typename std::decay<Tuple>::type>::value>{}, std::forward<F>(f), std::forward<Tuple>(tuple) ))
  {
    return ::notstd::details::apply( make_index_sequence<std::tuple_size<typename std::decay<Tuple>::type>::value>{}, std::forward<F>(f), std::forward<Tuple>(tuple) );
  }
}

live example of C++11 compliant notstd::apply.

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2

If expansion does not work in lambda it is possible to expand the pack outside during creation of functional object and pass it to that lambda.

So instead of:

m_timer->async_wait([=](const boost::system::error_code& ec){
    call(std::forward<Args>(args)...); //Error here
}); 

It could be:

auto functor = std::bind(std::forward<F>(call), std::forward<Args>(args)...);
m_timer->async_wait([=](const boost::system::error_code& ec){
    functor();
}); 
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0

I am also getting same error with c++ (GCC) 4.8.5 20150623 (Red Hat 4.8.5-36) with c++11

template<typename... Args>
    void emplace_front(Args&&... args)
    {
        target( [&] {
                     _collection.emplace_front(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
                     } );
    }

following worked for me!

template<typename... Args>
    void emplace_front(Args&&... args)
    {
        target( [&] (Args ...ar) -> void {
                           _collection.emplace_front(ar...);
                           } );
    }

i get warning for Args&&... args as unused but easy to fix that.

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