0

How to put a Query result in a return variable in SQL Function.I've also included some error messages and it's showing error.I am new to SQL Functions and it would be nice if someone could give explanation regarding this

DELIMITER //
CREATE FUNCTION fHW2_4_nuneedua( a varchar(50))
RETURNS varchar(50)
BEGIN
DECLARE result varchar(50) DEFAULT null;
select if ( a = NULL,
            RAISERROR('please input a valid city name', 16, 1),
            if( (select * from dreamhome.guest where city = a ) = 'NULL',
                  RAISERROR('Empty set', 16, 1),
                 (select GROUP_CONCAT(name) as output from dreamhome.guest where address like "% ' . $a . '%" )
              )
            ) INTO result
RETURN result;
END //
DELIMITE

I am getting error on Line 12 of this function.

2
  • So much is wrong with the definition that it is hard to begin. Why are you using raiseerror in a function, for instance? Perhaps you want a stored procedure. – Gordon Linoff Apr 13 '17 at 20:38
  • Sir, I am new to stored functions in SQL.I want to display errors in output.Can you please give me some references about this without using stored procedure? – Varun Garg Apr 13 '17 at 20:40
0

The simplest syntax changes I could recommend to get you going (as a function) include:

CREATE FUNCTION fHW2_4_nuneedua(@a Varchar(50))
RETURNS Varchar(50)
AS
BEGIN
    IF @a IS NULL RETURN NULL
    IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dreamhome.guest WHERE city = @a) RETURN NULL
    RETURN (SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(name) as output 
    FROM dreamhome.guest WHERE address LIKE "% ' . $" + @a + " . '%")
END

This assumes "dreamhome" is a schema and "guest" is a table...

2
  • Even this is giving error. It says syntax error at line 1. – Varun Garg Apr 13 '17 at 21:09
  • @VarunGarg What's the error say? If it's a "this function already exists" error, then change the word CREATE to ALTER. – Sturgus Apr 18 '17 at 14:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.