I want to download an example image from a HTTP server using methods defined in HTTP protocol (and socket's, of course).

I tried to implement it, but it seems that my code does not download the whole image, no matter if I have the while loop or not.

An example image is here: https://httpbin.org/image/png.

My code downloads only part of the image, and I do not know how to fix it. I do not want use any libraries, such as urllib, I want to use just the sockets.

Any ideas?

import socket

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.connect(('httpbin.org', 80))
s.sendall('GET /image/png HTTP/1.1\r\nHOST: httpbin.org\r\n\r\n')

reply = ""

while True:
    data = s.recv(2048)
    if not data: break
    reply += data

# get image size
size = -1
tmp = reply.split('\r\n')
for line in tmp:
   if "Content-Length:" in line:
      size = int(line.split()[1])
      break

headers =  reply.split('\r\n\r\n')[0]
image = reply.split('\r\n\r\n')[1]

# save image
f = open('image.png', 'wb')
f.write(image)
f.close()
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are doing a HTTP/1.1 request. This HTTP version implicitly behaves like Connection: keep-alive was set. This means that the server might not close the TCP connection immediately after sending the response as you expect in your code but might keep the connection open to wait for more HTTP requests.

When replacing the version with HTTP/1.0 instead the server closes the connection after the request is done and the image is complete because HTTP/1.0 implies Connection: close.

Apart from that: HTTP is way more complex than you might think. Please don't just design your code after some example messages you've seen somewhere but actually read and follow the standards if you really want to implement HTTP yourself.

import socket
import select

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.connect(('httpbin.org', 80))
s.sendall(b'GET /image/png HTTP/1.1\r\nHOST: httpbin.org\r\n\r\n')

reply = b''

while select.select([s], [], [], 3)[0]:
    data = s.recv(2048)
    if not data: break
    reply += data

headers =  reply.split(b'\r\n\r\n')[0]
image = reply[len(headers)+4:]

# save image
f = open('image.png', 'wb')
f.write(image)
f.close()

Note this example is not perfect. The elegant way should be checking Content-Length header and recv exact length of data. (Instead of hard coding 3 seconds as timeout.) And if the server can use chunked encoding, it becomes even more complicated.)

--

The example is in python 3

  • So the Content-Length header is the size of the whole response, or it's the size only of the response body? I managed to cut the Content-Length from the response but had some problems figuring out how to receive an exact size. – mirx Apr 14 '17 at 9:49
  • @mirx only body – cshu Apr 14 '17 at 9:50
  • @mirx to receive exact size, you need to start searching for b'\r\n\r\n' and also call len(data) inside the loop. You can get Content-Length while looping, and stop recv just when you get exact size after the b'\r\n\r\n' (End of headers). – cshu Apr 14 '17 at 9:57
  • @mirx Chunk encoding is possible so Content-Length is not always available. This is an even more complicated case. HTTP is not a simple protocol. (That's why people usually use library, rather than write their own client with tcp socket.) – cshu Apr 14 '17 at 10:01
  • I see. But I just want to play with it a little. Could you please see my new example (I changed it to use Content-Length as you suggested). – mirx Apr 14 '17 at 10:07

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