3

Given the text of the following function:

function f3() {
  return Math.random() > 0.5 ? Promise.resolve(true): 'naaah'
}

Can a regular expression be compiled which to determines the return type of f3() call, without actually calling the function?

10
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    I'll donate a 150pt bounty to a thorough explanation of why it's not possible (or a working RegExp :)). We're settling a friendly disagreement. Also, can someone point me to instructions on attaching a bounty to a question I didn't ask. Can't seem to figure it out.. – Triptych Apr 14 '17 at 18:36
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    Note to above comments: I just edited the question to clarify. In particular you can not actually execute the function to determine the return type. You have only the text of the function. – Triptych Apr 14 '17 at 18:42
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    @guest271314 Agreed. I'd already edited the question to include that. – Triptych Apr 14 '17 at 18:52
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    @guest271314 I'll let the SO community handle that one. – Triptych Apr 14 '17 at 20:51
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    "Can I use a regular expression to cook eggs?" – Lucas Trzesniewski Apr 18 '17 at 12:05
12
+150

Given the code, we cannot determine the return type of this via regular expressions. Proof by Contradiction:

  1. Assume we can find the return type by using a regular expression.

  2. The return type is decided in the final line, via a non-deterministic call to random (it isn't known ahead of time).

  3. Regular expressions are deterministic- they always have the same output when run on the same input.

  4. Thus, the function's return type must be static, since we can run a regular expression and find the return type (and that regular expression will always return the same thing).

  5. Contradiction: The function's return type must be static, but the function's return type is variable due to random

Note: The above assumes the type must be a single one, and does not account for Union types on its own.

Additionally, a proof on why we can't do it always.

  1. Assume that somehow we can figure out every type used in the function in some way.

  2. At some point, we generate a string a="A"+Math.random()

  3. At some later point, we generate a string b="class "+a+"{...}

  4. After this definition, we execute c= eval("new "+a+"()").

  5. When we return c, no regular expression can know the type- the type is newly named in the function, determined randomly and is different for every execution.

This assumes the question was a more general "can javascript regex find the return type of a generic function." Note that if it were possible to find the return type, it would be possible to tell that the program halts (it can't return if it doesn't halt, and the return type would have to be undefined if it never halts), and the Halting problem is still unsolved.

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    What if our type definitions allow for union types? I.e, a valid return type may be (Promise|string)? – Mike Cluck Apr 14 '17 at 18:51
  • @MikeC if that's the case, it becomes much more complicated, though I'd still suspect it can't be done- you'd almost have to check the return statement parsing for a variable or literal, then backreference to that variable's last declaration or mutation, recursively until we find an actual solid declaration (otherwise something like {a="3";a+=1;return a} may fail on noting that there's an addition and assume int, while it returns a string). I suspect we might be able to use something like the Pumping Lemma to disprove it, but I'm not 100% on how to follow through on that right now) – Delioth Apr 14 '17 at 19:04
  • I completely agree with you. Maybe if no one else gets to it by the time I get off work, I'll work out a proof. – Mike Cluck Apr 14 '17 at 19:05
  • @Triptych I believe I've gotten sufficient proof that this is impossible. – Delioth Apr 14 '17 at 19:35
7

No, it is not possible to programmatically determine the return type of that function using only RegEx. In order to understand what that function does, you need to parse its code. However, JavaScript is a Chomsky Type 2 grammar (context free grammar) and RegEx is a Chomsky Type 3 grammar (regular grammar). JavaScript is fundamentally too complex to be parsed with RegEx.

If you're just trying to deal with the fact that you have the function as text and you need to evaluate it, you could use the eval() function.

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    Eh, but I don't think you can consistently apply "regular grammar" to language implementations of regex. There are many features that are stuffed into language regex frameworks (e.g. lookaround) that are not defined in theoretical regex. – Kenneth K. Apr 14 '17 at 18:49
  • I have to agree with @KennethK. As much as I hate that people abuse regex and that most people don't understand it was originally meant for regular languages (which are context-free), the meaning has expanded and regex can have context in most of the modern implementations. – Millie Smith Apr 14 '17 at 19:34
  • This guy argues that PHP's implementation can match all context-free languages and some context-sensitive languages: nikic.github.io/2012/06/15/…. Also, while JS might be recognizable as context-free, I have my doubts that it can be evaluated and / or type-checked without context. – Millie Smith Apr 14 '17 at 19:39
1

The answer is no. Since the return type is determined on the result of Math.random() and result of Math.random() is not known until runtime. This particular function must be executed in order to know the return type.

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    What if our type definitions allow for union types? I.e, a valid return type may be (Promise|string)? – Mike Cluck Apr 14 '17 at 18:51
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    Good comment @Mike. It's obviously impossible to determine whether the result will be a string or a Promise thanks to the call to Math.random. A good static analysis tool ought to be able to determine that it will be one of the two. I think Google's closure compiler can do this already. – Triptych Apr 14 '17 at 19:13
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    @MikeC Still not in javascript. Function can randomly define new types or modify existing ones. – Yury Tarabanko Apr 14 '17 at 19:14
0

EDIT based on clarification from OP:

You can certainly get text of a function using f3.toString(). But building reliable regex to parse return value type will never be reliable. The last line in function may or may not be returning a value. In some cases you explicitly have return statements in middle of function. How would you handle that? You will end up twinkling regex for rest of your development cycle

So if I understand correctly, you want to determine what type of value function returned after calling it. Looks like there are two possibilities: a Boolean true and String 'naaah'

You can determine return type using typeof operator:

function f3() {
  return Math.random() > 0.5 ? Promise.resolve(true): 'naaah'
}
returnVal=f3()
if ((typeof returnVal)=='string')
  console.log("Got String)
if ((typeof returnVal)=='boolean')
  console.log("Got boolean")

If you really really really want to use regex to determine return type:

function f3() {
  return Math.random() > 0.5 ? Promise.resolve(true): 'naaah'
}
returnVal=f3().toString()
var regex = /^naaah$/;
if (regex.test(returnVal))
  console.log("Got String)
else 
  console.log("Got boolean")
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  • You don't understand correctly. They wish to use a regular expression to determine the return type of a function. – Mike Cluck Apr 14 '17 at 18:39
  • While this does what the question's answer should do, and is a significantly better approach, it doesn't answer the question (find with a regex). You also forgot a " after your "Got String. – Delioth Apr 14 '17 at 18:40
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    And that boggles my mind. Why would anyone use regex to determine return type of a function? – alpeshpandya Apr 14 '17 at 18:41
  • Since a regex only works with strings and the return type is not a string the answer is no, you have to do some processing of the return type before applying a regex. – bhspencer Apr 14 '17 at 18:42
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    @alpeshpandya That's the question though. Can you prove, positive or negative, that regular expressions cannot be used to determine the return type of a function? – Mike Cluck Apr 14 '17 at 18:53
0

You can use .toString() to convert function to string, .replace() with RegExp /Math\.random\(\)\s[>]\s0\.5/ to get Math.random() > 0.5 portion of function, which we call at replacement function of .replace() using Function constructor.

As it makes no difference when that portion of f3 is called, we only need the Boolean result of Math.random() > 0.5 to facilitate the conditional operator result.

Again we use RegExp to check what Math.random() > 0.5 returns for only that part of function using /return\strue/, RegExp.prototype.test() and to get the expected type, either Promise or String.

We then use Function constructor again, passing return f3, confident that we have predicted the return type of the function f3 when called.

function f3() {
  return Math.random() > 0.5 ? Promise.resolve(true): 'naaah'
}

f3 = f3.toString().replace(/Math\.random\(\)\s[>]\s0\.5/, function(match) {
  return new Function(`return ${match}`)()
});

// here we can visually determine whether `true` or `false` is returned;
// though as vision is based on perspective, we make sure of the type
// using `RegExp` at defining `type`
console.log(f3);

// here we determine `true` or `false` using `RegExp`
let type = /return\strue/.test(f3) ? "Promise" : "String";

console.log(`f3 return type: ${type}`);

f3 = new Function(`return ${f3}`);

console.log(f3()());

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  • Of course, another variation is to not redefine f3, but rather define a separate function at .toString() and new Function() calls, for example, f4 to preserve f3, then call f4, which would return same result. Redefined f3 at stacksnippets to demonstrate proof that the result could be "predicted", without directly calling the function f3. – guest271314 Apr 14 '17 at 20:18
  • The way to prove this is to rename to f4, then execute both f3 and f4 and compare the result types. If it's the same 20 times in a row, you've done it! Won't happen of course, because the expression Math.random() > 0.5 might change on each invocation. – Triptych Apr 14 '17 at 21:07
  • @Triptych The approach evaluates Math.random() > 0.5 before f3 function call. In effect getting and setting Boolean result before the general f3 function call. We will predict the result type 20 of 20 times. – guest271314 Apr 14 '17 at 21:09
  • Ok, so write the test and prove it. – Triptych Apr 14 '17 at 21:10
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    The replacement function isn't the original function. Like you said, it's a replacement. It may be derived from the original, but it isn't the original, it's the original after it's been partially run. Notably, the original function is nondeterministically typed, and the new one is deterministically typed. Since there's a major difference, the two aren't equivalent, and anything you know about the new one does not necessarily hold for the old one. – Delioth Apr 15 '17 at 0:16

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