2

Suppose I have a data.table

data.table(A=c(1,2,3,4,5,6,4,2))

How can I calculate the sum of a sequences of n elements?

Suppose n=3, The result of the sequence sum of A should be the column seq_sum,

data.table(A=c(1,2,3,4,5,6,4,2),seq_sum=c(1+2+3,2+3+4,3+4+5,4+5+6,5+6+4,6+4+2,4+2,2))

How to effectively do this?

7

Another option is to use Reduce and shift:

dt[, seq_sum := Reduce(`+`, shift(A, 0:2, 0, 'lead'))]

which gives:

> dt
   A seq_sum
1: 1       6
2: 2       9
3: 3      12
4: 4      15
5: 5      15
6: 6      12
7: 4       6
8: 2       2

Full notation with parameter names:

dt[, seq_sum := Reduce(`+`, shift(A, n = 0:2, fill = 0, type = 'lead'))]
  • Thanks! Didn't realize there is a shift function in R. – WCMC Apr 17 '17 at 21:26
  • @WCMC shift is a function from the data.table package; it is comparable with the lag and lead functions – Jaap Apr 18 '17 at 7:50
3

Updated based on comments:

You can also use rollapply from the zoo package:

library(data.table)
library(zoo)
dt <- data.table(A=c(1,2,3,4,5,6,4,2))
dt[, seq_sum := rollapply(A, width = 3, FUN = "sum", align = "left", partial = TRUE)]

# > dt
#    A seq_sum
# 1: 1       6
# 2: 2       9
# 3: 3      12
# 4: 4      15
# 5: 5      15
# 6: 6      12
# 7: 4       6
# 8: 2       2
  • Why is last element 9 instead of 2? – Andrew Lavers Apr 16 '17 at 8:07
  • It seems to me that the last value is wrong. It should be 2 in stead of 9. – KoenV Apr 16 '17 at 8:07
  • dt[, seq_sum := rollapply(A, 3, sum, partial = TRUE, align = "left")] corrects the result – Andrew Lavers Apr 16 '17 at 8:14
3

To avoid repeating summations, a cummulative sum can be stored:

n = 3
A2 = c(A, rep_len(0, n - 1))

cs = cumsum(A2)

And subtract the respective differences:

cs[-seq_len(n - 1)] - c(0, cs[seq_len(length(A2) - n)])
#[1]  6  9 12 15 15 12  6  2

Or, equivalently:

diff(c(0, cs), n)
#[1]  6  9 12 15 15 12  6  2
2
library(data.table)
dt <- data.table(A=c(1,2,3,4,5,6,4,2))
n = 3
sapply(1:(length(dt$A)), function(i) {sum(dt$A[i:(min(i+n-1,length(dt$A)))])})      

    # [1]  6  9 12 15 15 12  6  2
2
library(zoo)

dtab <- data.table(A=c(1,2,3,4,5,6,4,2))
dtab[, seq_sum := rollapplyr(A, 3, sum, partial = TRUE, align = "left")]
1

Here is another method using RcppRoll:suml and some timings for your reference. @Jaap's solution using data.table in-built functions is the fastest.

library(data.table)
library(microbenchmark)

N <- 1e5
set.seed(0L)
dt <- data.table(A=rnorm(N))
n <- 3

dt_cumsum <- copy(dt)
fun_cumsum <- function() {
    dt_cumsum[, seq_sum := {
        cs <- cumsum(c(A, rep_len(0, n - 1)))
        diff(c(0, cs), n)
    }]
}

dt_Reduce <- copy(dt)
fun_Reduce <- function() {
    dt_Reduce[, seq_sum := Reduce(`+`, shift(A, n = seq_len(n) - 1, fill = 0, type = 'lead'))]
}

library(zoo)
dt_zoo <- copy(dt)
fun_zoo <- function() {
    dt_zoo[, seq_sum := rollapply(A, width = n, FUN = "sum", align = "left", partial = TRUE)]
}

fun_base <- function() {
    sapply(1:(length(dt$A)), function(i) {sum(dt$A[i:(min(i+n-1,length(dt$A)))])}) 
}

library(RcppRoll)
dt_RcppRoll <- copy(dt)
fun_RcppRoll <- function() {
    dt_RcppRoll[, seq_sum:=head(roll_suml(c(A, rep_len(0, n - 1)), n), -(n-1))]
}

ans <- capture.output(microbenchmark(
    fun_cumsum(),
    fun_Reduce(),
    fun_zoo(),
    fun_base(),
    fun_RcppRoll(),
    times=5L))
writeLines(paste("#", ans))

# Unit: milliseconds
#            expr       min        lq       mean    median        uq       max neval
#    fun_cumsum()    2.5983    2.6427    2.67526    2.6462    2.7311    2.7580     5
#    fun_Reduce()    1.3903    1.4274    2.84070    1.6620    1.7047    8.0191     5
#       fun_zoo() 1225.1620 1242.9112 1289.76416 1258.1143 1355.1070 1367.5263     5
#      fun_base() 2731.6609 2849.1003 2909.27308 2922.9430 2971.9956 3070.6656     5
#  fun_RcppRoll()    1.7890    1.8430    3.49892    1.9663    2.0774    9.8189     5

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