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I was wondering about why an entity can be re-utilized in an inner scope? Like if i declared the variable x within a scope, then I am able to create another variable with the exact same in an inner scope. Does the computer remove the memory for the outer entity and then replace it with the inner entity then? Or what happens? Why even have this opportunity to do so? What is it good for? It only confuses me

Thanks! I hope that it is explained good enough

Update: By "entity", I guess I mean identifier. An example of what confuses me:

int main()
{
int x = 22;
int y = 33;

{
int x;
x = 44; //now it is another variable 
y = 55; //now y (outer scope) is changed

}
}
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  • What do you mean by an "entity"? Can you add some (pseudo) code to illustrate what you mean? Commented Apr 16, 2017 at 12:42
  • Yes, hold on...
    – user7748100
    Commented Apr 16, 2017 at 12:42
  • They're 2 different variables that happen to have the same name. The inner x shadows the outer one. Commented Apr 16, 2017 at 12:51
  • "Why even have this opportunity to do so?" - Probably historical reasons. AFAIK, this kind of thing first appeared in ALGOL, which invented scoping, was copied from there in C, and is thus still allowed in C++. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable_shadowing Commented Apr 16, 2017 at 12:51

1 Answer 1

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The computer as a whole is not terribly concerned with your variables and your scopes. You probably mean to say "the compiler".

No, the compiler does not "remove the memory for the outer entity and replace it with the inner entity". The compiler allocates an area of memory for your x in the outer scope, and another area of memory for your x in the inner scope, and simply knows that when you are in the outer scope, x refers to the first area of memory, while when you are in the inner scope, x refers to the second area of memory. So, it is all quite efficient.

When this happens, we say that the inner x "shadows" the outer x. (Sometimes you might also hear it being referred to as "masks".)

Of course when your inner scope terminates, x refers to the first area of memory again, so nothing has been removed.

Opinions differ as to whether this is useful and beneficial, or whether it should be avoided. I believe it is useful and beneficial, because what you are doing with shadowing is that you are saying that "the name x now stands for a different entity than the entity that it stands for in the outer scope", and you are thus prevented from accidentally accessing the entity of the outer scope from within the inner scope. The fewer variables your code has to choose from, the better.

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  • @Carcigenicate hmm, you are probably right. I will amend.
    – Mike Nakis
    Commented Apr 16, 2017 at 12:50
  • Yes, I meant the compiler, thanks! Wow, now it makes more sense to me and fantastic to know how it works. Thank you so much!!
    – user7748100
    Commented Apr 16, 2017 at 12:55
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    Like if I call my newborn son "BoundaryImposition", I don't magically disappear. It just means that context determines which one of us you're referring to when you use the name. Commented Apr 16, 2017 at 13:01

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