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I have tried to run multiple HelloWorld files written in Xcode using gcc in terminal. For the sake of conciseness this is one example from TutorialsPoint, in a standalone file called myStandaloneHelloWorld.m:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface SampleClass:NSObject
- (void)sampleMethod;
@end

@implementation SampleClass

- (void)sampleMethod{
    NSLog(@"Hello, World! \n");
}

@end

int main()
{
    /* my first program in Objective-C */
    SampleClass *sampleClass = [[SampleClass alloc]init];
    [sampleClass sampleMethod];
    return 0;
}

Which is compiled in Xcode but when gcc myStandaloneHelloWorld.m is run in terminal, the following list of errors is produced:

Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
  "_NSLog", referenced from:
      -[SampleClass sampleMethod] in myStandaloneHelloWorld-0af75e.o
  "_OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject", referenced from:
      _OBJC_CLASS_$_SampleClass in myStandaloneHelloWorld-0af75e.o
  "_OBJC_METACLASS_$_NSObject", referenced from:
      _OBJC_METACLASS_$_SampleClass in myStandaloneHelloWorld-0af75e.o
  "___CFConstantStringClassReference", referenced from:
      CFString in myStandaloneHelloWorld-0af75e.o
  "__objc_empty_cache", referenced from:
      _OBJC_METACLASS_$_SampleClass in myStandaloneHelloWorld-0af75e.o
      _OBJC_CLASS_$_SampleClass in myStandaloneHelloWorld-0af75e.o
  "_objc_msgSend", referenced from:
      _main in myStandaloneHelloWorld-0af75e.o
ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64
clang: error: linker command failed with exit code 1 (use -v to see invocation)

I know there are other frameworks and syntaxes (for example an Xcode command line tool with very different syntax runs within Xcode), but what is wrong with this syntax run in terminal?

2

Your program has a dependency on the Foundation framework. Just as you have to tell the compiler (or linker) about libraries that your program needs, you have to tell it about frameworks.

Use:

gcc myStandaloneHelloWorld.m -framework Foundation
  • Thanks for this, no more errors. I'm not getting a printed message on my terminal however, is there any further steps? Thanks – jMan Apr 16 '17 at 16:10
  • 2
    The compile command produces an executable named a.out. That weird name is the default if you don't specify a name, for historical reasons. You can run it using ./a.out. (If you want a different name, you can use the -o option to the compiler, like so: gcc -o myStandaloneHelloWorld myStandaloneHelloWorld.m -framework Foundation. You would run the resulting executable using ./myStandaloneHelloWorld.) – Ken Thomases Apr 16 '17 at 16:18
  • Perfect, thanks :) didn't realise .out wasn't a file extension – jMan Apr 16 '17 at 16:23

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