7
for (var keyValue = 0; keyValue < dwhSessionDto.KeyValues.Count; keyValue++)
{...}


var count = dwhSessionDto.KeyValues.Count;
for (var keyValue = 0; keyValue < count; keyValue++)
{...}

I know there's a difference between the two, but is one of them faster than the other? I would think the second is faster.

  • 7
    Looks like a perfect micro-benchmark candidate. – Oded Dec 3 '10 at 10:00
  • 1
    You haven't stated what the types involved are, or what you're doing in the loop. – Jon Skeet Dec 3 '10 at 10:06
  • 1
    @Jon Skeet: Maybe that can be part of the answer. – Lieven Cardoen Dec 3 '10 at 10:12
  • 7
    your wish is my command... but you may not really like the answer. – Jon Skeet Dec 3 '10 at 10:16
  • if you want to know, why not measure in a quick test application? – Richard Dec 3 '10 at 10:38
39

Yes, the first version is much slower. After all, I'm assuming you're dealing with types like this:

public class SlowCountProvider
{
    public int Count
    {
        get
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            return 10;
        }
    }
}

public class KeyValuesWithSlowCountProvider
{
    public SlowCountProvider KeyValues
    {
        get { return new SlowCountProvider(); }
    }
}

Here, your first loop will take ~10 seconds, whereas your second loop will take ~1 second.

Of course, you might argue that the assumption that you're using this code is unjustified - but my point is that the right answer will depend on the types involved, and the question doesn't state what those types are.

Now if you're actually dealing with a type where accessing KeyValues and Count is cheap (which is quite likely) I wouldn't expect there to be much difference. Mind you, I'd almost always prefer to use foreach where possible:

foreach (var pair in dwhSessionDto.KeyValues)
{
    // Use pair here
}

That way you never need the count. But then, you haven't said what you're trying to do inside the loop either. (Hint: to get more useful answers, provide more information.)

  • 6
    ;-) Nice one, Jon, I'll try to be more specific next time. On the other hand, I think you're smart enough to know that I wasn't dealing with types like this. – Lieven Cardoen Dec 3 '10 at 10:21
  • Thx for your update! – Lieven Cardoen Dec 3 '10 at 10:22
  • 1
    @Lieven: Indeed, but I don't know what type you are dealing with, and that can make a huge difference. Even the difference between List<T> and an array can be very important in some cases. – Jon Skeet Dec 3 '10 at 10:22
  • 2
    @Jon: is the loop guaranteed to take 10 seconds? I distinctly remember an MSDN article that mentioned that properties must not rely on being strictly evaluated since the compiler is at liberty of caching the value, if the result can be proven to be the same. Long story short: can’t the JIT evaluate Count once for the whole loop? Even if the property returns a private member rather than a constant, the JITter might in the future refer to that value directly rather than execute the getter. I realize that this is pretty theoretical but OTOH it sounds like a very promising optimization. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 3 '10 at 10:23
  • 1
    @Richard: Absolutely not, because Count has a side-effect (sleeping). Just because the result is a constant expression doesn't mean the JIT is allowed to ignore the side-effects. – Jon Skeet Dec 3 '10 at 10:40
6

it depends how difficult it is to compute dwhSessionDto.KeyValues.Count if its just a pointer to an int then the speed of each version will be the same. However, if the Count value needs to be calculated, then it will be calculated every time, and therefore impede perfomance.

EDIT -- heres some code to demonstrate that the condition is always re-evaluated

public class Temp
{
    public int Count { get; set; }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var t = new Temp() {Count = 5};
    for (int i = 0; i < t.Count; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(i);
        t.Count--;
    }
    Console.ReadLine();
}

The output is 0, 1, 2 - only !

  • I don't think it will be recalculated. Do you have a referece? – Kugel Dec 3 '10 at 10:03
  • I think Im right - see my edit – Dean Chalk Dec 3 '10 at 10:13
  • 2
    @Dean: so what? You’re modifying the underlying int, the loop refers to the underlying int. That’s just a simple cmp/jne in Assembly, regardless of whether Count is a constant or a variable. “recalculate” implies something costly. The only “costly” thing here is loading a value from the cache into a CPU register. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 3 '10 at 10:19
  • @Konrad: The property is not just a variable that you can use. If you look at Jon Skeet's answer where he inserted a sleep you can see that there needs to be some kind of "calculation". – Tomas Jansson Dec 3 '10 at 11:46
  • I think there's been some confusion, my original answer was very much along the lines of John Skeets, saying that because the condition is evaluated every time, if the 'Count' property took time to return an answer, then the looping would take longer. My code that I added later was just in response to @kugel who didnt think the condition was reevaluated – Dean Chalk Dec 3 '10 at 11:51
1

See comments for reasons why this answer is wrong.

If there is a difference, it’s the other way round: Indeed, the first one might be faster. That’s because the compiler recognizes that you are iterating from 0 to the end of the array, and it can therefore elide bounds checks within the loop (i.e. when you access dwhSessionDTo.KeyValues[i]).

However, I believe the compiler only applies this optimization to arrays so there probably will be no difference here.

  • 3
    I don't believe the bounds check can be avoided here because its possible for the body of the loop to modify the KeyValues member – JaredPar Dec 3 '10 at 10:01
  • 1
    @Jared: won’t the compiler detect that? I mean, the same basically holds for every loop over arrays and still the compiler can detect those cases. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 3 '10 at 10:07
  • 2
    I believe the JIT can for a local which is an array. In this case though is a local which has a member that is an array. This member can be modifidd at any moment (threads for example )and hence the JIT can make no assumptions about it – JaredPar Dec 3 '10 at 10:13
  • 1
    @Jared: unfortunately (from the POV of optimizations), that makes sense. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 3 '10 at 10:17
1

It is impossible to say without knowing the implementation of dwhSessionDto.KeyValues.Count and the loop body.

Assume a global variable bool foo = false; and then following implementations:

/* Loop body... */
{
    if(foo) Thread.Sleep(1000);
}

/* ... */
public int Count
{
    get
    {
        foo = !foo;            
        return 10;
    }
}
/* ... */

Now, the first loop will perform approximately twice as fast as the second ;D

However, assuming non-moronic implementation, the second one is indeed more likely to be faster.

0

No. There is no performance difference between these two loops. With JIT and Code Optimization, it does not make any difference.

  • And what if the body of the loop modifies the KeyValues member? – Lieven Cardoen Dec 3 '10 at 10:04
0

There is no difference but why you think that thereis difference , can you please post your findings?

if you see the implementation of insert item in Dictionary using reflector

private void Insert(TKey key, TValue value, bool add)
{
int freeList;
if (key == null)
{
    ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentNullException(ExceptionArgument.key);
}
if (this.buckets == null)
{
    this.Initialize(0);
}
int num = this.comparer.GetHashCode(key) & 0x7fffffff;
int index = num % this.buckets.Length;
for (int i = this.buckets[index]; i >= 0; i = this.entries[i].next)
{
    if ((this.entries[i].hashCode == num) && this.comparer.Equals(this.entries[i].key, key))
    {
        if (add)
        {
            ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentException(ExceptionResource.Argument_AddingDuplicate);
        }
        this.entries[i].value = value;
        this.version++;
        return;
    }
}
if (this.freeCount > 0)
{
    freeList = this.freeList;
    this.freeList = this.entries[freeList].next;
    this.freeCount--;
}
else
{
    if (this.count == this.entries.Length)
    {
        this.Resize();
        index = num % this.buckets.Length;
    }
    freeList = this.count;
    this.count++;
}
this.entries[freeList].hashCode = num;
this.entries[freeList].next = this.buckets[index];
this.entries[freeList].key = key;
this.entries[freeList].value = value;
this.buckets[index] = freeList;
this.version++;

}

Count is a internal member to this class which is incremented each item you insert an item into dictionary

so i beleive that there is no differenct at all.

0

The second version can be faster, sometimes. The point is that the condition is reevaluated after every iteration, so if e.g. the getter of "Count" actually counts the elements in an IEnumerable, or interogates a database /etc, this will slow things down.

So I'd say that if you dont affect the value of "Count" in the "for", the second version is safer.

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