3

After searching around a lot, asking, and doing some code, I kinda got the bare minimum for doing kriging in R's gstat.

Using 4 points (I know, totally bad), I kriged the unsampled points located between them. But in actuality, I don't need all of those points. Inside that area, there is a smaller subarea... this area is the one I actually need.

Long story short.. I have measurements taken from 4 weather stations that report rainfall data. The lat and long coordinates for these points are:

lat    long
7.16   124.21
8.6    123.35
8.43   124.28
8.15   125.08

My road to kriging can be seen through my previous questions on StackOverflow.

This: Create variogram in R's gstat package

And this: Create Grid in R for kriging in gstat

I know that the image in has the coordinates (at least according to my estimates):

Leftmost: 124 13ish 0 E(DMS)

Rightmost : 124 20ish 0 E

Topmost corrdinates: 124 17ish 0 E

Bottommost coordinates: 124 16ish 0 E

Conversion will take place for that but that doesn't matter I think, or easier to deal with later.

The image is also irregular (but aren't they all though).

Think of it like a doughnut, you krige the the whole circular shape of the doughnut but you only need the area covered by the hole so you remove or at least disregard the values you got from the doughnut itself.

I have an image (.jpg) of the area in question, I will have to convert the image into a shapefile or some other vector format using QGIS or similar software. After that, I will have to insert that vector image inside the 4 point kriged area, so I know which coordinates to actually consider and which ones to remove.

Finally, I take the values of the area covered by the image and store them into a csv or database.

Anybody know how I can start with this? Total noob at R and statistics. Thanks to anyone who responds.

I just want to know if its possible and if it is provide some tips. Thanks again.

Might as well also post my script:

suppressPackageStartupMessages({
  library(sp)
  library(gstat)
  library(RPostgreSQL)
  library(dplyr) # for "glimpse"
  library(ggplot2)
  library(scales) # for "comma"
  library(magrittr)
  library(gridExtra)
  library(rgdal)
  library(raster)
  library(leaflet)
  library(mapview)
})


drv <- dbDriver("PostgreSQL")
con <- dbConnect(drv, dbname="Rainfall Data", host="localhost", port=5432, 
             user="postgres", password="postgres")
day_1 <- dbGetQuery(con, "SELECT lat, long, rainfall FROM cotabato.sample")

coordinates(day_1) <- ~ lat + long
plot(day_1)

x.range <- as.integer(c(7.0,9.0))
y.range <- as.integer(c(123.0,126.0))

grid <- expand.grid(x=seq(from=x.range[1], to=x.range[2], by=0.05), 
               y=seq(from=y.range[1], to=y.range[2], by=0.05))

coordinates(grid) <- ~x+y
plot(grid, cex=1.5)
points(day_1, col='red')
title("Interpolation Grid and Sample Points")

day_1.vgm <- variogram(rainfall~1, day_1, width = 0.02, cutoff = 1.8)
day_1.fit <- fit.variogram(day_1.vgm, model=vgm("Sph", psill = 8000, range = 1))
plot(day_1.vgm, day_1.fit)

plot1 <- day_1 %>% as.data.frame %>%
  ggplot(aes(lat, long)) + geom_point(size=1) + coord_equal() + 
  ggtitle("Points with measurements")

plot(plot1)

############################

plot2 <- grid %>% as.data.frame %>%
  ggplot(aes(x, y)) + geom_point(size=1) + coord_equal() + 
  ggtitle("Points at which to estimate")

plot(plot2)
grid.arrange(plot1, plot2, ncol = 2)
coordinates(grid) <- ~ x + y

############################

day_1.kriged <- krige(rainfall~1, day_1, grid, model=day_1.fit)

day_1.kriged %>% as.data.frame %>%
  ggplot(aes(x=x, y=y)) + geom_tile(aes(fill=var1.pred)) + coord_equal() +
  scale_fill_gradient(low = "yellow", high="red") +
  scale_x_continuous(labels=comma) + scale_y_continuous(labels=comma) +
  theme_bw()

write.csv(day_1.kriged, file = "Day_1.csv")

EDIT: The code has changed since the last time. But that doesn't matter I guess, I just want to know if its possible and can anybody provide the simplest example of it being possible. I can derive the solution to the example to my own problem from there.

  • You're right, I'll edit this to fit the required criteria. – ace_01S Apr 17 '17 at 6:19
  • @42 see the edits I made. Is that enough? – ace_01S Apr 17 '17 at 6:35
  • It will be if that SQL dataset is part of one of those packages. It won't be me since I'm nowhere near my machine for a week. I doubt I can do much but if you don't get useful replies in 3 days, ping me. I could put a bounty on it. – 42- Apr 17 '17 at 13:06
  • bounty? is that a StackOverflow mechanic I'm not familiar with? Kinda new to the community see. – ace_01S Apr 17 '17 at 13:26
  • Look at the "featured" items in the separate panel. – 42- Apr 17 '17 at 23:00
2
+200

Let me know if you find this useful:

"Think of it like a doughnut, you krige the the whole circular shape of the doughnut but you only need the area covered by the hole so you remove or at least disregard the values you got from the doughnut itself."

For this you load your vectorial data:

donut <- rgdal::readOGR('/variogram', 'donut')
day_1@proj4string@projargs <- "+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +no_defs +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0" # Becouse donut shape have this CRS

plot(donut, axes = TRUE, col = 3)
plot(day_1, col = 2, pch = 20, add = TRUE)

first plot

Then you delete the 'external ring' and keep the insider. Also indicates that the second isn't a hole anymore:

hole <- donut # for keep original shape
hole@polygons[1][[1]]@Polygons[1] <- NULL
hole@polygons[1][[1]]@Polygons[1][[1]]@hole <- FALSE

plot(hole, axes = TRUE, col = 4, add = TRUE)

In blue the new shapefile

After that you chek whicch points are inside 'hole' new blue vector layer:

over.pts <- over(day_1, hole)
day_1_subset <- day_1[!is.na(over.pts$Id), ]

plot(donut, axes = TRUE, col = 3)
plot(hole, col = 4, add = TRUE)
plot(day_1, col = 2, pch = 20, add = TRUE)
plot(day_1_subset, col = 'white', pch = 1, cex = 2, add = TRUE)

write.csv(day_1_subset@data, 'myfile.csv') # write intersected points table
write.csv(as.data.frame(coordinates(day_1_subset)), 'myfile.csv') # write intersected points coords
writeOGR(day_1_subset, 'path', 'mysubsetlayer', driver = 'ESRI Shapefile') # write intersected points shape

With this code you can solve the 'ring' or doughnut 'hole' if you already have the shapefile. If you have an image and want to clip it try the follow:

In the case you load a raster (get basemap image from web):

coordDf <- as.data.frame(coordinates(day_1)) # get basemap from points
# coordDf <- data.frame(hole@polygons[1][[1]]@Polygons[1][[1]]@coords) # get basemap from hole
colnames(coordDf) <- c('x', 'y') 
imag <- dismo::gmap(coordDf, lonlat = TRUE)
myimag <- raster::crop(day_1.kriged, hole)
plot(myimag)
plot(day_1, add = TRUE, col = 2)

In case you use day_1.kriged:

myCropKrig<- raster::crop(day_1.kriged, hole)

  myCropKrig %>% as.data.frame %>%
  ggplot(aes(x=x, y=y)) + geom_tile(aes(fill=var1.pred)) + coord_equal() +
  scale_fill_gradient(low = "yellow", high="red") +
  scale_x_continuous(labels=comma) + scale_y_continuous(labels=comma) +
  geom_point(data=coordDf[!is.na(over.pts$Id), ], aes(x=x, y=y), color="blue", size=3, shape=20) +
  theme_bw()

plot3

And "Finally, I take the values of the area covered by the image and store them into a csv or database."

write.csv(as.data.frame(myCropKrig), 'myCropKrig.csv')

Hope you find this useful and I respond your meaning

  • This looks really promising. I'll definitely give this a try. EDIT: that's a lot of code to parse through. I'll have to give this a few days to process. Some of those things are pretty new (or unheard of) to me. – ace_01S Apr 25 '17 at 16:03
  • Also, its not actually a doughnut, because having a doughnut grid looks weird. Its a rectangular grid with an irregular shape in the middle. But I see how I can work around it. – ace_01S Apr 25 '17 at 16:08
  • I'm still not abl to check the correctness but it gives th appearance of at the very least being a useful start. Thanks for the effort. – 42- Apr 26 '17 at 13:34
  • Let me know if you need some help ;) – gonzalez.ivan90 Apr 26 '17 at 15:21
  • hole <- donut # for keep original shape hole@polygons[1][[1]]@Polygons[1] <- NULL hole@polygons[1][[1]]@Polygons[1][[1]]@hole <- FALSE. @gonzales.ivan90 What does this mean? Also sorry for not getting back to you as of late. I just finished georeferencing the image I just pulled. – ace_01S Apr 29 '17 at 5:24
2

To simplify your question:

  • You want to delineate an area based on an image that is not georeferenced.
  • You want to extract results of a interpolation only for this area

Few steps are required

  1. You need to use QGIS to georeference your image (Raster > Georeferencer). You need to have a georeferenced map in background to help. This creates a raster object with spatial information.
  2. Two possibilities.
    • 2.a. The central part of your image has a color than can be directly used as a mask in R (Ex. All green pixels in middle of red pixels).
    • 2.b. If not, you need to use QGIS to delineate manually a Polygon of the area (Layer > Create Layer > New Shapefile > Polygon)
  3. Import your raster or polygon shapefile in R
  4. Use function raster::mask to extract values of your interpolation using the raster image or the SpatialPolygon.
  • I'm upvoting but not yet awarding the bounty because I don't see a fully coded solution. And since I'm on vacation, I'm unable to determine if this set of instructions is sufficient for someone with my limited experience in GIS coding. – 42- Apr 21 '17 at 21:14
  • I understand. Indeed, the question requires more QGIS than R. Thus, not a lot of coding. The problem of the question is that it requires a complete protocol, that I would usually propose as a complete 1-day tutorial. I don't think that stackoverflow aims at giving complete courses like that. With the given steps, Ace_01S will know where to look at: the QGIS manual... – Sébastien Rochette Apr 22 '17 at 8:57
  • Then I'll wait for further input from @Ace_01S. I have no experience with that application. – 42- Apr 22 '17 at 14:19
  • Wow, never expected anybody to answer. I'll try to look into QGIS more thoroughly. As for the R side of things, I kinda had some idea in the time between the posting of the question and now. – ace_01S Apr 24 '17 at 4:46

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