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I am reading through the documentation of PyTorch and found an example where they write

gradients = torch.FloatTensor([0.1, 1.0, 0.0001])
y.backward(gradients)
print(x.grad)

where x was an initial variable, from which y was constructed (a 3-vector). The question is, what are the 0.1, 1.0 and 0.0001 arguments of the gradients tensor ? The documentation is not very clear on that.

4

The original code I haven't found on PyTorch website anymore.

gradients = torch.FloatTensor([0.1, 1.0, 0.0001])
y.backward(gradients)
print(x.grad)

The problem with the code above there is no function based on what to calculate the gradients. This means we don't know how many parameters (arguments the function takes) and the dimension of parameters.

To fully understand this I created several examples close to the original:

Example 1:

a = torch.tensor([1.0, 2.0, 3.0], requires_grad = True)
b = torch.tensor([3.0, 4.0, 5.0], requires_grad = True)
c = torch.tensor([6.0, 7.0, 8.0], requires_grad = True)

y=3*a + 2*b*b + torch.log(c)    
gradients = torch.FloatTensor([0.1, 1.0, 0.0001])
y.backward(gradients,retain_graph=True)    

print(a.grad) # tensor([3.0000e-01, 3.0000e+00, 3.0000e-04])
print(b.grad) # tensor([1.2000e+00, 1.6000e+01, 2.0000e-03])
print(c.grad) # tensor([1.6667e-02, 1.4286e-01, 1.2500e-05])

As you can see I assumed in the first example our function is y=3*a + 2*b*b + torch.log(c) and the parameters are tensors with three elements inside.

But there is another option:

Example 2:

import torch

a = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)
b = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)
c = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)

y=3*a + 2*b*b + torch.log(c)    
gradients = torch.FloatTensor([0.1, 1.0, 0.0001])
y.backward(gradients)

print(a.grad) # tensor(3.3003)
print(b.grad) # tensor(4.4004)
print(c.grad) # tensor(1.1001)

The gradients = torch.FloatTensor([0.1, 1.0, 0.0001]) is the accumulator.

The next example would provide identical results.

Example 3:

a = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)
b = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)
c = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)

y=3*a + 2*b*b + torch.log(c)

gradients = torch.FloatTensor([0.1])
y.backward(gradients,retain_graph=True)
gradients = torch.FloatTensor([1.0])
y.backward(gradients,retain_graph=True)
gradients = torch.FloatTensor([0.0001])
y.backward(gradients)

print(a.grad) # tensor(3.3003)
print(b.grad) # tensor(4.4004)
print(c.grad) # tensor(1.1001)

As you may hear PyTorch autograd system calculation is equivalent to Jacobian product.

Jacobian

In case you have a function, like we did:

y=3*a + 2*b*b + torch.log(c)

Jacobian would be [3, 4*b, 1/c]. However, this Jacobian is not how PyTorch is doing things to calculate the gradients at certain point.

For the previous function PyTorch would do for instance δy/δb, for b=1 and b=1+ε where ε is small. So there is nothing like symbolic math involved.

If you don't use gradients in y.backward():

Example 4

a = torch.tensor(0.1, requires_grad = True)
b = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)
c = torch.tensor(0.1, requires_grad = True)
y=3*a + 2*b*b + torch.log(c)

y.backward()

print(a.grad) # tensor(3.)
print(b.grad) # tensor(4.)
print(c.grad) # tensor(10.)

You will simple get the result at a point, based on how you set your a, b, c tensors initially.

Be careful how you initialize your a, b, c:

Example 5:

a = torch.empty(1, requires_grad = True, pin_memory=True)
b = torch.empty(1, requires_grad = True, pin_memory=True)
c = torch.empty(1, requires_grad = True, pin_memory=True)

y=3*a + 2*b*b + torch.log(c)

gradients = torch.FloatTensor([0.1, 1.0, 0.0001])
y.backward(gradients)

print(a.grad) # tensor([3.3003])
print(b.grad) # tensor([0.])
print(c.grad) # tensor([inf])

If you use torch.empty() and don't use pin_memory=True you may have different results every time.

Also, note gradients are like accumulators so zero them when needed.

Example 6:

a = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)
b = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)
c = torch.tensor(1.0, requires_grad = True)
y=3*a + 2*b*b + torch.log(c)

y.backward(retain_graph=True)
y.backward()

print(a.grad) # tensor(6.)
print(b.grad) # tensor(8.)
print(c.grad) # tensor(2.)

Lastly I just wanted to state some terms PyTorch uses:

PyTorch creates a dynamic computational graph when calculating the gradients. This looks much like a tree.

So you will often hear the leaves of this tree are input tensors and the root is output tensor.

Gradients are calculated by tracing the graph from the root to the leaf and multiplying every gradient in the way using the chain rule.

86

Explanation

For neural networks, we usually use loss to assess how well the network has learned to classify the input image (or other tasks). The loss term is usually a scalar value. In order to update the parameters of the network, we need to calculate the gradient of loss w.r.t to the parameters, which is actually leaf node in the computation graph (by the way, these parameters are mostly the weight and bias of various layers such Convolution, Linear and so on).

According to chain rule, in order to calculate gradient of loss w.r.t to a leaf node, we can compute derivative of loss w.r.t some intermediate variable, and gradient of intermediate variable w.r.t to the leaf variable, do a dot product and sum all these up.

The gradient arguments of a Variable's backward() method is used to calculate a weighted sum of each element of a Variable w.r.t the leaf Variable. These weight is just the derivate of final loss w.r.t each element of the intermediate variable.

A concrete example

Let's take a concrete and simple example to understand this.

from torch.autograd import Variable
import torch
x = Variable(torch.FloatTensor([[1, 2, 3, 4]]), requires_grad=True)
z = 2*x
loss = z.sum(dim=1)

# do backward for first element of z
z.backward(torch.FloatTensor([[1, 0, 0, 0]]), retain_graph=True)
print(x.grad.data)
x.grad.data.zero_() #remove gradient in x.grad, or it will be accumulated

# do backward for second element of z
z.backward(torch.FloatTensor([[0, 1, 0, 0]]), retain_graph=True)
print(x.grad.data)
x.grad.data.zero_()

# do backward for all elements of z, with weight equal to the derivative of
# loss w.r.t z_1, z_2, z_3 and z_4
z.backward(torch.FloatTensor([[1, 1, 1, 1]]), retain_graph=True)
print(x.grad.data)
x.grad.data.zero_()

# or we can directly backprop using loss
loss.backward() # equivalent to loss.backward(torch.FloatTensor([1.0]))
print(x.grad.data)    

In the above example, the outcome of first print is

2 0 0 0
[torch.FloatTensor of size 1x4]

which is exactly the derivative of z_1 w.r.t to x.

The outcome of second print is :

0 2 0 0
[torch.FloatTensor of size 1x4]

which is the derivative of z_2 w.r.t to x.

Now if use a weight of [1, 1, 1, 1] to calculate the derivative of z w.r.t to x, the outcome is 1*dz_1/dx + 1*dz_2/dx + 1*dz_3/dx + 1*dz_4/dx. So no surprisingly, the output of 3rd print is:

2 2 2 2
[torch.FloatTensor of size 1x4]

It should be noted that weight vector [1, 1, 1, 1] is exactly derivative of loss w.r.t to z_1, z_2, z_3 and z_4. The derivative of loss w.r.t to x is calculated as:

d(loss)/dx = d(loss)/dz_1 * dz_1/dx + d(loss)/dz_2 * dz_2/dx + d(loss)/dz_3 * dz_3/dx + d(loss)/dz_4 * dz_4/dx

So the output of 4th print is the same as the 3rd print:

2 2 2 2
[torch.FloatTensor of size 1x4]

  • 1
    just a doubt, why are we calculating x.grad.data for gradients for loss or z. – Priyank Pathak Jun 8 '18 at 16:58
  • 3
    Maybe I missed something, but I feel like the official documentation really could have explained the gradient argument better. Thanks for your answer. – protagonist Aug 24 '18 at 3:57
  • 1
    @jdhao "It should be noted that weight vector [1, 1, 1, 1] is exactly derivative of loss w.r.t to z_1, z_2, z_3 and z_4." I think this statement is really key to the answer. When looking at the OP's code a big question mark is where do these arbitrary (magic) numbers for the gradient come from. In your concrete example I think it would be very helpful to point out the relation between the e.g. [1, 0, 0 0] tensor and the loss function right away so one can see that the values aren't arbitrary in this example. – a_guest Sep 3 '18 at 9:13
  • 1
    @smwikipedia, that is not true. If we expand loss = z.sum(dim=1), it will become loss = z_1 + z_2 + z_3 + z_4. If you know simple calculus, you will know that the derivative of loss w.r.t to z_1, z_2, z_3, z_4 is [1, 1, 1, 1]. – jdhao Feb 19 at 9:17
  • 1
    I love you. Solved my doubt! – Red Floyd Jul 21 at 5:18
39

Typically, your computational graph has one scalar output says loss. Then you can compute the gradient of loss w.r.t. the weights (w) by loss.backward(). Where the default argument of backward() is 1.0.

If your output has multiple values (e.g. loss=[loss1, loss2, loss3]), you can compute the gradients of loss w.r.t. the weights by loss.backward(torch.FloatTensor([1.0, 1.0, 1.0])).

Furthermore, if you want to add weights or importances to different losses, you can use loss.backward(torch.FloatTensor([-0.1, 1.0, 0.0001])).

This means to calculate -0.1*d(loss1)/dw, d(loss2)/dw, 0.0001*d(loss3)/dw simultaneously.

  • 2
    Thank you so much for your answer. It was really helpful. Thanks! – Infintyyy Sep 16 '18 at 21:22
  • 1
    "if you want to add weights or importances to different losses, you can use loss.backward(torch.FloatTensor([-0.1, 1.0, 0.0001]))." -> This is true but somewhat misleading because the main reason why we pass grad_tensors is not to weigh them differently but they are gradients w.r.t. each element of corresponding tensors. – Aerin Jan 12 at 23:26
  • Thanks a lot man. – Ankit Bindal Oct 25 at 18:24
26

Here, the output of forward(), i.e. y is a a 3-vector.

The three values are the gradients at the output of the network. They are usually set to 1.0 if y is the final output, but can have other values as well, especially if y is part of a bigger network.

For eg. if x is the input, y = [y1, y2, y3] is an intermediate output which is used to compute the final output z,

Then,

dz/dx = dz/dy1 * dy1/dx + dz/dy2 * dy2/dx + dz/dy3 * dy3/dx

So here, the three values to backward are

[dz/dy1, dz/dy2, dz/dy3]

and then backward() computes dz/dx

  • 5
    Thanks for the answer but how is this useful in practice? I mean where do we need [dz/dy1, dz/dy2, dz/dy3] other than hardcoding backprop? – hi15 May 21 '17 at 21:07
  • Is it correct to say that the provided gradient argument is the gradient computed in the latter part of the network? – Khanetor Feb 2 '18 at 21:31

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