2

I'm using SparkPost on my application to send emails to me and clients. In order to do this, I need to serialize an array using C#. I have the following code that does not seem to be working and I have no idea why.

recipients = new List<Recipient>() {
    toAddresses.Select(addr => new Recipient() {
        address = addr.ToString()
    })
}

toAddresses is just a List<string> with email addresses.

Recipient class:

class Recipient {
    public string address;
}

The output of that LINQ select should look like this:

recipients = new List<Recipient>(){
    new Recipient() {
        address ="joe_scotto@1.net"
    },
    new Recipient() {
        address ="joe_scotto@2.net"
    },
    new Recipient() {
        address ="joe_scotto@1.net"
    },
    new Recipient() {
        address ="jscotto@2.com"
    }
}

Any help would be great, thanks!

Specific Errors:

Error CS1503 Argument 1: cannot convert from 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable' to 'app.Recipient'

Error CS1950 The best overloaded Add method 'List.Add(Recipient)' for the collection initializer has some invalid arguments

Request String:

wc.UploadString("https://api.sparkpost.com/api/v1/transmissions", JsonConvert.SerializeObject(
new {
    options = new {
        ip_pool = "sa_shared"
    },
    content = new {
        from = new {
            name = "a Sports",
            email = "no-reply@colorizer.a.com"
        },
        subject = subject,
        html = emailBody
    },
    recipients = new List<Recipient>() {
        toAddresses.Select(addr => new Recipient() {
            address => addr
        })
    }
}

));

  • Can you please describe in what way your current code "does not seem to be working?" Are you getting an error message? Different output than you'd expected? – StriplingWarrior Apr 17 '17 at 14:54
  • @StriplingWarrior See updated question. – Joe Scotto Apr 17 '17 at 14:58
5

Seems like you need simple mapping

var recipients = toAddresses.Select(addr => new Recipient { address = addr }).ToList();

You cannot use IEnumerable as parameter for list initialization

var recipients = new List<Recipient>() { toAddresses.Select...  }

Initialization logic will call List.Add on every item you pass in { }, so it expects instances of Recepient separated by comma, but when you pass there IEnumerable it fail.

List<T> have overload constructor which accept IEnumerable<T> as argument so you can use this

var recepients = new List<Recepient>(toAddresses.Select(addr => new Recipient {address = addr}));

But on my own opinion simple mapping seems more readable.

var message = new 
{
    options = new 
    { 
        ip_pool = "sa_shared"
    },
    content = new 
    {
        from = new 
        {
            name = "a Sports",
            email = "no-reply@colorizer.a.com"
        },
        subject = subject,
        html = emailBody
    },
    recipients = toAddresses.Select(addr => new Recipient() { address = addr}).ToList()
}
  • 4
    Why would this work when his existing code doesn't work? – StriplingWarrior Apr 17 '17 at 14:52
  • @StriplingWarrior: because when the List<Recipient> constructor is invoked, the compiler expects the LINQ query to result in a single recipient. It gives an error: Argument #1' cannot convert System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<Recipient>' expression to type Recipient'`. – Willem Van Onsem Apr 17 '17 at 14:53
  • 2
    @WillemVanOnsem I think the point was that the reason should be part of the answer. – juharr Apr 17 '17 at 14:54
  • 2
    Good edit. You may also want to mention that he could have passed the Select result into the constructor of the new List<Recipient(). – StriplingWarrior Apr 17 '17 at 14:56
  • 2
    @AndriiLitvinov: I only said that because I think that's what the OP probably thought he was doing. The fact that he was newing up a List and trying to pass values through the initializer makes me think he'd seen a similar approach before (using the constructor argument) and was just getting confused between the two syntaxes. Fabio did a great job with this answer. – StriplingWarrior Apr 17 '17 at 16:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.