48

I'm using VS2017 Community and it just received an update yesterday. Today I wanted to implement an interface and now the implementation looks like this:

public string City 
{ 
    get => throw new NotImplementedException(); 
    set => throw new NotImplementedException(); 
}

Instead of this (what I expected):

public string City { get; set; }

Why this change? Not sure if this is specific to C#7 or VS or whatever. I just know that the auto implementation of interfaces has changed over the last week or so.

My interface:

public interface IMyInterface
{
    string City { get; set; }
}
8
  • 9
    That is specific to VS2017, not C# v7. Just the way they chose to do it, fairly sensible choice given that they can never guess at what you intend to do. Apr 18, 2017 at 11:18
  • 3
  • 3
    Is this a typo that at first it is public int City and later on it is public string City? I.e. you changed from integer to string.
    – Uwe Keim
    Apr 18, 2017 at 11:23
  • 3
    I've always seen the "implement interface" command write code to throw exceptions (2013, 2015 at least). The only newness to 2017 is the more concise coding via the => syntax.
    – Zenilogix
    Apr 18, 2017 at 15:28
  • 1
    I might be reiterating what has already been said but apart from the syntactic sugar, i.e. =>, I fail to see what has changed. (I haven't used 2017 yet but in all previous version I've used, when auto implementing an interface all methods and properties throw NotImplementedExceptions) Apr 18, 2017 at 16:13

4 Answers 4

55

So, I know this is an old question, but it looks like Visual Studio 2017 now allows you to choose between the two styles (throw vs plain old get;set;). (I'm using 15.7.5 of 2017 Community).

To do this, go to Tools=>Options=>Text Editor=>C#=>Advanced, and scroll to the bottom, where you should have an Implement Interface or Abstract Class section.

Inside of that, you can set the When generating properties radio button to either the default "prefer throwing properties", or to the old style by selecting "prefer auto properties".

Here's where to look for it in the Options setting: enter image description here

2
  • I have been days fighting this. Thank you! Aug 11, 2020 at 21:20
  • Is there a way to choose which is generated on the fly when implementing an interface?
    – tdbeckett
    Nov 2, 2021 at 18:22
13

I personally hope this is a bug. At this point we can only guess why the team changed the behavior.

However, generally speaking, there is a good reason to implement 'failing' code by default: you, as a developer, has to deliberately make a decision on how to implement that piece of code. What if the default implementation of a method would just return default(T)? The code will 'work' until someone notices the 'not implemented' code.

I would argue though that for properties you generally can say nowadays that auto-implemented properties are the way to go. In 99% of the occurrences, the default implementation is the correct one, in contrary to the above reasoning for methods.

4
  • 1
    Yeah I can see that there might be some good reasons to it. Force the developer to check every property. But with so many classes and interfaces I bet 99% of the developers will just get new "find & replace all" habits and then nothing will really.
    – Christian
    Apr 18, 2017 at 11:20
  • 2
    If you auto implement an interface all added methods will throw the NotImplementedException by default. Seems the team decided to do the same on properties as well.
    – Sir Rufo
    Apr 18, 2017 at 11:23
  • 1
    @SirRufo: The getter and setter of a property are methods.
    – Ben Voigt
    Apr 18, 2017 at 17:55
  • @BenVoigt Of course they are and I never said they are not
    – Sir Rufo
    Apr 18, 2017 at 23:35
6

Looks like they just shortened the default implementation of interface properties. In versions prior to 2017, interface properties were implemented like this by default:

    public string City
    {
        get
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        set
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

Which I've always thought was a waste of screen real estate. Personally I'm not that fond of either method, but it makes sense to stub out interface implementations with NotImplementedExceptions to force you to actually do something with them.

3
  • I have never seen interface properties implemented with the throw new NotImplementedException(); Normally it would just be { get; set; }
    – Christian
    Apr 20, 2017 at 10:00
  • If you create a class that implements an interface, then do a CTRL-. on the red squiggly, that's when you get the default "NotImplemented" properties that I am talking about. Not to be confused with an auto-property that you can get by typing prop{tab}{tab}. May 10, 2017 at 20:10
  • I too, in the past, had only seen empty get/set implementations when using auto-implemented interfaces. In the majority of cases 'forcing' me to do something with them primarily involves a find-replace. Certainly no heavy lifting involved, but still an unwanted and gross necessity. Sep 26, 2017 at 21:20
1

The auto generated code is the part of the Test Driven Development (TDD) approach. The methodology dictates - fail the unit test first and then code to fix the issue. It goes on in cycles of test a bit and code a bit. With these cycles a task gets completed.

It also applies to those applications that follow agile methodology with frequent feature addition and deployments. Few things could be under development and other associated stable components go to production. The in-progress methods or properties are marked with not implemented tag.

[TestClass] 
public class UnitComp1 
{ 
    [TestMethod] 
    public void SalaryCalculationTest() 
    { 
        Payroll pr = new Payroll(); 
        Assert.IsTrue(da.IsValidGrossAmount(2000), "Invalid gross amount"); 
    } 
} 

//Cycle 1 - Test fails
public class Payroll
{
   public bool IsValidGrossAmount(int amount)
   {
     throw new NotImplementedException();
   }
}

//Cycle 2 - Test passes (done)
public class Payroll
{
   public bool IsValidGrossAmount(int amount)
   {
     return amount > 1000;
   }
}

Check out more, here

1
  • Very like you are correct - however it's still extremely annoying and, in my opinion, an undesirable change. It would be nice if there were at least a template file (and I've looked but not found one yet so I welcome a correct here) that could be changed to return to simple { get; set; } auto property default implementations. Sep 26, 2017 at 21:18

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