1

I am trying to stream audio files from S3 to my React client by making a request to my Node/Express server. I managed to implement something that works, but I am not sure if I am actually streaming the file here, or simply downloading it. I suspect I might be downloading the file, because my requests to the server take a long time to come back:

Established database connection.
Server listening on port 9000!
::1 - - [18/Apr/2017:21:13:43 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 424 6.933 ms
::1 - - [18/Apr/2017:21:13:43 +0000] "GET /static/js/main.700ba5c4.js HTTP/1.1" 200 217574 1.730 ms
::1 - - [18/Apr/2017:21:13:43 +0000] "GET /index.css HTTP/1.1" 200 - 8.722 ms
Server received a request: GET /tracks
::1 - - [18/Apr/2017:21:13:43 +0000] "GET /tracks HTTP/1.1" 304 - 41.468 ms
Server received a request: GET /tracks/1/stream
::1 - - [18/Apr/2017:21:14:13 +0000] "GET /tracks/1/stream HTTP/1.1" 200 - 636.249 ms
Server received a request: GET /tracks/2/stream
Database query threw an error: ETIMEDOUT

Note the 636.249 ms!

Can you guys tell if I am doing anything wrong here? I pasted the code from my current approach below; It does the following:

  1. Client makes a fetch call to /tracks/id/stream
  2. Server queries database to get the track
  3. Server uses downloadStream (from the s3 package) to get the file
  4. Server pipes the data to the client
  5. Client receives the data as an ArrayBuffer
  6. Client decodes the buffer and passes it to an AudioBufferSourceNode
  7. AudioBufferSourceNode plays the audio

The server-side:

app.get('/tracks/:id/stream', (req, res) => {

  const id = req.params.id

  // Query the database for all tracks
  database.query(`SELECT * FROM Tracks WHERE id = ${id}`, (error, results, fields) => {

    // Upon failure...
    if (error) {
      res.sendStatus(500)
    }

    // Upon success...
    const params = {
      Bucket: bucketName, // use bucketName defined elsewhere
      Key: results[0].key // use the key from the track object
    };

    // Download stream and pipe to client
    const stream = client.downloadStream(params)
    stream.pipe(res)
  })
});

The client-side fetch call:

const URL = `/tracks/${id}/stream`
const options = { method: 'GET' }

fetch(URL, options)
.then(response => response.arrayBuffer())
.then(data => {

  // do some stuff

  AudioPlayer.play(data)
})

The client-side AudioPlayer, responsible for handling the actual AudioBufferSourceNode:

const AudioPlayer = {
  play: function(data) {

    // Decode the audio data
    context.decodeAudioData(data, buffer => {

      // Create a new buffer source
      source = context.createBufferSource()
      source.buffer = buffer
      source.connect(context.destination)

      // Start playing immediately
      source.start(context.currentTime)
    })    
  },
...
  • What is client and downloadStream() – peteb Apr 18 '17 at 23:16
  • I mentioned that downloadStream comes from the s3 package; Client also comes from there. – Sherwood Callaway Apr 18 '17 at 23:18
3

There's a lot wrong here, so let's just go through it piece by piece, whether it was related to your original question or not.

  database.query(`SELECT * FROM Tracks WHERE id = ${id}`, (error, results, fields) => {

In this line, you open yourself up to SQL injection attacks. Never concatenate arbitrary data into the context of a query (or any other context for that matter) without proper escaping. Whatever database library you're using will have a parameterized method that you should be utilizing.

I suspect I might be downloading the file, because my requests to the server take a long time to come back

Who knows... you didn't show us a single location where you're doing the logging so it's hard to say whether or not the logged line is before or after the request is complete. One thing that is clear however is that the response has to at least begin, otherwise the response status code wouldn't be known. A 600 ms response time for the first resource byte from S3 isn't unheard of anyway.

  1. Server uses downloadStream (from the s3 package) to get the file
  2. Server pipes the data to the client

You're wasting a lot of bandwidth with this. Rather than fetching the file and relaying it to the client, what you should do is sign a temporary URL with a 15-minute expiration or so, and redirect the client to it. The client will follow the redirect and now S3 is responsible for handling your clients. It will cost you half as much bandwidth, less CPU resource, and will be delivered from a location likely closer to your users. You can create this signed URL with the AWS JS SDK.

  1. Client receives the data as an ArrayBuffer

There's no streaming happening here. Your client is downloading the entire resource before it's playing anything.

What you should do is be creating a normal Audio instance. It will automagically follow your redirect from your Node.js app to your signed S3 URL and handle all the buffering and streaming for you.

let a = new Audio('/tracks/' + encodeURIComponent(id) + '/stream');
a.play();
  • what package did you use to use the Audio instance. I'm currently using Node v8.10.0. I'm trying to use your answer to create a live internet radio. – Renato Francia Mar 22 '18 at 20:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.