7

I have over a thousand audio files and I want to check if their sample rate is 16kHz. To do it manually, it would take me forever. Is there a way to check the sample rate using python.

  • what format are the audio files? – ehudk Apr 19 '17 at 9:09
  • WAV file. mono channel – ash Apr 19 '17 at 9:15
10

Python has a builtin module dealing with WAV files.

You can write a simple script that will iterate over all files in some directory. something along the general lines of:

import os
import wave
for file_name in os.listdir(FOLDER_PATH):
    with wave.open(file_name, "rb") as wave_file:
        frame_rate = wave_file.getframerate()
        .... DO WHATEVER ....
| improve this answer | |
  • I'm glad to hear that! Though your comment about Python 3.x strike me a bit weird since Python 2.7 has a WAV library as well. Anyway, good luck with the rest of your work :-) – ehudk Apr 19 '17 at 13:11
  • Below Python version 3.4, wave.open() doesn't return a context manager. For older Python versions, the call can be wrapped in contextlib.closing(). – Matthias Apr 20 '17 at 14:02
1

For .wav files the solution might be:

from scipy.io.wavfile import read as read_wav
import os
os.chdir('path') # change to the file directory
sampling_rate, data=read_wav("filename.wav") # enter your filename
print sampling_rate
| improve this answer | |
1

I end up getting unknow file format error with the wave package from python. wave-error

Alternatively the sox wrapper in python works for me. pysox

!pip install sox
import sox
sox.file_info.sample_rate("file1.wav")

Hope it helps

| improve this answer | |
  • This I have done this on windows. Installing sox in Linux could be a nightmare, because of dependency package and compatibility with Linux version. – DSBLR Oct 31 '19 at 1:51
  • works perfectly well on linux. Just install sox lib first: '$ sudo apt install sox' – markling May 19 at 18:16

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