160

Is there are more readable way to check if a key buried in a dict exists without checking each level independently?

Lets say I need to get this value in a object buried (example taken from Wikidata):

x = s['mainsnak']['datavalue']['value']['numeric-id']

To make sure that this does not end with a runtime error it is necessary to either check every level like so:

if 'mainsnak' in s and 'datavalue' in s['mainsnak'] and 'value' in s['mainsnak']['datavalue'] and 'nurmeric-id' in s['mainsnak']['datavalue']['value']:
    x = s['mainsnak']['datavalue']['value']['numeric-id']

The other way I can think of to solve this is wrap this into a try catch construct which I feel is also rather awkward for such a simple task.

I am looking for something like:

x = exists(s['mainsnak']['datavalue']['value']['numeric-id'])

which returns True if all levels exists.

21 Answers 21

238

To be brief, with Python you must trust it is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission

try:
    x = s['mainsnak']['datavalue']['value']['numeric-id']
except KeyError:
    pass

The answer

Here is how I deal with nested dict keys:

def keys_exists(element, *keys):
    '''
    Check if *keys (nested) exists in `element` (dict).
    '''
    if not isinstance(element, dict):
        raise AttributeError('keys_exists() expects dict as first argument.')
    if len(keys) == 0:
        raise AttributeError('keys_exists() expects at least two arguments, one given.')

    _element = element
    for key in keys:
        try:
            _element = _element[key]
        except KeyError:
            return False
    return True

Example:

data = {
    "spam": {
        "egg": {
            "bacon": "Well..",
            "sausages": "Spam egg sausages and spam",
            "spam": "does not have much spam in it"
        }
    }
}

print 'spam (exists): {}'.format(keys_exists(data, "spam"))
print 'spam > bacon (do not exists): {}'.format(keys_exists(data, "spam", "bacon"))
print 'spam > egg (exists): {}'.format(keys_exists(data, "spam", "egg"))
print 'spam > egg > bacon (exists): {}'.format(keys_exists(data, "spam", "egg", "bacon"))

Output:

spam (exists): True
spam > bacon (do not exists): False
spam > egg (exists): True
spam > egg > bacon (exists): True

It loop in given element testing each key in given order.

I prefere this to all variable.get('key', {}) methods I found because it follows EAFP.

Function except to be called like: keys_exists(dict_element_to_test, 'key_level_0', 'key_level_1', 'key_level_n', ..). At least two arguments are required, the element and one key, but you can add how many keys you want.

If you need to use kind of map, you can do something like:

expected_keys = ['spam', 'egg', 'bacon']
keys_exists(data, *expected_keys)
13
  • Yes, as mentioned this is a valid solution. But imagine a function which is accessing like 10 times such a variable, all the try except statements will leave quite a bloat.
    – loomi
    Commented Apr 19, 2017 at 9:15
  • @loomi You can make a small function this try-except logic and simply call this each time Commented Apr 19, 2017 at 9:17
  • @loomi wrap it in a function. Commented Apr 19, 2017 at 9:18
  • 1
    "In two words, with Python you must trust it is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission" uses a lot more than two words. Commented Jul 13, 2017 at 23:40
  • 3
    Great answer, but one thing should be changed: if type(element) is not dict to if not isinstance(element, dict). This way it will work for types like OrderedDict as well.
    – Fonic
    Commented Jul 29, 2019 at 8:42
31

You could use .get with defaults:

s.get('mainsnak', {}).get('datavalue', {}).get('value', {}).get('numeric-id')

but this is almost certainly less clear than using try/except.

2
  • 1
    And whatever you give the last get as the default value, it could just happen to be the value of s['mainsnak']['datavalue']['value']['numeric-id'].
    – timgeb
    Commented Apr 19, 2017 at 9:16
  • 13
    I've been using this construct a lot and just got shot in foot by this. Be cautions when using example above, because if the "getted" element actually exists and is not dict (or object on which you can call get) (None is my case), this will end up with 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'get' or whatever type you have there.
    – darkless
    Commented Sep 11, 2019 at 9:00
18

Python 3.8 +

dictionary = {
    "main_key": {
        "sub_key": "value",
    },
}

if sub_key_value := dictionary.get("main_key", {}).get("sub_key"):
    print(f"The key 'sub_key' exists in dictionary[main_key] and it's value is {sub_key_value}")
else:
    print("Key 'sub_key' doesn't exists or their value is Falsy")

Extra

A little but important clarification.

In the previous code block, we verify that a key exists in a dictionary but that its value is also Truthy. Most of the time, this is what people are really looking for, and I think this is what the OP really wants. However, it is not really the most "correct" answer, since if the key exists but its value is False, the above code block will tell us that the key does not exist, which is not true.

So, I leet here a more correct answer:

dictionary = {
    "main_key": {
        "sub_key": False,
    },
}

if "sub_key" in dictionary.get("main_key", {}):
    print(f"The key 'sub_key' exists in dictionary[main_key] and it's value is {dictionary['main_key']['sub_key']}")
else:
    print("Key 'sub_key' doesn't exists")
6
  • SyntaxError: invalid syntax at if key_exists := dictionary.get("key_1", {}).get("key_2"):
    – aysh
    Commented Aug 20, 2020 at 1:43
  • @aysh It's Python 3.8 example Commented Sep 3, 2020 at 15:59
  • 1
    What if dictionary['main_key']['sub_key'] == False? You need to explicitly check against the sentinel returned by get when the key does not exist, not just assume that None is the only falsey value.
    – chepner
    Commented Jul 28, 2021 at 0:12
  • @chepner Yeah, that's a really good point. I modified my answer. Commented Jul 28, 2021 at 14:05
  • Is it possible to add types for the key value? for example: if sub_key_value := dictionary.get("main_key", {}).get("sub_key") -> List[str]: Commented Sep 16, 2022 at 7:09
14

Try/except seems to be most pythonic way to do that.
The following recursive function should work (returns None if one of the keys was not found in the dict):

def exists(obj, chain):
    _key = chain.pop(0)
    if _key in obj:
        return exists(obj[_key], chain) if chain else obj[_key]

myDict ={
    'mainsnak': {
        'datavalue': {
            'value': {
                'numeric-id': 1
            }
        }
    }
}

result = exists(myDict, ['mainsnak', 'datavalue', 'value', 'numeric-id'])
print(result)
>>> 1
3
  • 1
    How would you do it for arrays, like if 'value' was an array of 'numeric-ids' result = exists(myDict, ['mainsnak', 'datavalue', 'value[0]', 'numeric-id']) ?
    – Dss
    Commented Aug 13, 2019 at 20:13
  • @Maurice Meyer : What if 'mainsnak2' , 'mainsnak3' and so on exists (like 'mainsnak', inner dictionary remains same). In that case, can we check if 'datavalue exists' in all 'mainsnak','mainsnak2' & 'mainsnak3' ?
    – StackGuru
    Commented Jul 10, 2020 at 15:48
  • 1
    doesn't work if numeric-id is None, we won't be sure if the value is None or key is missing. stackoverflow.com/a/43491315/86258 is better
    – srs
    Commented May 14, 2021 at 21:01
11

I suggest you to use python-benedict, a solid python dict subclass with full keypath support and many utility methods.

You just need to cast your existing dict:

s = benedict(s)

Now your dict has full keypath support and you can check if the key exists in the pythonic way, using the in operator:

if 'mainsnak.datavalue.value.numeric-id' in s:
    # do stuff

Here the library repository and the documentation: https://github.com/fabiocaccamo/python-benedict

Note: I am the author of this project

4
  • It's a great library but causes often name conflicts with BeneDict. I have to search for an alternative as it simply was unusable in my environment.
    – Andreas
    Commented Oct 25, 2021 at 21:35
  • This module is registered on pypi as python-benedict. Probably your IDE assumes that the name of the package to install matches the name of the module you are importing, but this is wrong. I suggest you to take full-control of what you do and install requirements manually :) Commented Oct 26, 2021 at 8:11
  • @FabioCaccamo Thanks for this. If possible, can you please name some advantages/disadvantages of your repository over pydash recommended by @Alexander here? (mostly in terms of performance/memory) Commented Feb 26, 2022 at 10:27
  • @MichelGokanKhan frankly I don't know/use pydash, so I can't say, but if you try both let me know! Commented Feb 28, 2022 at 8:37
6

You can use pydash to check if exists: http://pydash.readthedocs.io/en/latest/api.html#pydash.objects.has

Or get the value (you can even set default - to return if doesn't exist): http://pydash.readthedocs.io/en/latest/api.html#pydash.objects.has

Here is an example:

>>> get({'a': {'b': {'c': [1, 2, 3, 4]}}}, 'a.b.c[1]')
2
0
4

The try/except way is the most clean, no contest. However, it also counts as an exception in my IDE, which halts execution while debugging.

Furthermore, I do not like using exceptions as in-method control statements, which is essentially what is happening with the try/catch.

Here is a short solution which does not use recursion, and supports a default value:

def chained_dict_lookup(lookup_dict, keys, default=None):
    _current_level = lookup_dict
    for key in keys:
        if key in _current_level:
            _current_level = _current_level[key]
        else:
            return default
    return _current_level
1
  • I like this solution :) ... Just a note here. at some point current_level[key] can point to a value and not an inner dict. So anyone using this, take care to check that current_level is not string, or a float or something. Commented Sep 25, 2020 at 21:11
4

The accepted answer is a good one, but here is another approach. It's a little less typing and a little easier on the eyes (in my opinion) if you end up having to do this a lot. It also doesn't require any additional package dependencies like some of the other answers. Have not compared performance.

import functools

def haskey(d, path):
    try:
        functools.reduce(lambda x, y: x[y], path.split("."), d)
        return True
    except KeyError:
        return False

# Throwing in this approach for nested get for the heck of it...
def getkey(d, path, *default):
    try:
        return functools.reduce(lambda x, y: x[y], path.split("."), d)
    except KeyError:
        if default:
            return default[0]
        raise

Usage:

data = {
    "spam": {
        "egg": {
            "bacon": "Well..",
            "sausages": "Spam egg sausages and spam",
            "spam": "does not have much spam in it",
        }
    }
}

(Pdb) haskey(data, "spam")
True
(Pdb) haskey(data, "spamw")
False
(Pdb) haskey(data, "spam.egg")
True
(Pdb) haskey(data, "spam.egg3")
False
(Pdb) haskey(data, "spam.egg.bacon")
True

Original inspiration from the answers to this question.

EDIT: a comment pointed out that this only works with string keys. A more generic approach would be to accept an iterable path param:

def haskey(d, path):
    try:
        functools.reduce(lambda x, y: x[y], path, d)
        return True
    except KeyError:
        return False

(Pdb) haskey(data, ["spam", "egg"])
True
2
  • This requires the keys to be strings, though, right?
    – Manu
    Commented Apr 27, 2022 at 12:28
  • Hey @Manu, you are correct. It's a very easy change to support non-strings. I'll make an edit.
    – totalhack
    Commented Apr 28, 2022 at 14:30
3

The selected answer works well on the happy path, but there are a couple obvious issues to me. If you were to search for ["spam", "egg", "bacon", "pizza"], it would throw a type error due to trying to index "well..." using the string "pizza". Like wise, if you replaced pizza with 2, it would use that to get the index 2 from "Well..."

Selected Answer Output Issues:

data = {
    "spam": {
        "egg": {
            "bacon": "Well..",
            "sausages": "Spam egg sausages and spam",
            "spam": "does not have much spam in it"
        }
    }
}

print(keys_exists(data, "spam", "egg", "bacon", "pizza"))
>> TypeError: string indices must be integers

print(keys_exists(data, "spam", "egg", "bacon", 2)))
>> l

I also feel that using try except can be a crutch that we might too quickly rely on. Since I believe we already need to check for the type, might as well remove the try except.

Solution:

def dict_value_or_default(element, keys=[], default=Undefined):
    '''
    Check if keys (nested) exists in `element` (dict).
    Returns value if last key exists, else returns default value
    '''
    if not isinstance(element, dict):
        return default

    _element = element
    for key in keys:
        # Necessary to ensure _element is not a different indexable type (list, string, etc).  
        # get() would have the same issue if that method name was implemented by a different object
        if not isinstance(_element, dict) or key not in _element:
            return default

        _element = _element[key]
        
    return _element 

Output:

print(dict_value_or_default(data, ["spam", "egg", "bacon", "pizza"]))
>> INVALID

print(dict_value_or_default(data, ["spam", "egg", "bacon", 2]))
>> INVALID

print(dict_value_or_default(data, ["spam", "egg", "bacon"]))
>> "Well..."
3

A bit ugly, but the simplest way to achieve this in a one-liner

d = {
     'mainsnak': {
             'datavalue': {
                     'value': {
                             'numeric-id': {
                              }
                      }
              }
     }
}

d.get('mainsnak',{}).get('datavalue',{}).get('value',{}).get('numeric-id')

1
  • actually the most beautiful I've seen so far :-)
    – Iľja
    Commented Feb 7 at 15:30
2

I had the same problem and recent python lib popped up:
https://pypi.org/project/dictor/
https://github.com/perfecto25/dictor

So in your case:

from dictor import dictor

x = dictor(s, 'mainsnak.datavalue.value.numeric-id')

Personal note:
I don't like 'dictor' name, since it doesn't hint what it actually does. So I'm using it like:

from dictor import dictor as extract
x = extract(s, 'mainsnak.datavalue.value.numeric-id')

Couldn't come up with better naming than extract. Feel free to comment, if you come up with more viable naming. safe_get, robust_get didn't felt right for my case.

2

Another way:

def does_nested_key_exists(dictionary, nested_key):
    exists = nested_key in dictionary
    if not exists:
        for key, value in dictionary.items():
            if isinstance(value, dict):
                exists = exists or does_nested_key_exists(value, nested_key)
    return exists
2
  • what is does_nested_key_exists(value, nested_key) here
    – aysh
    Commented Aug 20, 2020 at 3:08
  • @aysh, in case you're still curious, this is a recursuve call to does_nested_key_exists. Because if not exists evaluated to True for the parent dictionary, we want to check all child dictionaries (ie all values in dictionary that are instances of dict), so we start this function again. Passing value as the first argument means this time the function will get the value sub-dictionary in its dictionary parameter. This continues down through all nested dictionaries so if nesed_key exists in any of them, the original call to does_nested_key_exists will eventually return True.
    – Cat
    Commented Apr 12, 2021 at 9:09
2

Here's my small snippet based on @Aroust's answer:

def exist(obj, *keys: str) -> bool:
    _obj = obj
    try:
        for key in keys:
            _obj = _obj[key]
    except (KeyError, TypeError):
        return False
    return True

if __name__ == '__main__':
    obj = {"mainsnak": {"datavalue": {"value": "A"}}}
    answer = exist(obj, "mainsnak", "datavalue", "value", "B")
    print(answer)

I added TypeError because when _obj is str, int, None, or etc, it would raise that error.

1

I wrote a data parsing library called dataknead for cases like this, basically because i got frustrated by the JSON the Wikidata API returns as well.

With that library you could do something like this

from dataknead import Knead

numid = Knead(s).query("mainsnak/datavalue/value/numeric-id").data()

if numid:
    # Do something with `numeric-id`
1

Using dict with defaults is concise and appears to execute faster than using consecutive if statements.

Try it yourself:

import timeit

timeit.timeit("'x' in {'a': {'x': {'y'}}}.get('a', {})")
# 0.2874350370002503

timeit.timeit("'a' in {'a': {'x': {'y'}}} and 'x' in {'a': {'x': {'y'}}}['a']")
# 0.3466246419993695

1

I have written a handy library for this purpose.

I am iterating over ast of the dict and trying to check if a particular key is present or not.

Do check this out. https://github.com/Agent-Hellboy/trace-dkey

0

If you can suffer testing a string representation of the object path then this approach might work for you:

def exists(str):
    try:
        eval(str)
        return True
    except:
        return False

exists("lst['sublist']['item']")
2
  • but in the scope of this function "lst" isn't defined
    – Dss
    Commented Aug 13, 2019 at 20:15
  • you should pass the dict as well, and use eval against the local variable
    – Shar
    Commented Mar 15, 2021 at 19:26
0

one can try to use this for checking whether key/nestedkey/value is in nested dict

import yaml

#d - nested dictionary
if something in yaml.dump(d, default_flow_style=False):
    print(something, "is in", d)
else:
    print(something, "is not in", d)
0

Also using eval, but passes the top level object as the first argument. It works with dot access and key access. Just take the line you're trying to access and insert the quote marks at the end of top level object.

def exists(d, access_string):
    try:
        result = eval("d" + access_string, {'d': d})
        return result is not None
    except Exception:
        return False

x = exists(s, "['mainsnak']['datavalue']['value']['numeric-id']")

This has the virtue of working with very little changes to the original code.

0

The accepted answer by Arount can be simplified and made more readable if we use modern type hint annotations and allocate the type enforcement to either mypy or pydantic instead:

from collections.abc import Hashable, Mapping
from typing import Any


def has_keys(dct: Mapping[Hashable, Any], *keys: Hashable) -> bool:
    """
    Check if all specified keys exist in a mapping at the respective nesting level.

    Args:
        dct (Mapping[Hashable, Any]): The mapping to check for keys.
        *keys (Hashable): Variable number of keys to check for in the mapping.

    Returns:
        bool: True if all keys are found, False otherwise.

    Example:
        >>> nested_dict = {"a": {"b": {"c": 42}}}
        >>> has_keys(nested_dict, "a", "b", "c")
        True

        >>> has_keys(nested_dict, "a", "b", "d")
        False
    """
    if not keys:
        raise TypeError("Required at least one key.")

    try:
        for key in keys:
            dct = dct[key]
    except (KeyError, TypeError):
        return False
    return True
-1

There are many great answers. here is my humble take on it. Added check for array of dictionaries as well. Please note that I am not checking for arguments validity. I used part Arnot's code above. I added this answer because a I got a use case that requires checking array or dictionaries in my data. Here is the code:

def keys_exists(element, *keys):
    '''
    Check if *keys (nested) exists in `element` (dict).
    '''
    
    retval=False
    if isinstance(element,dict):
        for key,value in element.items():
            for akey in keys:
                if element.get(akey) is not None:
                    return True
            if isinstance(value,dict) or isinstance(value,list):
                retval= keys_exists(value, *keys)
            
    elif isinstance(element, list):
        for val in element:
            if isinstance(val,dict) or isinstance(val,list):
                retval=keys_exists(val, *keys)

    return retval

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