I have form fields where the user enters in:

  • percents: 50.5%
  • money: $144.99
  • dates: Wednesday, Jan 12th, 2010

...

The percent and money type attributes are saved as decimal fields with ActiveRecord, and the dates are datetime or date fields.

It's easy to convert between formats in javascript, and you could theoretically convert them to the activerecord acceptable format onsubmit, but that's not a decent solution.

I would like to do something override the accessors in ActiveRecord so when they are set it converts them from any string to the appropriate format, but that's not the best either.

What I don't want is to have to run them through a separate processor object, which would require something like this in a controller:

def create
  # params == {:product => {:price => "$144.99", :date => "Wednesday, Jan 12, 2011", :percent => "12.9%"}}
  formatted_params = Product.format_params(params[:product])
  # format_params == {:product => {:price => 144.99, :date => Wed, 12 Jan 2011, :percent => 12.90}}
  @product = Product.new(format_params)
  @product.save
  # ...
end

I would like for it to be completely transparent. Where is the hook in ActiveRecord so I can do this the Rails Way?

Update

I am just doing this for now: https://gist.github.com/727494

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  format :price, :except => /\$/
end

product = Product.new(:price => "$199.99")
product.price #=> #<BigDecimal:10b001ef8,'0.19999E3',18(18)>
  • 1
    There is gem named 'attribute_normalizer' which does this work – Jahan Zinedine Nov 29 '12 at 22:38
up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can use a before validation hook to normalize out your params such as before_validation

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base

     before_validation :format_params


      .....


     def format_params
        self.price = price.gsub(/[^0-9\.]/, "")
        ....
     end
  • 2
    If you edit this value again in your app you'll need to make this process bi-directional e.g whatever process you perform in the before_validation you need to reverse by overriding the getter, see iain's answer to this question for an example – David Burrows May 19 '11 at 15:36
  • 1
    Assuming price is a number in the database, as written above it will happen after type casting. Meaning user input of "1ab23cd45" would get to_f treatment to 1 before ever seeing format_params. After a long day I now know that should be self.price = price_before_type_cast.gsub([/[^0-9\.]/,'') The use of the automatically generated *_before_type_cast accessor is a crucial secret. – elc Jan 10 '13 at 2:40
  • 1
    further addendum: You actually need price_before_type_cast.to_s.gsub(...) because otherwise you'll hit 'unknown method gsub for Fixnum' type errors eg when a factory assigns a number to price. – elc Jan 10 '13 at 17:55

You could override the setter or getter.

Overriding the setter:

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  def price=(price)
    self[:price] = price.to_s.gsub(/[^0-9\.]/, '')
  end
end

Overriding the getter:

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  def price
    self[:price].to_s.gsub(/[^0-9\.]/, ''))
  end
end

The difference is that the latter method still stores anything the user entered, but retrieves it formatted, while the first one, stores the formatted version.

These methods will be used when you call Product.new(...) or update_attributes, etc...

  • This should be the accepted answer. – Erowlin Jan 17 at 10:39

Use monetize gem for parsing numbers.

Example

Monetize.parse(val).amount

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