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I'm injecting my DLL into a process, then hooking a function like this: (recv)

BOOL HookFunction(LPCWSTR moduleName, LPCSTR funcName, LPVOID funcProxy, 
unsigned char* lpBackup)
{
     BYTE jmp[6] = { 0xe9,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0xc3 };
     DWORD funcAddr = (DWORD)GetProcAddress(GetModuleHandle(moduleName), funcName);

     DWORD prev;
     VirtualProtect((LPVOID)funcAddr, 6, PAGE_EXECUTE_READWRITE, &prev);

     ReadProcessMemory(GetCurrentProcess(), (LPVOID)funcAddr, lpBackup, 6, NULL);

     DWORD proxy = ((DWORD)funcProxy - funcAddr) - 5;
     memcpy(&jmp[1], &proxy, 4);
     memcpy((LPVOID)funcAddr, jmp, 6);

     VirtualProtect((LPVOID)funcAddr, 6, prev, &prev);
     FlushInstructionCache(GetCurrentProcess(), NULL, NULL);

     return funcAddr;
}

// Hook
HookFunction(L"ws2_32.dll", "recv", (LPVOID*)nRecv, hookR);

I'm attaching a debugger then and here's the result:

Before hooking: enter image description here

After hooking: enter image description here

There are a couple of things I don't understand though, since I'm still trying to understand and visualize how does the stack, heap etc. work all together in a debugger.

BYTE jmp[6] = { 0xe9,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0xc3 };

Am I replacing instructions here, for example, the "move, edi, edi" (recv) of original function with 0xe9? And then the next instruction with 0x00... or how exactly does that work?

Any detailed explanation would be appreciated.

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  • Looks more C like than C++, at least in style. – PeterSW Apr 19 '17 at 10:17
  • The code is using Windows API functions, and these have nothing to do with standard C or C++. To get a more useful answer, remove the C++ tag, and add a relevant tag such as windows. – Peter Apr 19 '17 at 10:19
  • Thank you, have done that :) – J. Doe Apr 19 '17 at 10:20
  • @Anders that's a very invalid statement. I'm learning and I need help, is that such a bad thing to ask here, or ya'll geniuses? – J. Doe Apr 19 '17 at 12:18
  • You are using ReadProcessMemory but a normal memcpy write, this smells like copy and paste. You should learn about address spaces and assembly language before attempting to hook something this way. IAT hooking is a much safer option. – Anders Apr 19 '17 at 14:39
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BOOL HookFunction(LPCWSTR moduleName, LPCSTR funcName, LPVOID funcProxy, 
unsigned char* lpBackup)
{
     BYTE jmp[6] = 
     { 
        0xe9,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, /*JMP and 4 bytes of offset*/
        0xc3                      /*RET*/
     };

     /*
       JMP (e9) is relative, its 32-bit signed immediate operand encodes the 
       number of bytes to jump forward relative to the NEXT instruction.
     */

     /* Get the target address of the function to hook */
     DWORD funcAddr = (DWORD)GetProcAddress(GetModuleHandle(moduleName), funcName);

     /* Code is not necessarily mapped as writable, we remap it */
     DWORD prev;
     VirtualProtect((LPVOID)funcAddr, 6, PAGE_EXECUTE_READWRITE, &prev);

     /* Read the original 6 bytes we are going to overwrite */
     ReadProcessMemory(GetCurrentProcess(), (LPVOID)funcAddr, lpBackup, 6, NULL);

     /* 
        Compute the offset: target - source 
        target = funcProxy
        source = funcAddr + 5 (length of JMP)

        target - source = funcProxy - funcAddr - 5
     */
     DWORD proxy = ((DWORD)funcProxy - funcAddr) - 5;

     /*
        Create the JMP instruction: set the offset
     */
     memcpy(&jmp[1], &proxy, 4);

     /* Overwrite the first 6 bytes of the target function */
     memcpy((LPVOID)funcAddr, jmp, 6);

     /* Reset the memory protection to its original value*/
     VirtualProtect((LPVOID)funcAddr, 6, prev, &prev);

     /* Since we write to a code section with DS, flush the L1 I cache */
     FlushInstructionCache(GetCurrentProcess(), NULL, NULL);

     return funcAddr;
}

The HookFunction create a little piece of x86 code in memory (a trampoline) of the form

jmp <0>     ;e9 00 00 00 00
ret         ;c3

where <0> is successively overwritten with the encoded target (see comments in the code) of the jump - the hook function.
The trampoline, once crafted, becomes

jmp funcProxy     ;e9 .. .. .. ..
ret               ;c3

This code is then written directly at the beginning of the hooked function, thereby overwriting its original code.

The code is polyglot - it works both for x86 and x86-64.


The original code of the hooked function is copied into lpBackup.
This is necessary to call the original function again, the hook function cannot call it without first restoring it.

Since this is expensive and not re-entrant, a cleaner approach is to modify the Import Address Table - the effectiveness of this solution depends on your requirements however.

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  • Thank you so much for the explanation, appreciate! :) – J. Doe Apr 19 '17 at 12:21

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