14

I have a dictionary:

private Dictionary<Type, IExample> examples;

I have two classes that implement the interface:

public class Example1 : IExample
{
}

public class Example2 : IExample
{
}

I have created a way to get an instance from the dictionary if it exists but am trying to figure out a way to instantiate a new object if it doesn't exist.

public T GetExample<T>() where T : IExample
{
    // Return the signal if it exists
    if (examples.ContainsKey(typeof(T)))
    {
        IExample value;

        if (!examples.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out value))
        {
            // unable to get value
        }

        return (T)value;
    }

    // Stuck on this line here. How exactly do I instantiate a new example if it doesn't exist.
    examples.Add(typeof(T), new );

    return default(T);
}

Is such a thing possible?

1
  • 4
    Side note: I don't like "getter" methods that mutate the state. A GetSomething() method should only get the 'something', not add something to the dictionary. A better Name for your function would perhaps be GetOrCreateExample<T>()
    – Treb
    Apr 20, 2017 at 12:49

5 Answers 5

13

You would need to add a generic type parameter constraint on your generic method for parameter-less constructor and then you can instantiate the type T parameter like new T():

public T GetExample<T>() where T : IExample,class,new()
{
       IExample value;

       if (examples.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out value))
       {
           return (T)value;
       }


   T obj =  new T(); // create instance of T and use further down in code it's reference
   examples.Add(typeof(T),obj );

   return obj ;
}

and return default(T); would return null not a new instance of T as for class (Reference Types) default value is null, i doubt you want to do return new T(); there, which will create a new object and will return the reference to it back to caller.

2
  • The compiler is complaining about the double where statement. "A constraint clause has already been specified"
    – user923
    Apr 20, 2017 at 8:23
  • 2
    @EhsanSajjad I would remove ContainsKey as TryGetValue itself is sufficient not to raise exceptions. Apr 20, 2017 at 8:44
8

Although you can certainly make a type constraint requiring a default constructor, it is often too constraining: users of your code may be reluctant to make a default constructor public, or have no default constructor at all.

A more flexible approach takes a delegate that creates a missing object:

public T GetExample<T>(Func<T> make) where T : IExample, class {
    IExample value;
    if (examples.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out value)) {
        return (T)value;
    }
    T res =  make();
    examples.Add(typeof(T), res);
    return res;
}

This way the caller is in control of how to create new objects when the object that you need is not cached in the examples. Your code calls back "on demand", so the object creation logic remains firmly hidden in the caller's code, for example

var e = exampleFactory.GetExample<MyExample>(
    () => new MyExample(firstParameter, secondParameter)
);
0
1

You can use reflection to instantiate a generic type:

var newInstance =  return Activator.CreateInstance<T>();

As Ehsan noted, you need to add a constraint to the type T so it can be instantiated: where T: class.

Or you add the new() constraint where T: new(). Then you can instantiate it as

var newInstance = new T();
1
  • 1
    Thank you. Trying to avoid reflection but I appreciate having the option.
    – user923
    Apr 20, 2017 at 8:26
1

Expanding on Ehsan's answer, here's how I would do it:

public T GetExample<T>() where T : IExample,class,new()
{

    IExample value;

    if (!examples.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out value))
    {
        // Object doesn't exist. Create and add
        value = new T();
        examples.Add(typeof(T), value);
    }

    return (T)value;
}

Using both ContainsKey and TryGetValue is redundant.

1

You can use the new constraint @EhsanSajjad suggested and create a generic extension method for the dictionary:

public static class DictionaryExtensions
{
    public static TValue GetOrCreate<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, TKey key) where TValue : new()
    {
        var exists = dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out var value);

        if (!exists)
        {
            value = new TValue();

            dictionary.Add(key, value);
        }

        return value;
    }
}

out var will only work if you use C# 7, otherwise you have to split the line.

Or even better with an optional default value you can pass:

public static class DictionaryExtensions
{
    public static TValue GetOrCreate<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, TKey key, TValue defaultValue = null) where TValue : class, new()
    {
        var exists = dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out var value);

        if (!exists)
        {
            value = defaultValue ?? new TValue();

            dictionary.Add(key, value);
        }

        return value;
    }
}
3
  • This doesn't add the newly instanced object to the dictionary, which it should.
    – Maarten
    Apr 20, 2017 at 8:35
  • When exists is true, dictionary.Add() throws because the key already exists. Also, the new object is still not added to the dictionary. Also, what if null is an expected default value?
    – piedar
    Apr 20, 2017 at 15:45
  • @piedar and this is why you don't rush writing code... fixed. Apr 20, 2017 at 19:42

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