5

I've come across this piece of code where it looks like the original developer has tried to use a static string to cache a value in a static class.

public static class GetStringFromSomeProcess
{
    private static string theAnswer;

    public static string GetString
    {
        get
        {
            if(theAnswer == null)
            {
                theAnswer = GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess();
            }
            return theAnswer;
        }
    }
}   

As far as I can see this won't work, as you can't instantiate the GetStringFromSomeProcess class, GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess will be called every time GetString is used. Am I missing something?

1
  • why would you need to instantiate GetStringFromSomeProcess ? After the first call of GetString theAnswer will not be null anymore, so the method with the horrible name will not be called anymore – Mong Zhu Apr 21 '17 at 9:47
4

You are right in saying that the class can't be instantiated, but the class will exist within the application.

Therefore, only the first time the property is accessed, will the method GetStringFromSomeProcess be called. Every other time after that, the check for == null will resolve to false and the value evaluated by the first call will be returned.

2
  • So a static class is instantiated once, the first time it is used and hangs around for the whole life of the application? I think I assumed that because it's static it might be garbage collected because it's not in scope after it's been used. – jonaglon Apr 21 '17 at 10:18
  • Yes that's correct. It remains for the duration that the application is alive. It will never be garbage collected as it is always available. I hope this helps! – Luke Apr 21 '17 at 10:21
4

This will work fine - there is only one instance of theAnswer because it is static - and (also because it is static) it can be accessed from a public static property. This means that any changes made to it will be visible to all code that accesses it. So the first call to GetString will set theAnswer to non-null, and subsequent calls will not make a call to GetStringFromSomeProcess().

However, the solution you posted is not threadsafe because GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess() could be called simultaneously by multiple threads.

.Net provides the Lazy class to solve this issue, as follows:

public static class GetStringFromSomeProcess
{
    private static readonly Lazy<string> _theAnswer = new Lazy<string>(GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess);

    public static string GetString
    {
        get
        {
            return _theAnswer.Value;
        }
    }

    public static string GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess()
    {
        return "X";
    }
}

You supply to the constructor of the Lazy<T> class a method that it can call when needed in order to create the object that it is wrapping. In the example above, I pass GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess to its constructor.

Also note that it's usually a bad idea to have a property that can take a very long time to return. It's better to make it a method:

public static string GetString()
{
    return _theAnswer.Value;
}
2
  • There is a lot of useful stuff in this answer which I am still digesting - thank you. What I don't understand is after the call is made to GetStringFromSomeProcess.GetString why GetStringFromSomeProcess isn't out of scope and the 'cached' variable lost. We're saying that once GetString is used once it hangs around for the whole lifetime of the app which isn't what I expected. – jonaglon Apr 21 '17 at 10:23
  • @jonaglon When GetString is called in your original code, it first checks theAnswer to see if it is null, and only if it is null does it call GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess() and assign the (presumably non-null) result to theAnswer. After the first time, theAnswer will no longer be null and therefore GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess() won't be called any more. – Matthew Watson Apr 21 '17 at 10:50
0

Does it work correctly without creating an object of the GetStringFromSomeProces class? Since the string, theAnswer, is also static, it could potentially work, but I'm wondering when that variable will be initialized. Typically you would code it like you are suggesting with initialization of the GetStringFromSomeProcess Class.

Main.cs

...
GetStringFromSomeProcess getString = new GetStringFromSomeProcess();
string answer = getString.theAnswer();
...

GetStringFromSomeProcess.cs

public class GetStringFromSomeProcess
{
    private string _theAnswer;

    public string theAnswer
    {
        get
        {
            if(theAnswer == null)
            {
                GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess getAnswer = new GoGetTheAnswerFromALongRunningProcess();
                _theAnswer = getAnswer.GetAnswer();
            }
            return _theAnswer;
        }
    }
}
1
  • Because GetStringFromSomeProcess is static new GetStringFromSomeProcess() is not valid code. – jonaglon Apr 21 '17 at 10:23

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