20

I have a type of data that must be stored in a contiguous array which is iterated over for the purpose of updating that data. The tricky part is that I want to have the possibility to dynamically change the way any object is updated.

This is what I have come up with so far:

struct Update {
    virtual void operator()(Data & data) {}
};

struct Data {
    int a, b, c;
    Update * update;
};

struct SpecialBehavior : public Update {
    void operator()(Data & data) override { ... }
};

I would then assign every data object some type of Update. Then during update all data gets passed to its own update functor:

for (Data & data : all)
   data->update(data);

This is as far as I understand called the Strategy Pattern.

My question: is there some way to do this more efficiently? Some way to achieve the same flexibility without the cost of calling a virtual method?

8
  • 2
    Hum. Interesting. Have an upvote. I guess you could do it the C way with a load of function pointers. Is using a virtual function really the bottleneck here?
    – Bathsheba
    Apr 21, 2017 at 10:16
  • Can you double-check your pointers and arrows? I think it's not quite right at the moment.
    – Kerrek SB
    Apr 21, 2017 at 10:18
  • 11
    Did you determine that the virtual call is taking a performance hit?
    – WhiZTiM
    Apr 21, 2017 at 10:18
  • The array of Data is very large, and so even small optimization per object would mean good gains in total. You are right that the cost per object is very small though. Apr 21, 2017 at 10:19
  • 5
    The usual suggestion is to not have one heterogeneous collection, but multiple homogeneous ones.
    – Kerrek SB
    Apr 21, 2017 at 10:19

3 Answers 3

17

What is the overhead of a virtual function call? Well, the implementation must do two things:

  1. Load the vtable pointer from the object.
  2. Load the function pointer from the vtable.

That is precisely two memory indirections. You can avoid exactly one of the two by placing the function pointer directly within the object (avoiding the lookup of the vtable pointer from the object), which is the approach given by ralismarks answer.

This has the downside that it only works well for a single virtual function, if you add more, you will bloat your objects with the function pointers, leading to higher pressure on your caches, and hence likely degrading performance. As long as you are just replacing a single virtual function, that's fine, add three more and you have bloated your object by 24 bytes.


The second memory indirection cannot be avoided unless you ensure that the compiler can derive the real type of Update at compile time. And since it seems to be the whole point of using the virtual function to perform the decision at run time, you are out of luck: Any attempt to "remove" that indirection will yield worse performance.

(I say "remove" in quotes because you can certainly avoid looking up a function pointer from memory. The price will be that you are executing something like a switch() or else if() ladder on some type identifying value loaded from the object, which will turn out to be more costly than just loading the function pointer from the object. The second solution in ralismarks answer does this explicitly, while the std::variant<> approach by Vittorio Romeo hides it within the std::variant<> template. The indirection is not really removed, it's just hidden in even slower operations.)

9
  • 6
    My thoughts exactly. tl;dr: just use virtual functions.
    – TonyK
    Apr 21, 2017 at 11:38
  • 2
    You are actually missing the biggest overhead: the opportunity cost in not being able to inline the function. Apr 21, 2017 at 15:05
  • @MatthieuM. do profile-guided C++ optimisers still not de-virtualise and inline common call destinations with a fast type check to make the virtual call in the uncommon case? Shame, since it hands a magnificent victory to the JITs. Apr 21, 2017 at 16:13
  • @SteveJessop: I don't use profile-guided optimisations. Apr 21, 2017 at 16:26
  • @SteveJessop Even the "fast type check" has to load the vtable pointer from the object, in addition to the value that it compares against. That's slower than the direct use of a single function pointer. Really, virtual calls aren't that expensive, and they are pretty hard to beat in terms of performance if you are not compromising at at least one precondition for the call. Trying to optimize away virtual calls is almost always premature optimization. Apr 21, 2017 at 21:05
11

You could possibly use a function pointer instead.

struct Data;

using Update = void (*)(Data &);

void DefaultUpdate(Data & data) {};

struct Data {
    int a, b, c;
    Update update = DefaultUpdate;
};

void SpecialBehavior(Data & data) { ... };
// ...
Data a;
a.update = &SpecialBehaviour;

This avoids the cost of a virtual function, but still has the cost of a using function pointer (which is less). Since C++11, you can also use non-capturing lambdas (which are implicitly convertible to function pointers).

a.update = [](Data & data) { ... };

Alternatively, you can use an enum and a switch statement.

enum class UpdateType {
    Default,
    Special
};

struct Data {
    int a, b, c;
    UpdateType behavior;
};

void Update(Data & data) {
    switch(data.behavior) {
        case UpdateType::Default:
            DoThis(data);
            break;
        case UpdateType::Special:
            DoThat(data);
            break;
    }
}
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  • 4
    This only removes a single indirection (looking up the vtable pointer from the this pointer), and bloats the object if more than a single virtual function is implemented this way. The later point can easily reduce the performance compared to just declaring the functions virtual. Apr 21, 2017 at 10:42
  • 3
    Unfortunately, the switch will be even slower than the function pointer. I guess, as long as there's only a single function to switch, your first solution is actually the fastest possible approach :-) Apr 21, 2017 at 11:11
  • 5
    "This avoids the cost of a virtual function, but still has the cost of a using function pointer (which is less)" - please cite your source, or show benchmarks which prove it. Apr 21, 2017 at 11:28
  • 2
    @cmaster: the switch will be even slower than the function pointer => Have you measured it? When branch prediction is right, branches cost really really little... up to being invisible. Apr 21, 2017 at 15:00
  • 5
    @cmaster the switch has much more optimization potential due to inlining the functions which could then extract common parts, constant fold data from data, ... Apr 21, 2017 at 15:28
5

If you don't need open-set polymorphism (i.e. you know in advance all types that will derive from Update) you can use a variant like std::variant or boost::variant:

struct Update0 { void operator()(Data & data) { /* ... */ } };
struct Update1 { void operator()(Data & data) { /* ... */ } };
struct Update2 { void operator()(Data & data) { /* ... */ } };

struct Data {
    int a, b, c;
    std::variant<Update0, Update1, Update2> update;
};

for (Data & data : all)
{
    std::visit(data.update, [&data](auto& x){ x(data); });
}

This will allow you to:

  • Avoid the cost of a virtual function call.

  • Store your Data instances in a cache-friendly manner.

  • Have Update classes with different interfaces or arbitrarily different state.


Altenatively, if you want to allow open-set polymorphism but only through a operator()(Data&) interface, you can use something like function_view, which is a basically a type-safe reference to a function object with a particular signature.

struct Data {
    int a, b, c;
    function_view<void(Data&)> update_function;
};

for (Data & data : all)
{
    data.update_function(data);
}
3
  • 1
    And what do you think how std::variant<> disambiguates between its different types? I'd wager that it will hold an integer that says which of the types is currently valid. Interpreting such an integer will always be slower than the vtable indirection of a virtual call. Apr 21, 2017 at 10:51
  • 2
    @cmaster OTOH, a std::vector<std::variant<>> might be better on the cache because all the data is stored in contiguous memory. Using an abstract class in a std::vector often requires heap allocation that may be sparse (although for most cases, you probably won't notice the difference)
    – Justin
    Apr 21, 2017 at 20:59
  • @Justin Good point about consecutive memory. Then again, I would argue that it's likely even more efficient to just put pointers to just a hand full of Update objects into the objects within the vector: The reuse of the objects reduces the overall memory footprint and places the contents of the few Update objects firmly in L1 cache. Of course, the details depend on the specific use case at hand, and you may well be right that the vector<variant<>> is so much more cache friendly that it turns out to be faster than a virtual call. However, variant<> won't beat a function pointer. Apr 21, 2017 at 21:20

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