9

One method is a standard async method, like this one :

private static async Task AutoRetryHandlerAsync_Worker(Func<Task<bool>> taskToRun,...)

I have tested two implementations, one that use await and the other uses .Wait()

The two implementations are not equal at all because the same tests are failing with the await version but not the Wait() one.

The goal of this method is to "execute a Task returned by the input function, and retry by executing the same function until it works" (with limitations to stop automatically if a certain number of tries is reached).

This works:

private static async Task AutoRetryHandlerAsync_Worker(Func<Task<bool>> taskToRun,...)
{
    try {
       await taskToRun();
    }
    catch(Exception) 
   {
       // Execute later, and wait the result to complete
       await Task.Delay(currentDelayMs).ContinueWith(t =>
       {
            // Wait for the recursive call to complete
            AutoRetryHandlerAsync_Worker(taskToRun).Wait();
       });

       // Stop
       return;
    }    
}

And this (with async t => and the usage of await instead of t => and the usage of .Wait() doesn't work at all because the result of the recursive call is not awaited before the final return; is executed :

private static async Task AutoRetryHandlerAsync_Worker(Func<Task<bool>> taskToRun,...)
{
    try {
       await taskToRun();
    }
    catch(Exception) 
   {
       // Execute later, and wait the result to complete
       await Task.Delay(currentDelayMs).ContinueWith(async t =>
       {
            // Wait for the recursive call to complete
            await AutoRetryHandlerAsync_Worker(taskToRun);
       });

       // Stop
       return;
    }    
}

I'm trying to understand why this simple change does change everything, when it's supposed to do the exact same thing : waiting the ContinueWith completion.

If I extract the task ran by the ContinueWith method, I do see the state of the ContinueWith function passing to "ranToCompletion" before the return of the inner await completes.

Why? Isn't it supposed to be awaited?


Concrete testable behaviour

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    long o = 0;
    Task.Run(async () =>
    {
        // #1 await
        await Task.Delay(1000).ContinueWith(async t =>
        {
            // #2 await
            await Task.Delay(1000).ContinueWith(t2 => {
                o = 10;
            });
        });
        var hello = o;
    });


    Task.Delay(10000).Wait();
}

Why does var hello = o; is reached before o=10?

Isn't the #1 await supposed to hang on before the execution can continue?

  • 1
    No, it doesn't pause the thread. It hands control back to its caller. That's the point of these mechanisms - to keep threads doing useful work rather than idly waiting for other threads/IO to do work. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 21 '17 at 12:29
  • 8
    ContinueWith doesn't handle "async lambda" and doesn't wait for the task returned by the lambda to complete, instead it simply returns the task back through ContinueWith and lets someone else await it. You will need await await to handle this. – Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 21 '17 at 12:38
  • 1
    @LasseV.Karlsen give a full answer comments are rarely fully read – BRAHIM Kamel Apr 21 '17 at 12:55
  • 1
    @MicaëlFélix it's just a matter of return type. In your case the ContinueWith internal method retruns a Task. You could also do var myTask = await Task.Delay(1000).ContinueWith(async t => ...); and then await myTask; If you won't await at all the original return type is Task<Task> – Ofir Winegarten Apr 21 '17 at 13:08
  • 1
    Not an answer to the question, but you can do an easier and probably more performant implementation with a simply while loop instead of the manual continuation and recursion: while (true) { try { await taskToRun(); return; } catch (Exception) { await Task.Delay(currentDelayMs); } } – Matthias247 Apr 21 '17 at 13:11
6

The lambda syntax obscures the fact that you ContinueWith(async void ...).

async void methods are not awaited and any errors they throw will go unobserved.

And to your base question, retrying from within a catch is not a recommended practice anyway. Too much going on, catch blocks should be simple. And bluntly retrying for all exception types is also very suspect. You ought to have an idea what errors could warrant a retry, and let the rest pass.

Go for simplicity and readability:

while (count++ < N)
{
   try
   {          
      MainAction();
      break;      
   }
   catch(MoreSpecificException ex) { /* Log or Ignore */ }

   Delay();
}
  • 1
    I agree that the recursivity is not necessary in my case. I'll go for your solution. – Micaël Félix Apr 21 '17 at 13:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.