0

Ok, so I'm working on a Wordpress project (PHP) using Advanced Custom Fields and a little bit of PHP. I've created 2 functions that will create a container div around some text:

<section>

 <?php container_start(); ?>

   Text goes here

 <?php container_end(); ?>

</section>

This generates the following code:

<section>

 <div class="container">

  Text goes here

 </div>

</section>

This is great as it works as expected. What is going behind the scenes are these 2 functions:

function container_start() {

$container = get_sub_field('container'); 

if ($container): 
echo '<div class="container">';
endif; 

}

function container_end() {

$container = get_sub_field('container'); 

if ($container): 
echo '</div>';
endif; 

}

Question is: Is there a way to optimize how is this accomplished? I find it not too practical having to call 2 functions just to add and then close a div. Is there a way I could wrap this into just one call?

0

Well you still have to use two functions but maybe you could do something like this :

function container_start() {
    ob_start();
}
function container_end() {
    $container = get_sub_field('container'); 

    if ($container)
        echo '<div class="container">';
    echo ob_get_contents();
    ob_end_clean();
    if ($container)
        echo '</div>';
}

So what would that do : When you call container_start, ob_start says to php to keep everything that is printed

Then, when you call container_end, you do the container thing and then you call ob_get_contents which returns everything that php kept (and you echo it) and ob_end_clean that says to php to stop keeping everything that is printed

This way, you still have two functions, but get_sub_field('container') will only be called once

0

An advantage of your current setup is that the tags are balanced: there is an opening "tag" and a matching closing "tag". While this does require that you manage the balancing of your tags, I think this is cleaner than the alternatives, and matches how you do things in HTML. Any additional magic you add on top of this (like maybe tracking some stack of tags and having a general purpose end() function) adds complexity and could affect readability. WordPress doesn't use a templating language on top of PHP, so you're not going to get much better than you've already got.


That said, one option that obviates a closing tag is to pass a multi-line string to your function. I'm not big on this method, but it is available and may be a jumping-off point for other methods.

<?php

$var = 'foo';

function wrapper_function($inner) {
    echo '<div class="container">';
    echo $inner;
    echo '</div>';
}

?>

Something before.

<?php wrapper_function(<<<EOF
   This text goes inside. I can put <html> in here, plus
   any $var since I'm using HEREDOC rather than NOWDOC.

   http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php#language.types.string.syntax.heredoc
EOF
); ?>

Something after.

Output:

Something before.

<div class="container">   This text goes inside. I can put <html> in here, plus
   any foo since I'm using HEREDOC rather than NOWDOC.

   http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php#language.types.string.syntax.heredoc</div>
Something after.

One downside: you can't nest your functions using this method.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.