22

For example: There are four items in an array. I want to get one randomly, like this:

array items = [
    "bike"    //40% chance to select
    "car"     //30% chance to select
    "boat"    //15% chance to select
    "train"   //10% chance to select
    "plane"   //5%  chance to select
]
1

6 Answers 6

52

Both answers above rely on methods that will get slow quickly, especially the accepted one.

function weighted_random(items, weights) {
    var i;

    for (i = 0; i < weights.length; i++)
        weights[i] += weights[i - 1] || 0;
    
    var random = Math.random() * weights[weights.length - 1];
    
    for (i = 0; i < weights.length; i++)
        if (weights[i] > random)
            break;
    
    return items[i];
}

I replaced my older ES6 solution with this one as of December 2020, as ES6 isn't supported in older browsers, and I personally think this one is more readable.

If you'd rather use objects with the properties item and weight:

function weighted_random(options) {
    var i;

    var weights = [];

    for (i = 0; i < options.length; i++)
        weights[i] = options[i].weight + (weights[i - 1] || 0);
    
    var random = Math.random() * weights[weights.length - 1];
    
    for (i = 0; i < weights.length; i++)
        if (weights[i] > random)
            break;
    
    return options[i].item;
}

Explanation:

I've made this diagram that shows how this works:

Diagram showing items' weights and how they add up and interact with the random numbers. Without this diagram this explanation isn't very helpful, so feel free to ask me any questions about it in a comment if it won't render for you.

This diagram shows what happens when an input with the weights [5, 2, 8, 3] is given. By taking partial sums of the weights, you just need to find the first one that's as large as a random number, and that's the randomly chosen item.

If a random number is chosen right on the border of two weights, like with 7 and 15 in the diagram, we go with the longer one. This is because 0 can be chosen by Math.random but 1 can't, so we get a fair distribution. If we went with the shorter one, A could be chosen 6 out of 18 times (0, 1, 2, 3, 4), giving it a higher weight than it should have.

23
  • 4
    You might want to clarify what "answer #2" is. Answers are ordered by votes so their order can change. People can also have a different sorting for answers (e.g. by oldest first.)
    – JJJ
    May 4, 2019 at 19:05
  • Just to clarify: The for loop one is the fastest, but less readable. This solution, at 200,000 ops/sec, isn't terribly slow either. May 4, 2019 at 19:30
  • 1
    @Envayo Nope, no difference. It bases it off of the sum of the weights, so you can scale it however you want. Jan 9 at 19:55
  • 1
    @LovelyWeather89 You can use a for loop going over the array backwards, checking if i (the for loop variable) is equal to items.indexOf(items[i]). If it's not, that means the item at i is a duplicate. And then you just need to .push any non-duplicate items and their weights into empty arrays. Something like this. May 3 at 12:47
  • 1
    @LovelyWeather89 Oh my mistake, the i++ should be i--, and the > should be >=. If you just want to remove duplicates in an ordinary array though, instead of the items/weights used in this answer, you can do Array.from(new Set(x)) where x is the array to remove duplicates from. May 4 at 13:31
7

Some es6 approach, with wildcard handling:

const randomizer = (values) => {
    let i, pickedValue,
            randomNr = Math.random(),
            threshold = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
        if (values[i].probability === '*') {
            continue;
        }

        threshold += values[i].probability;
        if (threshold > randomNr) {
                pickedValue = values[i].value;
                break;
        }

        if (!pickedValue) {
            //nothing found based on probability value, so pick element marked with wildcard
            pickedValue = values.filter((value) => value.probability === '*');
        }
    }

    return pickedValue;
}

Example usage:

let testValues = [{
    value : 'aaa',
    probability: 0.1
},
{
    value : 'bbb',
    probability: 0.3
},
{
    value : 'ccc',
    probability: '*'
}]

randomizer(testValues); // will return "aaa" in 10% calls, 
//"bbb" in 30% calls, and "ccc" in 60% calls;
1
  • 2
    Make sure to have your values already sorted by probability
    – O'Neill
    Nov 21, 2020 at 15:04
1

Here's a faster way of doing that then other answers suggested...

You can achieve what you want by:

  1. dividing the 0-to-1 segment into sections for each element based on their probability (For example, an element with probability 60% will take 60% of the segment).
  2. generating a random number and checking in which segment it lands.

STEP 1

make a prefix sum array for the probability array, each value in it will signify where its corresponding section ends.

For example: If we have probabilities: 60% (0.6), 30%, 5%, 3%, 2%. the prefix sum array will be: [0.6,0.9,0.95,0.98,1]

so we will have a segment divided like this (approximately): [ | | ||]

STEP 2

generate a random number between 0 and 1, and find it's lower bound in the prefix sum array. the index you'll find is the index of the segment that the random number landed in

Here's how you can implement this method:

let obj = {
    "Common": "60",
    "Uncommon": "25",
    "Rare": "10",
    "Legendary": "0.01",
    "Mythical": "0.001"
}
// turning object into array and creating the prefix sum array:
let sums = [0]; // prefix sums;
let keys = [];
for(let key in obj) {
    keys.push(key);
    sums.push(sums[sums.length-1] + parseFloat(obj[key])/100);
}
sums.push(1);
keys.push('NONE');
// Step 2:
function lowerBound(target, low = 0, high = sums.length - 1) {
    if (low == high) {
        return low;
    }
    const midPoint = Math.floor((low + high) / 2);
  
    if (target < sums[midPoint]) {
        return lowerBound(target, low, midPoint);
    } else if (target > sums[midPoint]) {
        return lowerBound(target, midPoint + 1, high);
    } else {
        return midPoint + 1;
    }
}

function getRandom() {
    return lowerBound(Math.random());
}

console.log(keys[getRandom()], 'was picked!');

hope you find this helpful. Note: (In Computer Science) the lower bound of a value in a list/array is the smallest element that is greater or equal to it. for example, array:[1,10,24,99] and value 12. the lower bound will be the element with value 24. When the array is sorted from smallest to biggest (like in our case) finding the lower bound of every value can be done extremely quickly with binary searching (O(log(n))).

3
  • I'm sorry, this is helpful but could you please provide an example of it being used too?
    – Jon
    Aug 15, 2021 at 15:03
  • Code doesn't return based on probability defined - I ran it 100,000 times and got 0 common, 5990 uncommon, 25144 rare, etc.
    – Jon
    Aug 15, 2021 at 20:21
  • the 0 at the start is not part of the keys, it's 59900 common, 25144 uncommon etc.
    – atanay
    Aug 15, 2021 at 21:48
0

I added my solution as a method that works well on smaller arrays (no caching):

    static weight_random(arr, weight_field){
    
        if(arr == null || arr === undefined){
            return null;
        }
        const totals = [];
        let total = 0;
        for(let i=0;i<arr.length;i++){
            total += arr[i][weight_field];
            totals.push(total);
        }
        const rnd = Math.floor(Math.random() * total);
        let selected = arr[0];
        for(let i=0;i<totals.length;i++){
            if(totals[i] > rnd){
                selected = arr[i];
                break;
            }
        }
    return selected;

}

Run it like this (provide the array and the weight property):

const wait_items =  [
    {"w" : 20, "min_ms" : "5000", "max_ms" : "10000"},
    {"w" : 20, "min_ms" : "10000", "max_ms" : "20000"},
    {"w" : 20, "min_ms" : "40000", "max_ms" : "80000"}
]   

const item = weight_random(wait_items, "w");
console.log(item);
0

ES2015 version of Radvylf Programs's answer

function getWeightedRandomItem(items) {
    const weights = items.reduce((acc, item, i) => {
        acc.push(item.weight + (acc[i - 1] || 0));
        return acc;
    }, []);
    const random = Math.random() * weights[weights.length - 1];
    return items[weights.findIndex((weight) => weight > random)];
}

And ES2022

function getWeightedRandomItem(items) {
    const weights = items.reduce((acc, item, i) => {
        acc.push(item.weight + (acc[i - 1] ?? 0));
        return acc;
    }, []);
    const random = Math.random() * weights.at(-1);
    return items[weights.findIndex((weight) => weight > random)];
}
-2

Sure you can. Here's a simple code to do it:

    // Object or Array. Which every you prefer.
var item = {
    bike:40, // Weighted Probability
    care:30, // Weighted Probability
    boat:15, // Weighted Probability
    train:10, // Weighted Probability
    plane:5 // Weighted Probability
    // The number is not really percentage. You could put whatever number you want.
    // Any number less than 1 will never occur
};

function get(input) {
    var array = []; // Just Checking...
    for(var item in input) {
        if ( input.hasOwnProperty(item) ) { // Safety
            for( var i=0; i<input[item]; i++ ) {
                array.push(item);
            }
        }
    }
    // Probability Fun
    return array[Math.floor(Math.random() * array.length)];
}

console.log(get(item)); // See Console.
2
  • 4
    This works reasonably well for small integers (which was also my use case), but since it works by creating a new array with a length equal to the sum of the weights, it could become huge/slow with high numbers. It also doesn't work for non-integers, so you would need to find the lowest common denominator to get to an integer (which may not be possible for very precise weights).
    – mattsoave
    Jan 24, 2018 at 20:04
  • 2
    @mattsoave Yeah, this is already several thousand times slower than the second answer, and that's with five options. Apr 14, 2019 at 4:23

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