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What would be the most efficient way to calculate the sum of Fibonacci numbers from F(n) to F(m) where F(n) and F(m) are nth and mth Fibonacci numbers respectively and 0 =< n <= m <109 (with F(0)=0, F(1)=1).

For example, if n=0, m=3, we need to find F(0)+F(1)+F(2)+F(3).

Just by brute force it will take long time for the range of n and m mentioned. If it can be done via matrix exponentiation then how?

3
  • I would be very happy to know the application of this answer!
    – rjobidon
    Dec 5 '10 at 3:51
  • 3
    I think we've teased you long enough, in particular with the hint about Binet (instead you should use linear algebra as hinted in your question). Also beware that The F(m+2) - F(n+2) - 2 isn't quite correct but you can figure it out given that the sum of fibo # to n is effectively F(n+2) -1 (hint: you want the sum inclusive of F(n) and hence you need to substract the sum of fibo # up to n-1 and substract this from F(m+2) -2). Anyway... it looking and smelling like HOMEWORK, the SO community shouldn't help too much ;-)
    – mjv
    Dec 5 '10 at 4:50
  • 2
    @mjv - it smells like coding competition problem to me
    – Attila
    Apr 13 '12 at 21:07
22

The first two answers (oldest ones) are seemingly incorrect to me. According to this discussion which is already cited in one of the answers, sum of first n Fibonacci numbers is given by:

SumFib(n) = F[n+2] - 1                          (1)

Now, lets define SumFib(m, n) as sum of Fibonacci numbers from m to n inclusive (as required by OP) (see footnote). So:

SumFib(m, n) = SumFib(n) - SumFib(m-1)

Note the second term. It is so because SumFib(m) includes F[m], but we want sum from F[m] to F[n] inclusive. So we subtract sum up to F[m-1] from sum up to F[n]. Simple kindergarten maths, isn't it? :-)

SumFib(m, n) = SumFib(n) - SumFib(m-1)
             = (F[n+2] - 1) - (F[m-1 + 2] - 1)    [using eq(1)]
             = F[n+2] - 1 - F[m+1] + 1
             = F[n+2] - F[m+1]

Therefore, SumFib(m, n) = F[n+2] - F[m+1]                    (2)

Example:

m = 3, n = 7
Sum = F[3] + F[4] + F[5] + F[6] + F[7]
    = 2 + 3 + 5 + 8 + 13
    = 31

And by using (2) derived above:

SumFib(3, 7) = F[7+2] - F[3+1]
             = F[9] - F[4]
             = 34 - 3
             = 31

Bonus:
When m and n are large, you need efficient algorithms to generate Fibonacci numbers. Here is a very good article that explains one way to do it.


Footnote: In the question m and n of OP satisfy this range: 0 =< n <= m, but in my answer the range is a bit altered, it is 0 =< m <= n.

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  • +1. I'm very surprised at the upvotes on the two answers above yours. Should we really expect that SumFib(n,n) <= 0 as they claim if the sum is inclusive? Apr 29 '17 at 19:26
  • Thanks @Daenerys . I don't think so. SumFib(n, n) should very sensibly equal Fib(n). May 1 '17 at 14:05
  • Thanks! this should be the right answer. Saved my day :)
    – Shankar
    Apr 12 '18 at 23:09
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Given that "the sum of the first n Fibonacci numbers is the (n + 2)nd Fibonacci number minus 1." (thanks, Wikipedia), you can calculate F(m + 2) - F(n + 2) (shouldn't have had -2, see Sнаđошƒаӽ's answer for what I'd overlooked). Use Binet's Fibonacci number formula to quickly calculate F(m + 2) and F(n + 2). Seems fairly efficient to me.

Update: found an old SO post, "nth fibonacci number in sublinear time", and (due to accuracy as mjv and Jim Lewis have pointed out in the comments), you can't really escape an O(n) solution to calculate F(n).

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  • @MrGomez had to +1 you too for beating me to the basic formula :)
    – jball
    Dec 5 '10 at 4:03
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    All good on the formula. When it comes to computation, you'll need a mighty precise calculation of Phi and/or sqrt(5) to use Binet on big numbers...
    – mjv
    Dec 5 '10 at 4:07
  • @mjv, true - I'm not sure how precise they need to be to avoid rounding errors out to F(1 billion)...
    – jball
    Dec 5 '10 at 4:11
  • @jball: F(10^9) has about 204 million digits, if I've calculated correctly, so you'll probably need to know phi and its large powers to that precision.
    – Jim Lewis
    Dec 5 '10 at 4:24
  • @Jim Lewis, seems like a traditional iteration is the way to go for the larger values then. That would be pretty slow out in the millions, though.
    – jball
    Dec 5 '10 at 4:34
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F(m+2) - F(n+2) - 2 (discussion)

Literally, the sum of your upper bound m, minus the sum of your lower bound n.

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  • 3
    This is not completely correct. The answer is simply F(m+2) - F(n+2), since the (-1) terms cancel out. Apr 3 '16 at 17:14
  • @JørgenFogh Not that it is not completely correct, it is actually completely incorrect. No offence to the OP of the answer. Dec 2 '16 at 10:37
  • @Sнаđошƒаӽ The idea is correct though. The answer is consistently off by 2, not completely unrelated to the correct answer. Dec 2 '16 at 15:26
  • @JørgenFogh Yeah right. BTW, I have added an answer of my own on this post. You are welcome to take a look and make a comment ;-) Dec 3 '16 at 13:50
1

Algorithm via matrix property explanation found here and here

class Program
{
    static int FibMatrix(int n, int i, int h, int j, int k)
    {
        int t = 0;

        while (n > 0)
        {
            if (n % 2 == 1)
            {
                t = j * h;
                j = i * h + j * k + t;
                i = i * k + t;
            }
            t = h * h;
            h = 2 * k * h + t;
            k = k * k + t;
            n = n / 2;
        }

        return j;            
    }

    static int FibSum(int n, int m)
    {
        int sum = Program.FibMatrix(n, 1, 1, 0, 0);

        while (n + 1 <= m)
        {
            sum += Program.FibMatrix(n + 1, 1, 1, 0, 0);
            n++;
        }

        return sum;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Output : 4
        Console.WriteLine(Program.FibSum(0, 4).ToString());

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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The answer is:

f(m+2)-f(n+1)

Example:

for n = 3 to m = 8

Ans1 = f(m+2) = f(10) = 55

Ans2 = f(n+1) = f(4) = 3 

Answer = 55 - 3 = 52

Now to calculate the Nth fibonacci in O(logN) you can use matrix Exponentiation method

Link:- http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/program-for-nth-fibonacci-number/

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