2

Why do you need (in order to make it compile) the intermediate CloneImplementation and std::static_pointer_cast (see Section 3 below) to use the Clone pattern for std::shared_ptr instead of something closer (see Section 2 below) to the use of raw pointers (see Section 1 below)? Because as far as I understand, std::shared_ptr has a generalized copy constructor and a generalized assignment operator?

1. Clone pattern with raw pointers:

#include <iostream>

struct Base {
    virtual Base *Clone() const {
        std::cout << "Base::Clone\n";
        return new Base(*this);
    }
};

struct Derived : public Base {
    virtual Derived *Clone() const override {
        std::cout << "Derived::Clone\n";
        return new Derived(*this);
    }
};

int main() {
  Base *b = new Derived;
  b->Clone();
}

2. Clone pattern with shared pointers (naive attempt):

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

struct Base {
    virtual std::shared_ptr< Base > Clone() const {
        std::cout << "Base::Clone\n";
        return std::shared_ptr< Base >(new Base(*this));
    }
};
struct Derived : public Base {
    virtual std::shared_ptr< Derived > Clone() const override {
        std::cout << "Derived::Clone\n";
        return std::shared_ptr< Derived >(new Derived(*this));
    }
};

int main() {
  Base *b = new Derived;
  b->Clone();
}

Output:

error: invalid covariant return type for 'virtual std::shared_ptr<Derived> Derived::Clone() const'
error:   overriding 'virtual std::shared_ptr<Base> Base::Clone() const'

3. Clone pattern with shared pointers:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

struct Base {

    std::shared_ptr< Base > Clone() const {
        std::cout << "Base::Clone\n";
        return CloneImplementation();
    }

private:

    virtual std::shared_ptr< Base > CloneImplementation() const {
        std::cout << "Base::CloneImplementation\n";
        return std::shared_ptr< Base >(new Base(*this));
    }
};
struct Derived : public Base {

    std::shared_ptr< Derived > Clone() const {
        std::cout << "Derived::Clone\n";
        return std::static_pointer_cast< Derived >(CloneImplementation());
    }

private:

    virtual std::shared_ptr< Base > CloneImplementation() const override {
        std::cout << "Derived::CloneImplementation\n";
        return std::shared_ptr< Derived >(new Derived(*this));
    }
};

int main() {
  Base *b = new Derived;
  b->Clone();
}
3

The general rule in C++ is that the overriding function must have the same signature as the function it overrides. The only difference is that covariance is allowed on pointers and references: if the inherited function returns A* or A&, the overrider can return B* or B& respectively, as long as A is a base class of B. This rule is what allows Section 1 to work.

On the other hand, std::shared_ptr<Derived> and std::shared_ptr<Base> are two totally distinct types with no inheritance relationship between them. It's therefore not possible to return one instead of the other from an overrider. Section 2 is conceptually the same as trying to override virtual int f() with std::string f() override.

That's why some extra mechanism is needed to make smart pointers behave covariantly. What you've shown as Section 3 is one such possible mechanism. It's the most general one, but in some cases, alternatives also exist. For example this:

struct Base {
    std::shared_ptr< Base > Clone() const {
        std::cout << "Base::Clone\n";
        return std::shared_ptr< Base >(CloneImplementation());
    }

private:
    virtual Base* CloneImplementation() const {
        return new Base(*this);
    }
};

struct Derived : public Base {
     std::shared_ptr< Derived > Clone() const {
        std::cout << "Derived::Clone\n";
        return std::shared_ptr< Derived >(CloneImplementation());
    }

private:
    virtual Derived* CloneImplementation() const override {
        std::cout << "Derived::CloneImplementation\n";
        return new Derived(*this);
    }
};
  • So covariance is completely independent of implicit type casts (which are allowed due to the generalized copy constructor in std::shared_ptr)? – Matthias Apr 24 '17 at 12:20
  • 2
    @Matthias Yes, it's defined purely in terms of pointer or reference to derived class. – Reinstate Monica Apr 24 '17 at 12:30
  • As a side note, if the compiler would look at valid implicit type conversions (which include derived pointer to base pointer and derived reference to base reference), which are all valid Liskov substitutions, could this break backwards compatibility (and if not this could actually be added to a future C++ standard)? – Matthias Apr 24 '17 at 12:55
  • 1
    The rules already require the support of almost arbitrary complex pointer conversions, so generalizing to user define conversion would probably be very easy. – curiousguy Apr 29 '17 at 5:29
  • The key difference between pointers and templates is that Derived* and Base* will always have exactly the same representation (i.e same as void*) whereas templates may not even have the same size (e.g unique_ptr with custom destructors) . – Nick H Sep 25 at 8:26

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