Just to train myself a bit of Typescript I wrote a simple ES6 Map+Set-like implementation based on plain JS Object. It works only for primitive keys, so no buckets, no hash-codes, etc. The problem I encountered is implementing delete method. Using plain delete is just unacceptably slow. For large maps it's about 300-400x slower than ES6 Map delete. I noticed the huge performance degradation if size of the object is large. On Node JS 7.9.0 (and Chrome 57 for example) if object has 50855 properties delete performance is the same as ES6 Map. But for 50856 properties the ES6 Map is faster on 2 orders of magnitude. Here is the simple code to reproduce:

// for node 6: 76300
// for node 7: 50855
const N0 = 50855;

function fast() {
	const N = N0

	const o = {}
	for ( let i = 0; i < N; i++ ) {
		o[i] = i
	}

	const t1 = Date.now()
	for ( let i = 0; i < N; i++ ) {
		delete o[i]
	}
	const t2 = Date.now()

	console.log( N / (t2 - t1) + ' KOP/S' )
}

function slow() {
	const N = N0 + 1 // adding just 1

	const o = {}
	for ( let i = 0; i < N; i++ ) {
		o[i] = i
	}

	const t1 = Date.now()
	for ( let i = 0; i < N; i++ ) {
		delete o[i]
	}
	const t2 = Date.now()

	console.log( N / (t2 - t1) + ' KOP/S' )
}

fast()

slow()

I guess I could instead of delete properties just set them to undefined or some guard object, but this will mess the code, because hasOwnProperty will not work correctly, for...in loops will need additional check and so on. Are there more nice solutions?

P.S. I'm using node 7.9.0 on OSX Sierra

Edited Thanks for comments guys, I fixed OP/S => KOP/S. I think I asked rather badly specified question, so I changed the title. After some investigation I found out that for example in Firefox there is no such problems -- deleting cost grows linearly. So it's problem of super smart V8. And I think it's just a bug:(

up vote 10 down vote accepted

(V8 developer here.) Yes, this is a known issue. The underlying problem is that objects should switch their elements backing store from a flat array to a dictionary when they become too sparse, and the way this has historically been implemented was for every delete operation to check if enough elements were still present for that transition not to happen yet. The bigger the array, the more time this check took. Under certain conditions (recently created objects below a certain size), the check was skipped -- the resulting impressive speedup is what you're observing in the fast() case.

I've taken this opportunity to fix the (frankly quite silly) behavior of the regular/slow path. It should be sufficient to check every now and then, not on every single delete. The fix will be in V8 6.0, which should be picked up by Node in a few months (I believe Node 8 is supposed to get it at some point).

That said, using delete causes various forms and magnitudes of slowdown in many situations, because it tends to make things more complicated, forcing the engine (any engine) to perform more checks and/or fall off various fast paths. It is generally recommended to avoid using delete whenever possible. Since you have ES6 maps/sets, use them! :-)

  • Thank you! I think this clarifies the whole thing:) – user3031051 May 17 '17 at 19:22
  • @jmrk Thanks for the response. Could you clarify you last comment on using maps/sets? I have a couple of objects that change all the time and the code uses delete. Would I be better using a Map and use the Map.delete(item)? – leonormes Mar 14 at 11:32
  • @leonormes: Yes, that's the recommendation. Using a Map tells the engine "I'm going to use this thing as a map, so don't even bother trying to detect what use case to optimize its internal representation for". – jmrk Mar 14 at 20:27

To answer the question "why adding 1 to N slows the delete operation".

My guess: the slowness comes from the way the memory is allocated for your Object.

Try changing your code to this:

(() => {
    const N = 50855

    const o = {}
    for ( let i = 0; i < N; i++ ) {
        o[i] = i
    }

    // Show the heap memory allocated
    console.log(process.memoryUsage().heapTotal);
    const t1 = Date.now()
    for ( let i = 0; i < N; i++ ) {
        delete o[i]
    }
    const t2 = Date.now()

    console.log( N / (t2 - t1) + ' OP/S' )
})();

Now, when you run with N = 50855 the memory allocated is: "8306688 bytes" (8.3MB)

When you run with N = 50856 the memory allocated is: "8929280 bytes" (8.9MB).

So you got a 600kb increase in the size of the memory allocated, only by adding one more key to your Object.

Now, I say I "guess" that this is where the slowness come from, but I think it makes sense for the delete function to be slower as the size of your Object increases.

If you try with N = 70855 you would still have same 8.9MB used. This is because usually memory allocators allocate memory in fixed "batches" while increasing the size of an Array/Object in order to reduce the number of memory allocations they do.

Now, same thing might happen with delete and the GC. The memory you delete has to be picked up by the GC, and if the Object size is larger the GC will be slower. Also the memory might be released if the number of keys goes under a specific number.

(You should read about memory allocation for dynamic arrays if you want to know more; there was a cool article on what increase rate you should use for memory allocation, I can't find it atm :( )

PS: delete is not "extremely slow", you just compute the op/s wrong. The time passed is in milliseconds, not in seconds so you have to multiply by 1000.

  • Thanks, edited code snipplet OP/S => KOP/S. But this not that important. The x300-400 performance degradation is. I think the problem is just the bug in smart implementation of objects in V8. Or maybe V8 authors think instead of using objects as hashtables use ES6 Map already! It's 2K17:) – user3031051 Apr 25 '17 at 14:09

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