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I have a signup table with millions of email id record in it. Email ids are unique. What is the best way to index them and fetch them back using asp.net for authentication purpose? I mean should I define email id column as a clustered unique index rather than UNIQUE?

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    Are you using MySQL or MSSQL? MySQL doesn't have clustered unique index. You could hash the email (say, with sha1) and save it as binary, which reduces footprint to 20 bytes every time, and next to that column have the plaintext value of email address. Make the hash unique, now you have fixed-length unique identifier.
    – Mjh
    Apr 25, 2017 at 8:07
  • What is the point of hashing the email addresses, convert them into binary and then storing them in the database next to email column. It will increase the size of the database. It will not solve my problem rather would increase it. I want to reduce the query time by implementing indexing.
    – Deep
    Apr 25, 2017 at 8:33
  • email addresses have variable length. If you hash a variable length value, your indexes will vary, and there are other issues with indexes when you try to index a value that's too large. To reduce that problem, you don't index the actual string-value of the email but its hash because hashes are fixed-length. It does solve your problem and you don't have anything to convert back or forth.
    – Mjh
    Apr 25, 2017 at 9:25
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    @Mjh - a MySQL (with InnoDB) PRIMARY KEY is UNIQUE and clustered.
    – Rick James
    Apr 28, 2017 at 1:57
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    @RickJames also, given the context of this question and what OP is doing - yes, he can simply skip auto_increment and use email as primary key. Whether that's useful, faster, whether it does what he's after - he'll have to test. One thing is for sure - it really helps to have a nice number giving you record identification. That's my personal opinion. Your solution probably works, there's no indication it doesn't. I'll have a look at Jeremy Cole's blog, thanks for the pointer!
    – Mjh
    May 2, 2017 at 15:19

4 Answers 4

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When you have a variable length textual input, such as e-mail or addresses, but you want them to be unique then the standard approach is to index the hash of that value.

Reason: hashes are fixed-length, and you are avoiding problems with text-data exceeding index length.

According to your comment, the table you have would look like this (I purposely omitted password and mobile number):

create table users (
    user_id int not null unsigned auto_increment,
    first_name varchar(255) not null,
    surname varchar(255) default null,
    email varchar(255) not null,
    primary key(id)
) engine = innodb;

I would alter that table and add a field that contains email hash. I'd maintain this has via a trigger, so that you can focus on getting valid data in without worrying about creating hashes. To do so, the field would be binary(20) since it will contain a raw hash and that takes 20 bytes. Since we want to maintain it via trigger, then we need to make that field nullable and unique. Note: you can make it binary(40)

Table:

create table users (
    user_id int not null unsigned auto_increment,
    email_hash binary(20) default null, -- this is the field in question
    first_name varchar(255) not null,
    surname varchar(255) default null,
    email varchar(255) not null,
    primary key(id),
    unique(email_hash) -- this is the unique index over the hash
) engine = innodb;

What we need now is a trigger that deals with email hashes. I'll show how to create the trigger which maintains this info before inserting. Similar logic applies for updating the table:

DELIMITER $$

CREATE TRIGGER users_before_insert BEFORE INSERT ON `users` 

FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
    SET NEW.email_hash = UNHEX(SHA1(new.email)); -- You can remove UNHEX if you want human-readable value. You'll need binary(40) to hold it then
END;

DELIMITER ;

From within your application, you'd simply provide values for first name, surname and email. MySQL will take care of duplicates and it will signal you with the state of 23000. I don't know how to use asp.net so you'll have to adjust to its error handling somehow.

You can handle hashes from within your asp.net application, but if you feel more comfortable by having the database do this - I showed how to achieve it via triggers.

The same rule would apply for mobile number, if you require it to be unique or any other fields. Naturally, hashing the number might produce longer values for the hash than the actual number is, in which case you might simply directly make the mobile number unique.

I hope this helps a bit in your decision on what to do.

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  • I suppose the '$$' delimiter needed to be after "END".
    – Bipul Roy
    Feb 8, 2020 at 10:52
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Too many things for a comment...

If you already have INDEX(email), then simply turn it into UNIQUE(email). The table (data+index) size will not change (more than a little due to the ALTER).

If email is too big to index -- such as because it is TEXT -- then there is no way to add a UNIQUE index on email. In this case, the "hash" solution would work. Yes it would add megabytes to the disk usage, but this is unlikely to be an issue.

If you currently have id AUTO_INCREMENT and PRIMARY KEY(id), then do you actually use id in other tables? If not, then there are other paths we can discuss, such as making email or hash the PRIMARY KEY. This might even shrink the disk footprint.

Regardless of what you do, use InnoDB.

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  • How about this if don't store the hash of email id's rather just declare emai_id as a primary key and not null, will it do it for me? But primary key itself is a unique clustered index which could be a problem for me.
    – Deep
    Apr 28, 2017 at 8:21
  • With PRIMARY KEY(email), INSERTing the same email again will fail (duplicate key). See also INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE....
    – Rick James
    Apr 28, 2017 at 18:39
-1

If you're doing a unique key lookup it really doesn't make enough performance difference to worry about if the index is clustered or not. It might make sense (or not) to cluster it as you add more things to the table. The main thing is that you have a unique constraint and most likely this will be the primary key so you'll get that and a corresponding index. Performance will be fine - concern yourself with the other uses. e.g. if you want to do an analysis on domain you might need to decompose the email address. That might be more important. Like most things, it depends....

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  • Thanks for your help. But I want to clear one more thing. I have a separate ID column which I have declared as Primary Key but rather I am thinking to declare emailID as a primary key and Auto inc. as I have already declared it Unique. It will certainly reduce the size of my database if I have millions of record in it. Please do correct me If I am wrong. Thanks.. :)
    – Deep
    Apr 25, 2017 at 8:38
  • @Deep - what is emailID? The value of email address? How do you plan to make that auto incremented? Just leave primary key as is, add the hash of the email as unique so you don't get duplicates and all your problems are gone. You can query fast, you can retrieve fast, you can insert only unique emails - don't overthink it because you'll find problems where there are none. Millions of records is nothing, so don't worry too much about millions of records.
    – Mjh
    Apr 25, 2017 at 10:06
  • You don't need an ID for this. Even if you do decide to include it, you need to put a unique, not null constraint on email which is effectively the PK. If you need a foreign key on email then maybe keep the ID but that's outside the scope of what you've described here. Not sure why Mjh is so insistent about hashing the email - not necessary, complicates everything and leaves the door open for errors. I'd not do that. Apr 25, 2017 at 11:01
  • @LoztInSpace - I'm not insistent, the standard way to approach the problem with unique variable input is to calculate a number representing that input - a hash. Using MySQL + InnoDB, and having a natural instead of surrogate primary key produces something unwanted - a hidden clustering key will be created, and it will be 8 bytes in length. So, by "hunting" for optimization, you'll actually inflate the index storage instead of deflate it. I'll leave the topic, there's no need to insist or enforce a solution on someone who wants to hear something else. Good luck guys and have a nice day!
    – Mjh
    Apr 25, 2017 at 11:06
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Hashing an Email Address Column in the Database for indexing can be achieved by altering DB to add a new field (email_hash) :

ALTER TABLE user_meta ADD email_hash VARBINARY(32) NULL

Then set the value of the email_hash by:

UPDATE user_meta SET email_hash = MD5(email);

And then create a trigger like described , for example:

DELIMITER $$
CREATE TRIGGER users_meta_before_insert BEFORE INSERT ON 'user_meta'
FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
SET NEW.email_hash = MD5(email); -- You can remove UNHEX if you want human-readable value. You'll need binary(40) to hold it then
END;
DELIMITER ;

Also you may find this useful: https://www.koder.ly/2020/07/hashing-an-email-address/

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