2

I am using this piece of code to get the initials of the person's full name:

var name = "John Smith"; // for an example
var initials = name.match(/\b\w/g) || [];
initials = ((initials.shift() || '') + (initials.pop() || '')).toUpperCase();
// initials then returns "JS"

Now I need my initials to return the first letter of the first name and three letters of the last name ("JSMI" in the example above).

What should I alter in my regex in order to do that?

Also, if person would have two names (for example "John Michael Smith"), I need to get "JMSMI" as a result...

Any other solutions are welcome!

  • what if last name is less than 3 letters? – tsh Apr 25 '17 at 8:07
  • @tsh I'm pretty sure there won't be any in my case, but ideally it should return the full last name then (1 or 2 letters) – Gintas K Apr 25 '17 at 8:09
  • "John Michael Smith" has three names, not two. – user663031 Apr 25 '17 at 8:10
  • @torazaburo I meant two first names :) – Gintas K Apr 25 '17 at 8:11
  • Try var res = name.match(/\b\w{1,3}(?=\w*$)|\b\w/g).map(x => x.toUpperCase()).join(""); – Wiktor Stribiżew Apr 25 '17 at 8:11
2

You may add a \b\w{1,3}(?=\w*$) alternative to your existing regex at the start to match 1 to 3 words chars in the last word of the string.

var name = "John Michael Smith"; //John Smith" => JSMI
var res = name.match(/\b\w{1,3}(?=\w*$)|\b\w/g).map(function (x) {return x.toUpperCase()}).join("");
console.log(res);

See the regex demo.

Regex details:

  • \b - a leading word boundary
  • \w{1,3} - 1 to 3 word chars (ASCII letters, digits or _)
  • (?=\w*$) - a positive lookahead requiring 0+ word chars followed with the end of string position
  • | - or
  • \b\w - a word char at the start of a word.

I tried to avoid capturing groups (and used the positive lookahead) to make the JS code necessary to post-process the results shorter.

3

Try with Array#split() , substring() and Array#map

  1. first you need split the string with space.
  2. And get the single letter array[n-1] using sustring,
  3. Then get the 3 letter on final argument of array
  4. Map function iterate each word of your string

function reduce(a){
var c= a.split(" ");
var res = c.map((a,b) => b < c.length-1 ? a.substring(0,1) : a.substring(0,3))
return res.join("").toUpperCase()
}

console.log(reduce('John Michael Smith'))
console.log(reduce('John Smith'))

2

Use split() and substr() to easily do this.

EDIT

Updated code to reflect the middle initial etc

function get_initials(name) {
  var parts = name.split(" ");

  var initials = "";
  for (var i = 0; i < parts.length; i++) {
    if (i < (parts.length - 1)) {
      initials += parts[i].substr(0, 1);
    } else {
      initials += parts[i].substr(0, 3);
    }
  }
  return initials.toUpperCase();

}

console.log(get_initials("John Michael Smith"));

  • Thanks Mike, I'm familiar with javascript, so I know I can write a function like this, but I also need to check if person has multiple first names, also if the last name is at least 3 characters long, so I would end up with a pretty big function :) This is a regex question, just to see if it can do it in one line :) Thanks anyway! +1 – Gintas K Apr 25 '17 at 8:20
  • @GintasK not really that complex -- and you can write out the code like this at first, then use that to model your regex expression ;) – mike510a Apr 25 '17 at 8:23
  • @GintasK what if they only have one name? Or they have a name like Jon David Robert Thomas, then the regex may not work.. – mike510a Apr 25 '17 at 8:25
  • Just tested @WiktorStribiżew 's regex and it works for any number of names – Gintas K Apr 25 '17 at 8:29
  • @GintasK try this name: "John Worthington, Jr." – mike510a Apr 25 '17 at 8:30
1

My two cents with a reducer :)

function initials(name) {
  return name.split(' ').reduce(function(acc, item, index, array) {
    var chars = index === array.length - 1 ? 3 : 1;
    acc += item.substr(0, chars).toUpperCase();
    return acc;
  }, '')
}

console.log(initials('John'));
console.log(initials('John Michael'));
console.log(initials('John Michael Smith'));

  • Your reducer seems to be nothing more than an awkward way to do join. – user663031 Apr 25 '17 at 8:56
1

You may want use String.prototype.replace to drop following letters:

This regexp will match first 1 (or 3 for last name) letters in a word, and only keep it.

'John Smith'.replace(/(?:(\w)\w*\s+)|(?:(\w{3})\w*$)/g, '$1$2').toUpperCase()
0

const name = "John Michael Smith";

const initials = name.toUpperCase().split(/\s+/)
  .map((x, i, arr) => x.substr(0, i === arr.length - 1 ? 3 : 1))
  .join('');

console.log(initials);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.