1

I am trying to test my lambda function locally, using mocha, chai and chai-as-promised where async is concerned. My lambda uses the AWS context.succeed format to return the result, not the callback, and I need to keep it that way. I have one test below, which returns a status code of 200, but when I expect it to be 400, it still passes the test (false positive). Any logs placed in the custom context succeed function, is not shown, indicating it is not getting hit, or I my understanding of how context.succeed works is a little off. Any pointers would be much appreciated.

Note - The lambda works just fine, the test is all I have an issue with.

Here is the simple code I have so far. Basically, I call my lambda function, pass in an event and context as expected. When context.succeed is called, it should test the result passed into context.

'use strict';
const myHandler = require('../lambdaHandler');
const chai = require('chai');
const expect = chai.expect;
const chaiAsPromised = require('chai-as-promised');
chai.use(chaiAsPromised);

describe('myHandler.handler should return with expected statusCodes', () => {

it('should return a 200 statusCode', () => {
  myHandler.handler(event, {
    succeed : (data) => {
      expect(data).to.eventually.have.property('statusCode');
      expect(data.statusCode).to.eventually.equal(400);
    },
    fail : (data) => {
      expect(data).to.have.property('statusCode');
    },
  });
});


});
  • seems like an async issue. add done as a function arg in your it-block callback. call done() after your expect statements or done(data.statusCode) in your fail handler – LostJon Apr 25 '17 at 16:47
  • It is definitely an async issue, but thats why I was using chai-as-promised. Neither the succeed or fail are getting hit so placing done would not have any impact. I ended up getting my tests working as expected by using 'lambda-tester' instead. Only down side is, only Node version 4.3.2 is supported. – johnny_mac Apr 26 '17 at 22:24
  • instead of using chai-as-promised, i usually just pass done into the callback. the code tends to become a bit longer, but it feels more natural – LostJon Apr 27 '17 at 14:18
  • @LostJon I do that too, but it is not seen in my code above as it did not solve the issue. – johnny_mac Apr 28 '17 at 14:30
  • ill add an answer of how i think it should work, obviously untested...but still may be helpful – LostJon Apr 28 '17 at 15:33
1

I would suggest you read this article:

https://blog.atomdata.io/serverless-applications-continuous-delivery-with-aws-lambda-and-api-gateway-part-1-unit-tests-e517aa1cd09e

Which explains how these guys are unit testing their lambda's.

  • Thanks, that is a great article, but does not really solve the issue at hand, which is essentially figuring out why my current implementation does not work. I have other tests going using lambda-tester etc, so using serverless would be a similar approach I think. The problem is that I am exporting this handler function and using context.succeed, which never gets hit. Basically, a simple node async function to be unit tested but is not playing well. – johnny_mac May 1 '17 at 18:44
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Here is what I would do:

'use strict';
const myHandler = require('../lambdaHandler');
const chai = require('chai');
const expect = chai.expect;
const chaiAsPromised = require('chai-as-promised');
chai.use(chaiAsPromised);

describe('myHandler.handler should return with expected statusCodes', () => {

it('should return a 200 statusCode', (done) => {
  try{ 
  myHandler.handler(event, {
    succeed : (data) => {
      expect(data).to.eventually.have.property('statusCode');
      expect(data.statusCode).to.eventually.equal(400);
      done();
    },
    fail : (data) => {
      expect(data).to.have.property('statusCode');
      done();
    },
  });
  } catch(err){
    done(err.message);
  }
});


});
  • Please bear with me on formatting....also, the try-catch should be removed once you get this working. From a test-dev perspective, sometimes the error handling helps when you are in an unknown blackhole... – LostJon Apr 28 '17 at 15:37
0

I ended up going with lambda-tester: https://github.com/vandium-io/lambda-tester. The only downside is that it does not support Node version > 4.3.2

  • 1
    As of June, 2018 the project notes "Version 3 targets Lambda handlers using Node 6.10 and 8.10. If you require support for Node 4.x, please use version 2.x" – Michael Paulukonis Jun 4 '18 at 19:13
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Here is an example of what I did using lambda-local and jest for testing a function that get data from DynamoDB (local):

const lambdaLocal = require('lambda-local');
const AWS = require('aws-sdk');
const options = {
  region: 'localhost',
  endpoint: 'http://localhost:8000'
}
AWS.config.update(options);
const lambda = require('./index');

describe('Item', () => {
  it('returns a list of items', (done) => {
    lambdaLocal.execute({
      event: {},
      lambdaFunc: lambda,
      lambdaHandler: 'handle',
      profilePath: '~/.aws/credentials',
      profileName: 'default',
      timeoutMs: 3000,
      callback: function(error, data) {
        expect(error).toBeFalsy();
        expect(data).toBeTruthy();
        expect(data.Count).toEqual(5);
        expect(data.Items[0].name).toEqual('Item name');
        // ...
        done();
      }
    });
  });
});

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