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I'm using Core Data in combination with mogenerator to manage a rather large and heavily linked data object graph.

Due to some unlucky design decisions in the past (storing data as Transformable in an object), I'm running into memory problems when performing migration; migration is difficult enough so that lightweight doesn't cover it, and custom migration tries to load everything in memory and fails miserably.

Based on the excellent Core Data book by Marcus Zarra, I've adapted his progressive migration approach to be able to mix-and-match successive migration passes according to a lightweight, custom or 'writing your own' migration strategy. I'm using this to create an intermediate data model in which I load my 'big data' object and write it out to an external file on disk, and just keep the url to that file instead.

Basically, this looks like this:

     v1   ----(lightweight)---------->  v1.5   --(lightweight)-->   v2
                         |                             |
* myData: Transformable  |  * myData: Transformable?   | * myDataUrl: String
                         |  * myDataUrl: String        |

In between the two lightweight migrations, I hook up a NSPersistentStoreController to the intermediate model, fetch objects which need to be changed using fetchLimit, fetchBatchSize; write the data away to a file on disk and nullify the data stored in the object itself, during which I regularly save of the moc and fault the processed objects.

This works rather nicely.. but... there's another part of the migration not working very well, where I've removed a relationship and replaced it with a computed property in the 'Human' class of the mogenerated file., i.e.

     v1   ----(lightweight)---------->  v1.5   --(lightweight)-->   v2
                              |                             |
* myRel ->> [Some object]     | * myRel ->> [Some object]?  |  (nothing stored here)
                                                               computed property `myRel` in the `MyEntity` human class

Along the same principles, in the 'v1.5-to-v1.5' pass, I'm moving the information stored in myRel to a different level and trying to set the relationship to nil afterwards. The app using the datamodel v2 an still access the objects referred to in myRel using the same interface, because I've added it as a computed property which retrieves the moved data.

public var myRel: [Some object] { return ... }

Here's the code that does this move:

// Note that since I'm not working on the current data model version in this
// so-called migration pass, I cannot/should not refer to the real `MyEntity` class that
// mogenerator generates for me. 
let fetchRequest = NSFetchRequest<NSManagedObject>(entityName: "MyEntity")

let objects = try? moc.fetch(fetchRequest)
objects.forEach { object in
    // Process objects in `myRel` and move them to a different level
    let toProcess = ($0.value(forKey: "myRel") as? NSOrderedSet)?.array as? [NSManagedObject]?

    // ... process ...

    // Now nullify the original relationship
    $0.setValue(nil, forKey: "myRel")
}

This last line causes a runtime crash, showing a stacktrace that leads into the "Object" file mogenerator generated for the final model version, not for this intermediate model

#0  0x0000000100f6885e in MyEntity.myRel.getter at ...
#1  0x0000000100f68732 in @objc MyEntity.myRel.getter ()
#2  0x000000010ebf7db7 in _PF_Handler_Public_GetProperty ()
#3  0x000000010124f221 in NSKeyValueWillChangeBySetting ()
#4  0x0000000101249798 in NSKeyValueWillChange ()
#5  0x000000010121f618 in -[NSObject(NSKeyValueObserverNotification) willChangeValueForKey:] ()
#6  0x0000000100f47222 in NSManagedObject.setValue<A where ...> (Any?, for : A) -> () at ...

Naturally this crashes because the datamodel on which I'm working does not contain the entities referred to in my computed property myRel(those are only present on datamodel v2)

This surprises me, I constructed the NSFetchRequest especially with <NSManagedObject> in hopes of having 'sliced away' the underlying dynamic logic of the MyEntity class, but it seems Core Data/Swift infers the runtime type based on the entity name/description. Is there any way to circumvent this?

I also tried using setPrimitiveValue, but that causes my moc to miss changes I make the changes I make to my objects are not saved that way.

  • Writing this all down helped to see the light somewhat. I managed to work around the problem by renaming myRel in the intermediate data model to myRelOld and accessing that one in the intermediate transform. Since the relationship is removed in the migration to data model v2 this doesn't matter so much. Still, if anyone can give me a pointer on why Core Data is trying to use the 'current datamodel' entity instead of the intermediate one; note that my computed property in the newest model is not marked @dynamic/@NSManaged; or just show a fresh light on what I'm doing, always welcome! – Stavr0s Apr 26 '17 at 5:44
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Writing this all down helped to see the light somewhat. I managed to work around the problem by renaming myRel in the intermediate data model to myRelOld and accessing that one in the intermediate transform. Since the relationship is removed in the migration to data model v2 this doesn't matter so much.

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