6

Using Node.js version 7.7.2, I'd like to define and export an ES6 class from a module like this:

// Foo.js
class Foo {
    construct() {
        this.bar = 'bar';
    }
}
module.exports = Foo;

And then import the class into another module and construct an instance of said class like this:

// Bar.js
require('./foo');
var foo = new Foo();
var fooBar = foo.bar;

However, this syntax does not work. Is what I am trying to do possible, and if so, what is the correct syntax to achieve this?

Thanks.

3
  • Do you know how do use modules in pre-ES6 nodejs?
    – Bergi
    Apr 25, 2017 at 21:21
  • The obvious problem here is that you set the property foo but look for the property bar... Apr 25, 2017 at 21:47
  • Yup, that was a typo. Just fixed it. Good catch. Status Report: Currently working on an implementation of this, will be back soon with results.
    – Allen More
    Apr 25, 2017 at 22:01

2 Answers 2

8

You have to use regular node module syntax for this.

You have a few mistakes in your sample code. First, the class should not be followed by (). Also, a class constructor should be constructor not construct. Look at the below foo.js for proper syntax.

foo.js

class Foo {
  constructor () {
    this.foo = 'bar';
  }
}

module.exports = Foo;

bar.js

const Foo = require('./foo');

const foo = new Foo();

console.log(foo.foo); // => bar
3
  • You're right, the parens were a typo which is now fixed. The syntax you posted does not work. foo.foo ends up being undefined and "type of foo" resolves to type 'object' instead of type 'Foo'. Am I missing something? Edit: Interestingly, console.log(require('./Foo')) prints the class definition, so it is getting exported/imported. Problem is 'new Foo()' is not calling the constructor.
    – Allen More
    Apr 25, 2017 at 23:22
  • You must be doing something incorrectly, I actually made a test project with exactly those two files. The reason foo.foo works is because the class Foo has a property foo. Depending on the instance name of that class (in this case foo) it will be come foo.foo. You could do: const x = new Foo() and then call x.foo which will be bar. Hope that helps. Apr 25, 2017 at 23:32
  • I retract the above. This is the correct syntax. I was just spelling constructor wrong. I am awash in an ocean of shame.
    – Allen More
    Apr 25, 2017 at 23:33
-1
// Foo.js
export class Foo() {
    construct() {
        this.foo = 'bar';
    }
}

notice keyword EXPORT

5
  • How would the corresponding input look like?
    – Bergi
    Apr 25, 2017 at 21:21
  • I'm not sure what you mean by "corresponding input" Apr 25, 2017 at 21:40
  • Oops, I mean to write import. import, not input.
    – Bergi
    Apr 25, 2017 at 21:43
  • 1
    This answer is incorrect: the asker is running node.js which does not currently support es6 modules without transpilation. Also, you syntax is incorrect, the class declaration should not be followed by parentheses and the constructor method must be constructor (assuming that a constructor was intended). Apr 25, 2017 at 22:04
  • so true! I just saw importing problem and snapped to "export". My bad on the syntaxis I just copy-pasted from the original question without actually reading the whole code :( Apr 26, 2017 at 2:03

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