152

To get stuck in straight away, a very basic example:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

class test
{ 
    static void Main()
    { 
        Console.WriteLine("test");
        MessageBox.Show("test");
    }
}

If I compile this with default options (using csc at command line), as expected, it will compile to a console application. Also, because I imported System.Windows.Forms, it will also show a message box.

Now, if I use the option /target:winexe, which I think is the same as choosing Windows Application from within project options, as expected I will only see the Message Box and no console output.

(In fact, the moment it is launched from command line, I can issue the next command before the application has even completed).

So, my question is - I know that you can have "windows"/forms output from a console application, but is there anyway to show the console from a Windows application?

3
  • 2
    what do you see as the difference between the two? Why not just compile as console and show a form.
    – Doggett
    Dec 6 '10 at 0:05
  • 8
    @Doggett, simple - I am learning and want to understand why/how to do it, even if I never end up using it in a real application.... At the moment, I am thinking of an option that gives extra commands/output such as in VLC, however TBH, I do not need it - again, just learning and want to understand it!
    – Wil
    Dec 6 '10 at 1:24
  • 1
    I accomplished that using this tutorial: saezndaree.wordpress.com/2009/03/29/…
    – vivanov
    Dec 24 '16 at 16:04

13 Answers 13

177

this one should work.

using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    AllocConsole();
}

[DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
[return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
static extern bool AllocConsole();
7
  • 8
    Awesome, this question seems to have been asked a lot, this is the only actual answer to the question I've been able to find, +1
    – RobJohnson
    Jul 5 '13 at 13:13
  • 6
    Main problem : when you close it, all application closes.
    – Mark
    Aug 26 '13 at 8:53
  • 5
    I tested on Windows 8 and Windows 10: - AttachConsole works from a cmd box - AllocConsole works from Visual Studio. When alloc is needed, AttachConsole returns false. You should also call FreeConsole() before terminating the application in console mode. In my program I used Matthew Strawbridge's code (see below), with the AttachConsole() line modified to: if (!AttachConsole(-1)) AllocConsole(); Sep 17 '15 at 10:42
  • 4
    This is not great, when run from the command line it pops open a separate console window, and when running from the command line and trying to use > to redirect the output I get a separate console window and zero output in my file.
    – uglycoyote
    Aug 14 '18 at 22:40
  • 1
    How to print messages in this console? Console.Writeline() is not printing anything in the console.
    – Sid133
    Jun 16 at 4:29
162

Perhaps this is over-simplistic...

Create a Windows Form project...

Then: Project Properties -> Application -> Output Type -> Console Application

Then can have Console and Forms running together, works for me

10
  • 2
    Seems simplest, fixed my issue as well.
    – dadude999
    Jan 29 '15 at 19:11
  • 2
    This is definitely the best solution! Others are smarts but way complicated
    – LM.Croisez
    Mar 12 '15 at 15:20
  • 3
    Simple and worked fine. This should be the accepted answer.
    – madu
    Apr 6 '17 at 1:07
  • 9
    While, yes, technically this can be used to allow what the poster is asking for - it is not a great solution. By doing this, if you then start your winforms application with the GUI - you will also get a console window opened. In this case, you would need something more like Mike de Klerk's answer. Apr 6 '17 at 3:24
  • 2
    This is the only solution where I have been able to get my Winforms app to write output to the console when run from the command line, or to write to file when redirected on command line with >. However, I was hoping for a solution that that would explain how to run as a "Console Application" only some of the time (i.e. to programmatically enable whatever it is that changing this mysterious Visual Studio setting does). Does anyone know how this works under the hood?
    – uglycoyote
    Aug 14 '18 at 22:45
76

If you are not worrying about opening a console on-command, you can go into the properties for your project and change it to Console Application

screenshot of changing the project type.

This will still show your form as well as popping up a console window. You can't close the console window, but it works as an excellent temporary logger for debugging.

Just remember to turn it back off before you deploy the program.

8
  • 1
    Nice. This resolves the problem I have with my forms application, that I need to be able to output to a console window while supporting redirecting the output to a file. And I dont need to attach any console manually... Jun 24 '14 at 9:31
  • 3
    @JasonHarrison If you close the console window, the program closes. Also the window is always open while the program runs.
    – gunr2171
    Mar 24 '16 at 22:08
  • 2
    @gun2171: Thanks. The downsides to this approach is noted in the answer: the console window will appear if the application is launched with double click, Start menu, etc. Mar 24 '16 at 22:14
  • Any way to track that console close event?
    – Elshan
    Aug 8 '20 at 22:41
  • I followed this and the console still didnt show
    – West
    Mar 10 at 10:43
20

You can call AttachConsole using pinvoke to get a console window attached to a WinForms project: http://www.csharp411.com/console-output-from-winforms-application/

You may also want to consider Log4net ( http://logging.apache.org/log4net/index.html ) for configuring log output in different configurations.

2
  • +1 - Wow, I was hoping for a console.show or similar! a lot more complicated than I thought! I will leave open for the moment just in case there is a better / easier answer.
    – Wil
    Dec 6 '10 at 1:27
  • This worked for me, AllocConsole() did not because it spawned a new console window (did not dig further into AllocConsole, maybe I missed something there though).
    – derFunk
    Feb 7 '13 at 8:21
14

This worked for me, to pipe the output to a file. Call the console with

cmd /c "C:\path\to\your\application.exe" > myfile.txt

Add this code to your application.

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    static extern bool AttachConsole(UInt32 dwProcessId);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern bool GetFileInformationByHandle(
        SafeFileHandle hFile,
        out BY_HANDLE_FILE_INFORMATION lpFileInformation
        );
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern SafeFileHandle GetStdHandle(UInt32 nStdHandle);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern bool SetStdHandle(UInt32 nStdHandle, SafeFileHandle hHandle);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern bool DuplicateHandle(
        IntPtr hSourceProcessHandle,
        SafeFileHandle hSourceHandle,
        IntPtr hTargetProcessHandle,
        out SafeFileHandle lpTargetHandle,
        UInt32 dwDesiredAccess,
        Boolean bInheritHandle,
        UInt32 dwOptions
        );
    private const UInt32 ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS = 0xFFFFFFFF;
    private const UInt32 STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE = 0xFFFFFFF5;
    private const UInt32 STD_ERROR_HANDLE = 0xFFFFFFF4;
    private const UInt32 DUPLICATE_SAME_ACCESS = 2;
    struct BY_HANDLE_FILE_INFORMATION
    {
        public UInt32 FileAttributes;
        public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME CreationTime;
        public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME LastAccessTime;
        public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME LastWriteTime;
        public UInt32 VolumeSerialNumber;
        public UInt32 FileSizeHigh;
        public UInt32 FileSizeLow;
        public UInt32 NumberOfLinks;
        public UInt32 FileIndexHigh;
        public UInt32 FileIndexLow;
    }
    static void InitConsoleHandles()
    {
        SafeFileHandle hStdOut, hStdErr, hStdOutDup, hStdErrDup;
        BY_HANDLE_FILE_INFORMATION bhfi;
        hStdOut = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
        hStdErr = GetStdHandle(STD_ERROR_HANDLE);
        // Get current process handle
        IntPtr hProcess = Process.GetCurrentProcess().Handle;
        // Duplicate Stdout handle to save initial value
        DuplicateHandle(hProcess, hStdOut, hProcess, out hStdOutDup,
        0, true, DUPLICATE_SAME_ACCESS);
        // Duplicate Stderr handle to save initial value
        DuplicateHandle(hProcess, hStdErr, hProcess, out hStdErrDup,
        0, true, DUPLICATE_SAME_ACCESS);
        // Attach to console window – this may modify the standard handles
        AttachConsole(ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS);
        // Adjust the standard handles
        if (GetFileInformationByHandle(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), out bhfi))
        {
            SetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE, hStdOutDup);
        }
        else
        {
            SetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE, hStdOut);
        }
        if (GetFileInformationByHandle(GetStdHandle(STD_ERROR_HANDLE), out bhfi))
        {
            SetStdHandle(STD_ERROR_HANDLE, hStdErrDup);
        }
        else
        {
            SetStdHandle(STD_ERROR_HANDLE, hStdErr);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // initialize console handles
        InitConsoleHandles();

        if (args.Length != 0)
        {

            if (args[0].Equals("waitfordebugger"))
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Attach the debugger now");
            }
            if (args[0].Equals("version"))
            {
#if DEBUG
                String typeOfBuild = "d";
#else
                String typeOfBuild = "r";
#endif
                String output = typeOfBuild + Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()
                    .GetName().Version.ToString();
                //Just for the fun of it
                Console.Write(output);
                Console.Beep(4000, 100);
                Console.Beep(2000, 100);
                Console.Beep(1000, 100);
                Console.Beep(8000, 100);
                return;
            }
        }
    }

I found this code here: http://www.csharp411.com/console-output-from-winforms-application/ I thought is was worthy to post it here as well.

3
  • 5
    This works great EXCEPT it now fails in Windows 8 and Windows 10. By fails I mean there's no output except and extra prompt (if that's a clue).Someone suggested AllocConsole but that just flashed a cmd window. Jun 22 '15 at 16:04
  • Also tried Chaz's answer above but that gives a new console in Windows 7 (lathough not in 8 or 10). I just need the option to run with redirection on the command line or run as a gui if there are no args. Jun 24 '15 at 9:58
  • I tried this but did not work. With just AttachConsole(ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS) I get the console output but redirecting it on the command line with > does not work. When I try this answer, I can't get any output whatsoever, either in the console or in a file.
    – uglycoyote
    Aug 14 '18 at 22:37
13

Create a Windows Forms Application, and change the output type to Console.

It will result in both a console and the form to open.

enter image description here

2
  • 1
    This is exactly what I am looking for. Simple and not using WINAPI's. Aug 15 '19 at 10:52
  • 1
    I have tried many examples, but none of them produced results that fulfilled my expectations. This solution however is exactly what I wanted and by far the easiest solution.
    – inexcitus
    Sep 17 '19 at 5:01
11

There are basically two things that can happen here.

Console output It is possible for a winforms program to attach itself to the console window that created it (or to a different console window, or indeed to a new console window if desired). Once attached to the console window Console.WriteLine() etc works as expected. One gotcha to this approach is that the program returns control to the console window immediately, and then carries on writing to it, so the user can also type away in the console window. You can use start with the /wait parameter to handle this I think.

Link to start Command syntax

Redirected console output This is when someone pipes the output from your program somewhere else, eg.

yourapp > file.txt

Attaching to a console window in this case effectively ignores the piping. To make this work you can call Console.OpenStandardOutput() to get a handle to the stream that the output should be piped to. This only works if the output is piped, so if you want to handle both of the scenarios you need to open the standard output and write to it and attach to the console window. This does mean that the output is sent to the console window and to the pipe but its the best solution I could find. Below the code I use to do this.

// This always writes to the parent console window and also to a redirected stdout if there is one.
// It would be better to do the relevant thing (eg write to the redirected file if there is one, otherwise
// write to the console) but it doesn't seem possible.
public class GUIConsoleWriter : IConsoleWriter
{
    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern bool AttachConsole(int dwProcessId);

    private const int ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS = -1;

    StreamWriter _stdOutWriter;

    // this must be called early in the program
    public GUIConsoleWriter()
    {
        // this needs to happen before attachconsole.
        // If the output is not redirected we still get a valid stream but it doesn't appear to write anywhere
        // I guess it probably does write somewhere, but nowhere I can find out about
        var stdout = Console.OpenStandardOutput();
        _stdOutWriter = new StreamWriter(stdout);
        _stdOutWriter.AutoFlush = true;

        AttachConsole(ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS);
    }

    public void WriteLine(string line)
    {
        _stdOutWriter.WriteLine(line);
        Console.WriteLine(line);
    }
}
5
  • I wasn't able to write to the console; attaching the parent process first did the trick. Thank you.
    – Pupper
    Jun 4 '13 at 20:52
  • It would seem this answer requires you to rewrite all calls to Console.WriteLine to instead call the new WriteLine defined above. Even though I tried that I was unable with this code to get anything redirected to a file when running the application on the command line and redirecting with > to a file.
    – uglycoyote
    Aug 14 '18 at 22:48
  • @uglycoyote, make sure you are constructing the GUIConsoleWriter as early as possible in your application, otherwise it won't work for mysterious windows type reasons. I would argue that encapsulating calls to Console.WriteLine is just good practice, as it allows you to test, and to easily change the places that you log to (for example, you might want to start logging to a cloud based logging service like PaperTrail, or whatever)
    – cedd
    Aug 15 '18 at 8:12
  • this worked fine for me in Win10 without even StreamWriter _stdOutWriter;
    – T.S.
    Nov 2 '18 at 5:05
  • Piping is the answer, but instead of to a file, just use MORE, like: yourapp | more ; please refer to stackoverflow.com/a/13010823/1845672
    – Roland
    Jun 9 '20 at 13:59
6
//From your application set the Console to write to your RichTextkBox 
//object:
Console.SetOut(new RichTextBoxWriter(yourRichTextBox));

//To ensure that your RichTextBox object is scrolled down when its text is 
//changed add this event:
private void yourRichTextBox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    yourRichTextBox.SelectionStart = yourRichTextBox.Text.Length;
    yourRichTextBox.ScrollToCaret();
}

public delegate void StringArgReturningVoidDelegate(string text);
public class RichTextBoxWriter : TextWriter
{
    private readonly RichTextBox _richTextBox;
    public RichTextBoxWriter(RichTextBox richTexttbox)
    {
        _richTextBox = richTexttbox;
    }

    public override void Write(char value)
    {
        SetText(value.ToString());
    }

    public override void Write(string value)
    {
        SetText(value);
    }

    public override void WriteLine(char value)
    {
        SetText(value + Environment.NewLine);
    }

    public override void WriteLine(string value)
    {
        SetText(value + Environment.NewLine);
    }

    public override Encoding Encoding => Encoding.ASCII;

    //Write to your UI object in thread safe way:
    private void SetText(string text)
    {
        // InvokeRequired required compares the thread ID of the  
        // calling thread to the thread ID of the creating thread.  
        // If these threads are different, it returns true.  
        if (_richTextBox.InvokeRequired)
        {
            var d = new StringArgReturningVoidDelegate(SetText);
            _richTextBox.Invoke(d, text);
        }
        else
        {
            _richTextBox.Text += text;
        }
    }
}
1
  • Very cool Solution. Exactly what I wanted!
    – BenHero
    Aug 26 at 8:55
5

Building on Chaz's answer, in .NET 5 there is a breaking change, so two modifications are required in the project file, i.e. changing OutputType and adding DisableWinExeOutputInference. Example:

<PropertyGroup>
    <OutputType>Exe</OutputType>
    <TargetFramework>net5.0-windows10.0.17763.0</TargetFramework>
    <UseWindowsForms>true</UseWindowsForms>
    <DisableWinExeOutputInference>true</DisableWinExeOutputInference>
    <Platforms>AnyCPU;x64;x86</Platforms>
</PropertyGroup>
3
using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace SomeProject
{
    class GuiRedirect
    {
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern bool AttachConsole(int dwProcessId);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern IntPtr GetStdHandle(StandardHandle nStdHandle);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern bool SetStdHandle(StandardHandle nStdHandle, IntPtr handle);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern FileType GetFileType(IntPtr handle);

    private enum StandardHandle : uint
    {
        Input = unchecked((uint)-10),
        Output = unchecked((uint)-11),
        Error = unchecked((uint)-12)
    }

    private enum FileType : uint
    {
        Unknown = 0x0000,
        Disk = 0x0001,
        Char = 0x0002,
        Pipe = 0x0003
    }

    private static bool IsRedirected(IntPtr handle)
    {
        FileType fileType = GetFileType(handle);

        return (fileType == FileType.Disk) || (fileType == FileType.Pipe);
    }

    public static void Redirect()
    {
        if (IsRedirected(GetStdHandle(StandardHandle.Output)))
        {
            var initialiseOut = Console.Out;
        }

        bool errorRedirected = IsRedirected(GetStdHandle(StandardHandle.Error));
        if (errorRedirected)
        {
            var initialiseError = Console.Error;
        }

        AttachConsole(-1);

        if (!errorRedirected)
            SetStdHandle(StandardHandle.Error, GetStdHandle(StandardHandle.Output));
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Works fine from a command prompt, but not from Start > Run or in Visual Studio. To make it work in all cases, replace the AttachConsole line by: if (!AttachConsole(-1)) AllocConsole(); If AllocConsole() is called, FreeConsole() should also be called, else the console host continues running after terminating the program. Sep 17 '15 at 10:44
  • 2
    What is the intended use of initialiseOut and initialiseError, because they are not used?
    – Edwin
    Feb 20 '16 at 10:56
  • 1
    StandardHandle : uint is wrong here... should be IntPtr to work both on x86 and x64 Mar 8 '18 at 20:39
0

Why not just leave it as a Window Forms app, and create a simple form to mimic the Console. The form can be made to look just like the black-screened Console, and have it respond directly to key press. Then, in the program.cs file, you decide whether you need to Run the main form or the ConsoleForm. For example, I use this approach to capture the command line arguments in the program.cs file. I create the ConsoleForm, initially hide it, then pass the command line strings to an AddCommand function in it, which displays the allowed commands. Finally, if the user gave the -h or -? command, I call the .Show on the ConsoleForm and when the user hits any key on it, I shut down the program. If the user doesn't give the -? command, I close the hidden ConsoleForm and Run the main form.

1
  • 1
    i'm not sure this counts as a question. He gives a complete step-by-step of how to do what he's suggesting, even if actual code would be nice.
    – John Lord
    Aug 14 '20 at 16:18
0

Setting the output type as Console in the project properties will give you a Console application along with the form you created.

-2

You can any time switch between type of applications, to console or windows. So, you will not write special logic to see the stdout. Also, when running application in debugger, you will see all the stdout in output window. You might also just add a breakpoint, and in breakpoint properties change "When Hit...", you can output any messages, and variables. Also you can check/uncheck "Continue execution", and your breakpoint will become square shaped. So, the breakpoint messages without changhing anything in the application in the debug output window.

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