332

I have a list of numbers such as [1,2,3,4,5...], and I want to calculate (1+2)/2 and for the second, (2+3)/2 and the third, (3+4)/2, and so on. How can I do that?

I would like to sum the first number with the second and divide it by 2, then sum the second with the third and divide by 2, and so on.

Also, how can I sum a list of numbers?

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...]

Is it:

b = sum(a)
print b

to get one number?

This doesn't work for me.

  • How long is this list? how random are the values, between 0 and 1? – kevpie Dec 6 '10 at 8:04
  • 1
    if you define sum before it could mess python, try del sum . maybe it has been defined in the code somewhere and overwrites the default function. So I deleted it and the problem was solved. (answer by user4183543) – NicoKowe Feb 6 at 1:31

22 Answers 22

256

Question 1: So you want (element 0 + element 1) / 2, (element 1 + element 2) / 2, ... etc.

We make two lists: one of every element except the first, and one of every element except the last. Then the averages we want are the averages of each pair taken from the two lists. We use zip to take pairs from two lists.

I assume you want to see decimals in the result, even though your input values are integers. By default, Python does integer division: it discards the remainder. To divide things through all the way, we need to use floating-point numbers. Fortunately, dividing an int by a float will produce a float, so we just use 2.0 for our divisor instead of 2.

Thus:

averages = [(x + y) / 2.0 for (x, y) in zip(my_list[:-1], my_list[1:])]

Question 2:

That use of sum should work fine. The following works:

a = range(10)
# [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
b = sum(a)
print b
# Prints 45

Also, you don't need to assign everything to a variable at every step along the way. print sum(a) works just fine.

You will have to be more specific about exactly what you wrote and how it isn't working.

  • i didn't get , for the first question i got the my_list undefined . In my program its a random number not 1 , 2 , 3 ,4 .. for the second question i't doesn't work with me i don't know why – layo Dec 6 '10 at 2:17
  • 32
    my_list is only defined if you define it. That was supposed to be a place-holder for whatever you called the list that you're trying to work with. I can't guess what you called it. – Karl Knechtel Dec 6 '10 at 2:20
  • 1
    6 years later, this post is still helping people. I had a glitch in my code and was able to use your post to confirm that the related concepts in my code to yours were also right, so the problem must lie elsewhere. Then I found it. Just gave you and the person with the question an up-vote as a quick thank you. Best wishes. – TMWP Mar 17 '17 at 18:05
  • 1
    @KarlKnechtel He did have a list in his question and it was called "a". – HelloGoodbye Aug 1 '17 at 18:51
100

Sum list of numbers:

sum(list_of_nums)

Calculating half of n and n - 1 (if I have the pattern correct), using a list comprehension:

[(x + (x - 1)) / 2 for x in list_of_nums]

Sum adjacent elements, e.g. ((1 + 2) / 2) + ((2 + 3) / 2) + ... using reduce and lambdas

reduce(lambda x, y: (x + y) / 2, list_of_nums)
  • 4
    I think he wants to sum adjacent elements. There would be no point in taking the average of x and x - 1; we could just subtract 0.5 instead. – Karl Knechtel Dec 6 '10 at 2:08
  • 2
    The reduce function does not do what the post says. It calculates (((a1+a2)/2 + a3)/2 + a4)/2 ... – Moberg Feb 18 '15 at 14:41
  • from functools import reduce – tyrex Dec 26 '18 at 13:30
65

Question 2: To sum a list of integers:

a = [2, 3, 5, 8]
sum(a)
# 18
# or you can do:
sum(i for i in a)
# 18

If the list contains integers as strings:

a = ['5', '6']
# import Decimal: from decimal import Decimal
sum(Decimal(i) for i in a)
28

You can try this way:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
sm = sum(a[0:len(a)]) # Sum of 'a' from 0 index to 9 index. sum(a) == sum(a[0:len(a)]
print(sm) # Python 3
print sm  # Python 2
  • 4
    no need to create a copy like this, and it's horribly unpythonic. Avoid like the plague depite all the votes... – Jean-François Fabre Apr 18 '18 at 13:41
25
>>> a = range(10)
>>> sum(a)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'int' object is not callable
>>> del sum
>>> sum(a)
45

It seems that sum has been defined in the code somewhere and overwrites the default function. So I deleted it and the problem was solved.

17

Using a simple list-comprehension and the sum:

>> sum(i for i in range(x))/2. #if x = 10 the result will be 22.5
  • 4
    You don't need to use [ and ], you can just pass the generator expression sum(i/2. for i in range(x)) – Ivan Jul 6 '16 at 13:21
  • you're right @Ivan. edited – AndreL Aug 23 '17 at 9:05
  • 1
    sum(range(x)) / 2. avoids all the divisions, just divide in the end. – Jean-François Fabre Apr 18 '18 at 13:40
12

All answers did show a programmatic and general approach. I suggest a mathematical approach specific for your case. It can be faster in particular for long lists. It works because your list is a list of natural numbers up to n:

Let's assume we have the natural numbers 1, 2, 3, ..., 10:

>>> nat_seq = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

You can use the sum function on a list:

>>> print sum(nat_seq)
55

You can also use the formula n*(n+1)/2 where n is the value of the last element in the list (here: nat_seq[-1]), so you avoid iterating over elements:

>>> print (nat_seq[-1]*(nat_seq[-1]+1))/2
55

To generate the sequence (1+2)/2, (2+3)/2, ..., (9+10)/2 you can use a generator and the formula (2*k-1)/2. (note the dot to make the values floating points). You have to skip the first element when generating the new list:

>>> new_seq = [(2*k-1)/2. for k in nat_seq[1:]]
>>> print new_seq
[1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5]

Here too, you can use the sum function on that list:

>>> print sum(new_seq)
49.5

But you can also use the formula (((n*2+1)/2)**2-1)/2, so you can avoid iterating over elements:

>>> print (((new_seq[-1]*2+1)/2)**2-1)/2
49.5
5

The simplest way to solve this problem:

l =[1,2,3,4,5]
sum=0
for element in l:
    sum+=element
print sum
3

Let us make it easy for Beginner:-

  1. The global keyword will allow the global variable message to be assigned within the main function without producing a new local variable
    message = "This is a global!"


def main():
    global message
    message = "This is a local"
    print(message)


main()
# outputs "This is a local" - From the Function call
print(message)
# outputs "This is a local" - From the Outer scope

This concept is called Shadowing

  1. Sum a list of numbers in Python
nums = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

var = 0


def sums():
    for num in nums:
        global var
        var = var + num
    print(var)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    sums()

Outputs = 15

2

Short and simple:

def ave(x,y):
  return (x + y) / 2.0

map(ave, a[:-1], a[1:])

And here's how it looks:

>>> a = range(10)
>>> map(ave, a[:-1], a[1:])
[0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, 8.5]

Due to some stupidity in how Python handles a map over two lists, you do have to truncate the list, a[:-1]. It works more as you'd expect if you use itertools.imap:

>>> import itertools
>>> itertools.imap(ave, a, a[1:])
<itertools.imap object at 0x1005c3990>
>>> list(_)
[0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, 8.5]
  • Short, yes. Simple? It requires an explanation longer than the long solutions to understand what it's doing. – tekHedd Mar 1 '17 at 17:47
  • this introduces floating point accumulation error. Divide in the end instead. – Jean-François Fabre Apr 18 '18 at 13:42
2
import numpy as np    
x = [1,2,3,4,5]
[(np.mean((x[i],x[i+1]))) for i in range(len(x)-1)]
# [1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5]
2

Generators are an easy way to write this:

from __future__ import division
# ^- so that 3/2 is 1.5 not 1

def averages( lst ):
    it = iter(lst) # Get a iterator over the list
    first = next(it)
    for item in it:
        yield (first+item)/2
        first = item

print list(averages(range(1,11)))
# [1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5]
  • You can also divide by 2.0 to avoid integer division. – Chris Anderson Jan 13 '16 at 2:59
  • @ChrisAnderson not true in python 3. floating point division is the default. – Justin Meiners Jan 15 '17 at 6:35
1

Using the pairwise itertools recipe:

import itertools
def pairwise(iterable):
    "s -> (s0,s1), (s1,s2), (s2, s3), ..."
    a, b = itertools.tee(iterable)
    next(b, None)
    return itertools.izip(a, b)

def pair_averages(seq):
    return ( (a+b)/2 for a, b in pairwise(seq) )
1

I'd just use a lambda with map()

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
b = map(lambda x, y: (x+y)/2.0, fib[:-1], fib[1:])
print b
1

I use a while loop to get the result:

i = 0
while i < len(a)-1:
   result = (a[i]+a[i+1])/2
   print result
   i +=1
1

Loop through elements in the list and update the total like this:

def sum(a):
    total = 0
    index = 0
    while index < len(a):
        total = total + a[index]
        index = index + 1
    return total
1

Thanks to Karl Knechtel i was able to understand your question. My interpretation:

  1. You want a new list with the average of the element i and i+1.
  2. You want to sum each element in the list.

First question using anonymous function (aka. Lambda function):

s = lambda l: [(l[0]+l[1])/2.] + s(l[1:]) if len(l)>1 else []  #assuming you want result as float
s = lambda l: [(l[0]+l[1])//2] + s(l[1:]) if len(l)>1 else []  #assuming you want floor result

Second question also using anonymous function (aka. Lambda function):

p = lambda l: l[0] + p(l[1:]) if l!=[] else 0

Both questions combined in a single line of code :

s = lambda l: (l[0]+l[1])/2. + s(l[1:]) if len(l)>1 else 0  #assuming you want result as float
s = lambda l: (l[0]+l[1])/2. + s(l[1:]) if len(l)>1 else 0  #assuming you want floor result

use the one that fits best your needs

0

Try using a list comprehension. Something like:

new_list = [(old_list[i] + old_list[i+1])/2 for i in range(len(old_list-1))]
  • 1
    That is not a very good list comprehension. – Rafe Kettler Dec 6 '10 at 2:15
  • @Rafe it's a working one (if we just fix the parentheses at the end - should be range(len(old_list) - 1)), but Pythonistas generally frown upon the combination of 'range' and 'len'. A corollary to "there should only be one way to do it" is "the standard library provides a way for you to avoid ugly things". Indirect iteration - iterating over a sequence of numbers, so that you can use those numbers to index what you really want to iterate over - is an ugly thing. – Karl Knechtel Dec 6 '10 at 2:42
0

In the spirit of itertools. Inspiration from the pairwise recipe.

from itertools import tee, izip

def average(iterable):
    "s -> (s0,s1)/2.0, (s1,s2)/2.0, ..."
    a, b = tee(iterable)
    next(b, None)
    return ((x+y)/2.0 for x, y in izip(a, b))

Examples:

>>>list(average([1,2,3,4,5]))
[1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5]
>>>list(average([1,20,31,45,56,0,0]))
[10.5, 25.5, 38.0, 50.5, 28.0, 0.0]
>>>list(average(average([1,2,3,4,5])))
[2.0, 3.0, 4.0]
0
n = int(input("Enter the length of array: "))
list1 = []
for i in range(n):
    list1.append(int(input("Enter numbers: ")))
print("User inputs are", list1)

list2 = []
for j in range(0, n-1):
    list2.append((list1[j]+list1[j+1])/2)
print("result = ", list2)
0

A simple way is to use the iter_tools permutation

# If you are given a list

numList = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]

# and you are asked to find the number of three sums that add to a particular number

target = 10
# How you could come up with the answer?

from itertools import permutations

good_permutations = []

for p in permutations(numList, 3):
    if sum(p) == target:
        good_permutations.append(p)

print(good_permutations)

The result is:

[(1, 2, 7), (1, 3, 6), (1, 4, 5), (1, 5, 4), (1, 6, 3), (1, 7, 2), (2, 1, 7), (2, 3, 
5), (2, 5, 3), (2, 7, 1), (3, 1, 6), (3, 2, 5), (3, 5, 2), (3, 6, 1), (4, 1, 5), (4, 
5, 1), (5, 1, 4), (5, 2, 3), (5, 3, 2), (5, 4, 1), (6, 1, 3), (6, 3, 1), (7, 1, 2), 
(7, 2, 1)]

Note that order matters - meaning 1, 2, 7 is also shown as 2, 1, 7 and 7, 1, 2. You can reduce this by using a set.

-2

Try the following -

mylist = [1, 2, 3, 4]   

def add(mylist):
    total = 0
    for i in mylist:
        total += i
    return total

result = add(mylist)
print("sum = ", result)
  • 2
    A new answer should really be distinctively different from the existing answers. Also, your sum function does not differ from the built-in sum in behavior or name. You could actually delete the function definition from your answer and it would still work. – Noumenon Jul 5 '16 at 17:48
  • can you please check now – Sai G Jul 5 '16 at 21:07
  • 2
    I appreciate that you're improving your answer! The variable names are more descriptive and don't shadow the built-ins. But the fundamental problems are still there: the for-loop approach was already provided by stackoverflow.com/a/35359188/733092 above, and the function is redundant with the built-in sum. You'd get an A on a test for answering the question correctly, but StackOverflow answers also need to be useful to people arriving at this page, and duplicate answers aren't. – Noumenon Jul 5 '16 at 21:15

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