6

I saw How to extract dictionary single key-value pair in variables suggesting:

d = {"a":1}
(k, v), = d.items()

But: I only care about the value. And I want to pass that value to a method; like:

foo(v)

So the question is: is there a simple command that works for both python2 and python3 that gives me that value directly, without the detour of the "tuple" assignment?

Or is there a way to make the tuple assignment work for my usecase of calling a method?

9

list(d.values())[0] will be evaluated to 1. As pointed out in the comments, the cast to list is only needed in python3.

next(iter(d.values())) is another possibility (probably more memory efficient, as you do not need to create a list)

Both solution testes locally with python 3.6.0 and in TIO with python 2.

  • Why you convert list with list() again? – Wiriya Rungruang Apr 26 '17 at 9:10
  • 1
    @WiriyaRungruang d.values() is no list : it's a dict_values object, which does not support indexing. But as it's iterable, it can be converted to list, which supports indexing. – B. Barbieri Apr 26 '17 at 9:12
  • @B.Barbieri d.values()[0] and list(d.values())[0] I get the same results and type(d.values()) it's show <type 'list'> – Wiriya Rungruang Apr 26 '17 at 10:24
  • 1
    @WiriyaRungruang you're right ... on python 2. On python 3.6.0, it shows <class 'dict_values'>. – B. Barbieri Apr 26 '17 at 11:03
3

If you know the key then you can simply do :

d["a"] 
output :
1

and if you don't know the key:

for key in d.keys():
d[key]

#so basically you have to do :

for key in d.keys():
f00(d[key])
3

next(iter(d.values())) is the natural way to extract the only value from a dictionary. Conversion to list just to extract the only element is not necessary.

It is also performs best of the available options (tested on Python 3.6):

d = [{'a': i} for i in range(100000)]

%timeit [next(iter(i.values())) for i in d]  # 50.1 ms per loop
%timeit [list(i.values())[0] for i in d]     # 54.8 ms per loop
%timeit [list(i.values()).pop() for i in d]  # 81.8 ms per loop
1

is there a simple command that works for both python2 and python3 that gives me that value directly, without the detour of the "tuple" assignment?

The solution using dict.copy()(to preserve the original dict) and dict.popitem() functions:

d = {"a":1}
foo(d.copy().popitem()[1])

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