34

I need to print out enum values and their corresponding underyling values from certain types i accquire through reflection. This works fine most of the time. However if the enum is declared within a generic type, Enum.GetValues throws the following exception:

[System.NotSupportedException: Cannot create arrays of open type. ]  
at System.Array.InternalCreate(Void* elementType, Int32 rank, Int32* pLengths, Int32* pLowerBounds)    
at System.Array.CreateInstance(Type elementType, Int32 length)
at System.Array.UnsafeCreateInstance(Type elementType, Int32 length)   
at System.RuntimeType.GetEnumValues()

Full code for reproduction :

using System;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
       var enumType= typeof(Foo<>.Bar);
       var underlyingType = Enum.GetUnderlyingType(enumType);
       Console.WriteLine(enumType.IsEnum);

       foreach(var value in Enum.GetValues(enumType))
       {
           Console.WriteLine("{0} = {1}", value, Convert.ChangeType(value, underlyingType));
       }
    }

}

public class Foo<T>
{
    public enum Bar
    {
        A = 1,
        B = 2
    }
}

Or test it here

Is this desired behaviour and how do I work arround?

Constructing a type would be a workarround but inacceptable for me, since it would get too complicated.

44

Construction a type would be a workaround but inacceptable for me, since it would get too complicated.

That's the only way of getting values that will behave normally.

You can get at the fields of an open type, and the bizarre thing is that you can get values that way for enums. You should try to avoid using those values, but you can convert them to their underlying type.

public static void Main()
{
   var enumType = typeof(Foo<>.Bar);
   var underlyingType = Enum.GetUnderlyingType(enumType);

   foreach(var field in enumType.GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static))
   {
       var value = field.GetValue(null);
       var underlyingValue = Convert.ChangeType(value, underlyingType);
       Console.WriteLine($"{field.Name} = {underlyingValue}");
   }
}

However, a better solution is to use field.GetRawConstantValue():

public static void Main()
{
   var enumType = typeof(Foo<>.Bar);

   foreach(var field in enumType.GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static))
   {
       Console.WriteLine($"{field.Name} = {field.GetRawConstantValue()}");
   }
}

That way if the CLR is ever fixed to prevent such weird values from ever being produced, your code won't break.

  • @CSharpie: I've rolled that change back for the moment, as your question doesn't say what you're actually trying to do. Your suggested "solution" returns the integer values; that's still not values of the enum type. If that's what you needed, please make that clear in the question. – Jon Skeet Apr 26 '17 at 10:39
  • @CSharpie: Actually, it looks like we end up with some very weird values that way. Will edit. – Jon Skeet Apr 26 '17 at 10:41
  • @CSharpie: Updated the answer too. Be very careful with this: you're in really weird territory. – Jon Skeet Apr 26 '17 at 10:48
  • 6
    Allways a good sign when the debugger cannot evaluate a variable. – CSharpie Apr 26 '17 at 11:01
  • @CSharpie: See my edit, with a better solution. – Jon Skeet Apr 26 '17 at 15:25
3

This is the expected behavior. Open generic types cannot exist at runtime, so neither can anything that lives inside them. The only way you can do this is first closing the parent type with any type, and then using that to reflect the enum:

 var enumType = typeof(Foo<object>.Bar);
  • I know this. But it makes no sense to me in this case. Also i stated that constructing a type is too complicated in my case. – CSharpie Apr 26 '17 at 10:37
2

Foo is what's called an open type (A type which is not fully defined because it has a generic in it) And array of open type is not allowed, you could simulate it by doing

Array.CreateInstance(typeof(Foo<>), 2)

And since GetValues of Enum is dependent upon creating an array, it fails. You could instead do

var enumType = typeof(Foo<object>.Bar);

("object" being a dummy type so that you won't work with an open type) Or do what Jon Skeet suggested.

  • I know this. But it makes no sense to me in this case. Also i stated that constructing a type is too complicated in my case. – CSharpie Apr 26 '17 at 10:38

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