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SELECT TOP 2 name, lastname, city, DISTINCT(age) 
FROM [table1]
WHERE city = 'london' AND name = 'John'
ORDER BY date DESC

I was looking around SO and noticed that SQL Server has a long syntax for distinct - is there any better way to do this? Short and clean (relatively)?

Goal: to return 2 records where one record has age=18, other one age=21 (both are newest by date)

P.S. How can I achieve this in SQL Server 2016?

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  • 4
    Distinct works per row, not per column. Your query is invalid. Also, even if you will move the distinct to the correct place, you will get an error since you can't use a column in the order by that's not in the select clause if you are using distinct. I suggest remove the distinct all together and see what you get. – Zohar Peled Apr 26 '17 at 13:32
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    OK. you are under some misapprehension that short is better, this is not true in SQL. You need to write performant code not short code. Forget elegance too, the best sql code for the database does not appear to be elegant to most devs. – HLGEM Apr 26 '17 at 13:32
  • 1
    @HLGEM elegant is relative. A set based approach code that does the work good and fast is elegant for sql, even if it's not elegant for a programming languege. – Zohar Peled Apr 26 '17 at 13:34
  • @HLGEM Can u give me a working example how would I solve this problem with performant code? – PeterDoube1990 Apr 26 '17 at 13:42
  • Did you try to remove the distinct keyword? – Zohar Peled Apr 26 '17 at 13:44
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You can try the UNION operator to get the age=18 and age=21 in two separate queries and get then as a single output.

SELECT TOP 1 name, lastname, city, age, date
FROM [table1]
WHERE city = 'london' AND name = 'John'
AND Age = '18'
UNION
SELECT TOP 1 name, lastname, city, age, date
FROM [table1]
WHERE city = 'london' AND name = 'John'
AND Age = '21'
ORDER BY date DESC

Hope this helps, you have have to modify the query based in your requirement.

0

To achieve what you said your requirement was:

Select * from
(SELECT TOP 1 name, lastname, city, age 
FROM [table1]
WHERE city = 'london' AND name = 'John' and Age = 18
ORDER BY date DESC)b
union all 
Select * from 
(SELECT TOP 1 name, lastname, city, age 
FROM [table1]
WHERE city = 'london' AND name = 'John' and Age = 21
ORDER BY date DESC) b

Note this is neither long nor complicated. Because ordering is not allowed directly in a UNION query, I had to make the individual queries into derived tables. I used UNION ALL which is faster than Union because that each individual query will have mutually exclusive results (you can't be both 18 and 21).

It is possible you coudl immediately get the results you want but simply doing SELECT TOP 2 name, lastname, city, age FROM [table1] WHERE city = 'london' AND name = 'John' ORDER BY date DESC

However, since data changes over time, even if this returns the correct results today, it is not likely to always return the correct results. This query is fine if what you really want is the two most recent records, but not if you want the most recent of each of those specific ages which is the requirement you gave.

When you write SQL code, shortness and elegance are the very last qualities you want. You need several things first. First, you need to return the correct result set based on the meaning of the data. Next you need to make sure the query will perform as quickly as possible. UNION ALL is generally faster than using distinct or grouping. Performance is a consideration 100% of the time when you write SQL. Performance matters a lot in databases. This doesn't mean you need to fine tune everything to eek out the best possible performance, but it does mean you should be trying to avoid known costly operations when better alternatives are known even when that results in longer, more complex code.

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